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I can get this working with an XmlDataSource but not with my own classes. All I want to do is bind the listbox to my collection instance and then link the textbox to the listbox so I can edit the person's name (two-way). I've deliberately kept this as simple as possible in the hope that somebody can fill in the blanks.

XAML:

<Window x:Class="WpfListTest.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfListTest"
    Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="600">
    <Grid>
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="160"/>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="3"/>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="1*"/>
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <DockPanel Grid.Column="0">
            <ListBox />
        </DockPanel>
        <DockPanel Grid.Column="2">
            <StackPanel>
                <Label>Name</Label>
                <TextBox />
            </StackPanel>
        </DockPanel>
    </Grid>
</Window>

C# code behind:

namespace WpfListTest
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for Window1.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class Window1 : Window
    {
        public People MyPeeps = new People();

        public Window1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            MyPeeps.Add(new Person("Fred"));
            MyPeeps.Add(new Person("Jack"));
            MyPeeps.Add(new Person("Jill"));
        }
    }

    public class Person
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }

        public Person(string newName)
        {
            Name = newName;
        }
    }

    public class People : List<Person>
    {
    }
}

All the examples on the web seem to have what is effectively a static class returning code-defined data (like return new Person("blah blah")) rather than my own instance of a collection - in this case MyPeeps. Or maybe I'm not uttering the right search incantation.

One day I might make a sudden breakthrough of understanding this binding stuff but at the moment it's baffling me. Any help appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? If you don't try, you will never learn. – Daniel Hilgarth Sep 21 '11 at 10:50
    
Dozens of things. Rather than confuse the issue with dodgy code, I've just started again from scratch, keeping it simple. I've actually managed to get the list box contain the items with a simple testListBox.DataContext = MyPeeps; statement but now I can't get the text box synchronised. One step forward, two back. – GeoffM Sep 21 '11 at 10:55
up vote 11 down vote accepted

The correct way would be to use the MVVM pattern and create a ViewModel like so:

public class MainWindowViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private People _myPeeps;
    private Person _selectedPerson;

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public People MyPeeps
    {
        get { return _myPeeps; }
        set
        {
            if (_myPeeps == value)
            {
                return;
            }
            _myPeeps = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("MyPeeps");
        }
    }

    public Person SelectedPerson
    {
        get { return _selectedPerson; }
        set
        {
            if (_selectedPerson == value)
            {
                return;
            }
            _selectedPerson = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("SelectedPerson");
        }
    }

    private void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        var handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

Initialize it in your View's code behind like so:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private readonly MainWindowViewModel _viewModel;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        _viewModel = new MainWindowViewModel();
        _viewModel.MyPeeps = new People();
        _viewModel.MyPeeps.Add(new Person("Fred"));
        _viewModel.MyPeeps.Add(new Person("Jack"));
        _viewModel.MyPeeps.Add(new Person("Jill"));
        DataContext = _viewModel;

        InitializeComponent();
    }
}

And bind the data like so:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication3.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow"
        Height="350"
        Width="525">
  <Grid>
    <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
      <ColumnDefinition Width="160" />
      <ColumnDefinition Width="3" />
      <ColumnDefinition Width="1*" />
    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
    <DockPanel Grid.Column="0">
      <ListBox SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedPerson}"
               DisplayMemberPath="Name"
               ItemsSource="{Binding MyPeeps}" />
    </DockPanel>
    <DockPanel Grid.Column="2">
      <StackPanel>
        <Label>Name</Label>
        <TextBox Text="{Binding SelectedPerson.Name}" />
      </StackPanel>
    </DockPanel>
  </Grid>
</Window>

The binding will work like this:

The DataContext of the window itself is set to the ViewModel instance. Because the ListBox and the TextBox don't specify any DataContext, they inherit it from the Window. The bindings on an object always work relative to the DataContext if nothing else is being specified. That means that the TextBox binding looks for a property SelectedPerson in its DataContext (i.e., in the MainWindowViewModel) and for a Property Name in that SelectedPerson.

The basic mechanics of this sample are as follows: The SelectedPerson property on the ViewModel is always synchronized with the SelectedItem of the ListBox and the Text property of the TextBox is always synchronized with the Name property of the SelectedPerson.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, and an excellent explanation. Thank you. Sometimes the simplest solutions aren't the most obvious! – GeoffM Sep 21 '11 at 12:15
    
Very instructive and to the point, unlike all those overly complex examples on the internet. I'm surprised this answer only had 1 vote. Thanks. – Konrad Morawski Aug 8 '12 at 13:59

Try to inherit your People class from ObservableCollection<Person>

share|improve this answer
    
I got the listbox itself working but not synchronised with the textbox. It's difficult to change the People class (well, in the project I want to use it in, not specifically here) as it's autogenerated. However, I tried it and it didn't make any difference! Perhaps it would if the textbox was also working. – GeoffM Sep 21 '11 at 11:00
    
Please show your xaml file – Miklós Balogh Sep 21 '11 at 11:04
    
Um... at the top of this page? – GeoffM Sep 21 '11 at 11:06
    
Probably I miss something, but I can't see where is the binding. – Miklós Balogh Sep 21 '11 at 11:10
    
Exactly! That's what my question is! How do I bind? I have tried numerous things. – GeoffM Sep 21 '11 at 11:11

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