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Good day.

I'm trying to figure out what kind of pattern I can use for some new development, but I'm getting bogged down. I thought at first the Factory pattern, but then perhaps the Builder pattern, but neither of them seem to fit perfectly.

My problem is that the base Product class in the patterns are not generic. Everything in the Factory and the Builder patterns seem to require the base products being exactly alike.

For instance (a really dumbed down example):

public class ProductBase
{
    public int x;
    public int y;
}

public class ProductA : ProductBase
{
    public int z;
}

public class ProductB : ProductBase
{
    public int a;
}

I thought I could use the factory method to build the product and return them to the caller, then just have the caller set the unique data on the product once I get it, but this requires casting the product class to a specific type in order to set the type specific data. However, this all smells fishy to me because if I already know what type I need, am I really just complicating things with a pattern?

Anyway, any guidance as to what approach can be taken here would be welcome. Ultimately I'm looking for some modification to these patterns (or a different one altogether) to allow for non-generic products. Or perhaps setting type specific data on the product after creation via the pattern isn't so evil after-all?

UPDATE: I should have mentioned that I need to set the type-specific data (z or a) at runtime as it is passed in via a webform. So, I can't leave it to the Factory or Builder to create the complete instance, I still need some way of setting the data after the fact (or during instantiation, but that seems to not have a good generic solution).

share|improve this question
    
Does the client (of the factory) need to access properties z and a or can the client program to the ProductBase? –  Steven Sep 21 '11 at 11:57
    
I don't see how you could use a type specific setter without knowing the underlying type? –  Daniel Sep 21 '11 at 12:15
    
Really, the client needs to somehow set properties Z or a. On the top I have a web form where we are setting the information, then under that I envisioned using a factory to get me the object. This worked great until I realized while the products have a common base, they didn't share all properties. –  ChrisC Sep 21 '11 at 12:37
    
Daniel - yes, that is my problem. I have to know the underlying type, so doesn't that blow away the idea of a Factory or a Builder? –  ChrisC Sep 21 '11 at 12:37
    
Why would you need factory or builder? You may just call the base c'tor to avoid the c'tor duplication, but if the client needs the specific product instance - hand it to them –  Amittai Shapira Sep 21 '11 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

What is wrong in having one abstract factory method class and one conrete factory method class per each Product?

public class ProductBase
{
    public int x;
    public int y;
}

public class ProductA : ProductBase
{
    public int z;
}

public class ProductB : ProductBase
{
    public int a;
}
public class Factory
{
    abstract Product Create();
}
public class FactoryA:Factory
{
    override Product Create()
    {
         return new ProductA();
    }
}
public class FactoryB:Factory
{
    override Product Create()
    {
       return new ProductB();
    }
}

This is for generic case and the external param.

 internal static class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        private static void Main()
        {
            var fact = new FactoryA();
            int passParam = 5;//fromGUI
            ProductA f = fact.Create(passParam);
        }
    }

    public class ProductBase
    {
        public int x;
        public int y;
    }

    public class ProductA : ProductBase
    {
        public int z;
    }

    public class ProductB : ProductBase
    {
        public int a;
    }

    public abstract class Factory<T> where T : ProductBase
    {
        public abstract T Create(int passedParam);
    }

    public class FactoryA : Factory<ProductA>
    {
        public override ProductA Create(int passedParam)
        {
            return new ProductA() { x = 1, y = 1, z = passedParam };
        }
    }

    public class FactoryB : Factory<ProductB>
    {
        public override ProductB Create(int passedParam)
        {
            return new ProductB() { x = 1, y = 1, a = passedParam };
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer Hohhi, but I'm not sure what this solves. it does push creation responsiblity down into a factory class away from the client, but we aren't using a factory to return any instantiation of a generic type, we have to specify the type of factory to use, which I believe throws away the concept of the pattern. Also, I still just end up having to cast the product when I get it back, to set the product specific data. Also, see my comment on Nicola's answer, as I should have mentioned the data to be set is only passed in at runtime. –  ChrisC Sep 21 '11 at 12:53
    
You have to specify only the dynamic part which can be changed runtime which is as far as I know is common practice. –  Yurii Hohan Sep 21 '11 at 13:03

If you have a context where you need to use instances of ProductA and ProductB as if they were of the same type then it makes sense to provide these instances from a single function that takes as arguments what is needed to decide which concrete class to instantiate and has means to retrieve any object needed to properly create such instances. In this case all the attributes should be set from within this function so as to avoid switching on concrete types to complete construction.

If you feel that the construction process is too complicate modularize it:

class ProductFactoryBase {
  protected void Populate(ProductBase p) {
    p.x = some_x;
    p.y = some_y;
  }
}

class ProductAFactory : ProductFactoryBase {
  public ProductBase Create() {
    ProductA p = new ProductA();
    populate(p);
    p.z = some_z;
    return p;
  }
}

class ProductBFactory : ProductFactoryBase {
  public ProductBase Create() {
    ProductB p = new ProductB();
    populate(p);
    p.a = some_a;
    return p;
  }
}

class ProductFactory {
  private ProductAFactory paf = new ProductAFactory();
  private ProductBFactory pbf = new ProductBFactory();

  ProductBase Create(bool create_A) {
    if ( create_A )
      return paf.Create();
    else
      return pbf.Create();
  }
}

However if you don't really need to use ProductAs and ProductBs as if they were the same thing don't generalize just for the sake of it; just create and use instances of each type when you need them.

In between these two extremes you could consider making ProductFactoryBase generic to factor together commonality in the construction process even if your classes do not really need a common base. In this case you wouldn't have a common factory like ProductFactory above.

Hope this answers your question.

share|improve this answer
    
Nicola, thanks for that. The concept makes sense, but my problem is that the some_a or some_z values need to be passed in at runtime as they are values passed in from a web form (I should have mentioned this in the first place). I agree with your statement about not forcing generalization if it doesn't fit. I'll have to look back at the products to see if it makes to push all properties to the bae product class. If not, I may just have to do work with each specific type. –  ChrisC Sep 21 '11 at 12:49
    
I see nothing wrong with some_a and some_z to be passed as arguments to ProductFactory.Create(), or to be made available to it with other means, e.g. by other specific factories that are private to ProductFactory. –  Nicola Musatti Sep 21 '11 at 12:57
    
To me the real point is to separate construction of complex objects from their use: a car is not a car factory! –  Nicola Musatti Sep 21 '11 at 12:58
    
As mentioned in my response to Hohhi, I should have used a more complex example. If it was "string a" and "int b", do I now really want two separate versions of the ProductFactory.Create()? As well, as I add new products, I think constantly adding new versions of Create() to account for each differt product doesn't sound very flexible. –  ChrisC Sep 21 '11 at 15:54
    
Factories make sense if object construction is a multi-phase process which possibly involves retrieving data from elsewhere, e.g. a DBMS. If all you do is new SomeClass() you do not need factories. My approach is one factory per class, possibly using other factories to gather objects needed during construction. If you expect to be switching factories consider using some inversion of control library, otherwise don't be more flexible than you expect to need. –  Nicola Musatti Sep 21 '11 at 16:03

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