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I have a (PDF) file that exists on the file system, at a known location. I wish to overwrite the content of that file (with a fresh byte[]).

Best (and most efficient) possible way to do so (using Java APIs)?

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5  
(1) open the file; (2) write to it. What exactly is the issue? –  NPE Sep 21 '11 at 12:47
    
Note that no part of Java will give you any sort of guarantee as to what happens on the physical disk, so don't rely on any of this for confidential data. –  Kerrek SB Sep 21 '11 at 12:49
    
am looking for an API to do so in one shot. –  Saket Sep 21 '11 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's nothing built into the Java APIs that does this, but if you're looking for a library:

I don't see why any of the short methods posted here wouldn't work, though. There's no actual need for a library IMHO.

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public void oneShotAPI(File file, byte[] bytes) throws IOException
{
    FileOutputStream fos = null;
    try
    {
        fos = new FileOutputStream(file);
        fos.write(bytes);
        fos.flush();
    } finally 
    {
        if (fos != null)
        try
        {
            fos.close();
        } catch (IOException e)
        {
            // Sad, but true
        }
    }
}

Call it with:

oneShotAPI(new File("myPDF.png"), byteArray);
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well, I didn't mean that when i said one-shot :) –  Saket Sep 21 '11 at 12:55
1  
Get rid of the catch blocks and IOException local variable, try-finally works fine on its own and there's no need to swallow the close exception. –  Philipp Reichart Sep 21 '11 at 13:06
    
@Philipp: So, a try-finally would work exactly the same as what I wrote before? –  Martijn Courteaux Sep 21 '11 at 13:09
1  
Yes, it would still invoke your finally-block when an exception is thrown and after that throw the exception from the method. –  Philipp Reichart Sep 21 '11 at 13:15
1  
+1, but I think you need to check for fod == null in the finally block –  orip May 17 '12 at 13:39

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