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I have two wireless computers connected to an N wireless router. Each of these PCs are connected at between 108-150Mbps.

Theoretically, I should be able to transfer at 13.5MB/s to 18.75MB/s, under the absolute best of conditions.

The first computer (that is sending), uses a very fast SSD, which is around 100MB/s if I remember correctly. CPU usage also stays below 20%.

It sent 1960273535 bytes (1.8GB) in 656367ms. That's 2.8MB/s (22 out of 108 Megabits). When I open up task manager, I see that only 25-27% of the network connection is being used.

I am looking for any ideas, suggestions, or improvements that can make the transfer faster (over a network). I was thinking of buffering the file from the disk on a thread and sending the buffered data from another thread but I'm not sure if it's a good idea. Here is the SSCCE:

Host:

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;


public class Host {


    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {


        ServerSocket servsock = new ServerSocket(15064);
        Socket sock = servsock.accept();
            long time = System.currentTimeMillis();

        OutputStream out = sock.getOutputStream();
        FileInputStream fileInputStream = new FileInputStream("C:\\complete.rar");

        byte [] buffer = new byte[64*1024]; 
        int bytesRead = 0;
        long totalSent = 0;

        while ( (bytesRead = fileInputStream.read(buffer)) != -1)
        {
            if (bytesRead > 0)
            {   
                out.write(buffer, 0, bytesRead);
                totalSent += bytesRead;
                System.out.println("sent " + totalSent);
            }   
        }

        sock.close();

        System.out.println("Sent " + totalSent + " bytes in "
                + (System.currentTimeMillis() - time) + "ms.");

    }
}

Client:

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;

public class Client {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Socket sock = new Socket("127.0.0.1", 15064);
        InputStream in = sock.getInputStream();
        FileOutputStream fileOutputStream = new FileOutputStream("output.rar");

        byte [] buffer = new byte[64*1024]; 
        int bytesRead = 0;

        while ( (bytesRead = in.read(buffer)) != -1)
            fileOutputStream.write(buffer, 0, bytesRead);
        sock.close();
        fileOutputStream.close();
    }
}

Edit: I tried mapping a network drive and sending the file over that, and windows did even worse - 2.35MB/s. According to this article http://tinyurl.com/634qaqg mapping a network drive is faster than FTP, and I also don't have the time to stay playing around and setting up the FTP server.

Edit2: After changing the timer, turns out it was transferring at 3MB/s over WiFi. I hate the "theoretical" throughput. When I buy something, I want to know it's REAL performance. It turns out the code is indeed limited by WiFi speeds. I am still open to suggestions though.

Edit 3: After running the program on 100Mbps LAN, it managed to transfer the file at 11.8MB/s. That's pretty good considering that the maximum transfer rate is 12.5MB/s.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

At 2.8MB/s, it is unlikely that the slowness has anything to do with your code. It is almost certainly due to the wireless network not being able to achieve the theoretical throughput (possibly due to environmental conditions).

It's easy to test whether this is the case: simply time a large ftp or scp file transfer between the same two computers and see what kind of throughput you're seeing.

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1  
I agree, this would be a good test. Besides, wireless is never as good as it says on the box. That's why they have "up to 108Mbps", instead of just "108Mbps". If you were to try the same code using an actual cable, I'm quite sure you would reach a very reasonable/realistic speed. –  carlspring Sep 21 '11 at 13:19

I suggest you try the following code which prints

Wed Oct 26 14:21:03 BST 2011: Accepted a connection
Wed Oct 26 14:21:13 BST 2011: Transfer rate was 3212.5 MB/s

on the server and on the client prints

Wed Oct 26 14:21:03 BST 2011 Sending for 10.0 seconds.
Wed Oct 26 14:21:13 BST 2011 ... sent.
Wed Oct 26 14:21:13 BST 2011 ... received 33691287552
Send and received 3212.8 MB/s

Note: the total amount transferred is double this as everything sent client to server is sent server to client.


import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;
import java.nio.channels.ServerSocketChannel;
import java.nio.channels.SocketChannel;
import java.util.Date;

public class EchoServerMain {
  public static void main(String... args) throws IOException {
    int port = args.length < 1 ? 55555 : Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
    ServerSocketChannel ss = ServerSocketChannel.open();
    ss.socket().bind(new InetSocketAddress(port));
    while (!ss.socket().isClosed()) {
      SocketChannel s = ss.accept();
      System.out.println(new Date() + ": Accepted a connection");
      long start = System.nanoTime();
      ByteBuffer bytes = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(32*1024);
      int len;
      long total = 0;
      // Thank you @EJP, for a more elegant single loop.
      while ((len = s.read(bytes)) >= 0 || bytes.position() > 0) { 
        bytes.flip(); 
        s.write(bytes); 
        bytes.compact(); 
        total += len;
      }
      long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
      System.out.printf(new Date() + ": Transfer rate was %.1f MB/s%n", total * 1e9 / 1024 / 1024 / time);
    }
    ss.close();
  }
}

and

import java.io.EOFException;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;
import java.nio.channels.SocketChannel;
import java.util.Date;

public class EchoClientMain {
  public static void main(String ... args) throws IOException {
    String hostname = args.length < 1 ? "localhost" : args[0];
    int port = args.length < 2 ? 55555 : Integer.parseInt(args[1]);
    double seconds = args.length < 3 ? 10 : Double.parseDouble(args[2]);

    SocketChannel s = SocketChannel.open(new InetSocketAddress(hostname, port));
    s.configureBlocking(false);
    ByteBuffer bytes = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(32*1024);

    System.out.printf(new Date()+ " Sending for %.1f seconds.%n", seconds);
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    long dataSent = 0, dataReceived = 0;
    // run for 10 seconds.
    while(start + seconds*1e9 > System.nanoTime()) {
      bytes.clear();
      int wlen = s.write(bytes);
      if (wlen < 0) throw new IOException();
      dataSent += wlen;

      bytes.clear();
      int rlen = s.read(bytes);
      if (rlen < 0) throw new EOFException();
      dataReceived += rlen;
    }
    System.out.println(new Date()+ " ... sent.");

    while(dataReceived < dataSent) {
      bytes.clear();
      int rlen = s.read(bytes);
      if (rlen < 0) throw new EOFException();
      dataReceived += rlen;
    }
    s.close();
    long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.println(new Date()+ " ... received "+dataReceived);
    System.out.printf("Send and received %.1f MB/s%n", dataReceived * 1e9/1024/1024/time);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Locally, my results are: Server: Wed Sep 21 15:26:37 CEST 2011: Accepted a connection Exception in thread "main" java.io.IOException: An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host at sun.nio.ch.SocketDispatcher.read0(Native Method) at sun.nio.ch.SocketDispatcher.read(Unknown Source) at sun.nio.ch.IOUtil.readIntoNativeBuffer(Unknown Source) at sun.nio.ch.IOUtil.read(Unknown Source) at sun.nio.ch.SocketChannelImpl.read(Unknown Source) at EchoServerMain.main(EchoServerMain.java:22) –  David Sep 21 '11 at 13:30
    
Client: Wed Sep 21 15:26:37 CEST 2011 Sending for 10.0 seconds. Wed Sep 21 15:26:47 CEST 2011 ... sent. Wed Sep 21 15:26:48 CEST 2011 ... received 85393408 Send and received 7.5 MB/s` Windows 7, Core i5 2500K –  David Sep 21 '11 at 13:30
    
If you consider the total bandwidth over the network is double that, does that sound about right? I assume you are using the wireless, not loop back as I am getting 2 GB/s each way over loop back. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 21 '11 at 13:35
    
Thats loop back not over the network. It just disconnects and gives a bad reading. I don't know why. I'm using Windows 7, it's almost a clean install. –  David Sep 21 '11 at 13:41
1  
BTW: I have Ubuntu 11.0 Core i7 2600K @ 3.8 GHz. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 21 '11 at 13:46

Your timer is wrong ! you should start it after you accept the connection not when you start the host

Did you try increasing your buffer size ?

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I tried increasing it to 128K, 1MB, 1.2Mb and the speed was lower. I gave up trying different buffer sizes after that. –  David Sep 21 '11 at 13:33

Test the same program using a wired, Fast Ethernet (100Mbit/s) link between the computers (and then possibly using a 1Gbit link). That way, you'll see whether the transfer rate is actually limited by your program or by the link.

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(my answer, "test same program over different links" is complementary to @aix's answer: "test different programs over same link") –  Piskvor Sep 21 '11 at 13:38

Just set a very large socket send buffer, and if possible set a very large socket receive buffer at the receiver. Code 'optimizations' contribute basically nothing to these scenarios.

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