Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible in R to say - I want all indices from position i to the end of vector/matrix? Say I want a submatrix from 3rd column onwards. I currently only know this way:

A = matrix(rep(1:8, each = 5), nrow = 5) # just generate some example matrix...

A[,3:dim(A)[2]] # get submatrix from 3rd column onwards

But do I really need to write that ugly dim(A)[2]? Isn't there any elegant way how to say "from the 3rd column onwards"? Something like A[,3:]? (or A[,3:...])?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Sometimes it's easier to tell R what you don't want. In other words, exclude columns from the matrix using negative indexing:

Here are two alternative ways that both produce the same results:

A[, -(1:2)]
A[, -seq_len(2)]

Results:

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[2,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[3,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[4,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[5,]    3    4    5    6    7    8

But to answer your question as asked: Use ncol to find the number of columns. (Similarly there is nrow to find the number of rows.)

A[, 3:ncol(A)]

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[2,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[3,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[4,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[5,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
share|improve this answer
    
Good tips! Thanks! -(1:2) really looks cool... alsa ncol(A) is much shorter than dim(A)[2]. Thanks! –  TMS Sep 21 '11 at 13:59

For rows (not columns as per your example) then head() and tail() could be utilised.

A <- matrix(rep(1:8, each = 5), nrow = 5)
tail(A, 3)

is almost the same as

A[3:dim(A)[1],]

(the rownames/indices printed are different is all).

Those work for vectors and data frames too:

> tail(1:10, 4)
[1]  7  8  9 10
> tail(data.frame(A = 1:5, B = 1:5), 3)
  A B
3 3 3
4 4 4
5 5 5

For the column versions, you could adapt tail(), but it is a bit trickier. I wonder if NROW() and NCOL() might be useful here, rather than dim()?:

> A[, 3:NCOL(A)]
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[2,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[3,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[4,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[5,]    3    4    5    6    7    8

Or flip this on its head and instead of asking R for things, ask it to drop things instead. Here is a function that encapsulates this:

give <- function(x, i, dimen = 1L) {
    ind <- seq_len(i-1)
    if(isTRUE(all.equal(dimen, 1L))) { ## rows
        out <- x[-ind, ]
    } else if(isTRUE(all.equal(dimen, 2L))) { ## cols
        out <- x[, -ind]
    } else {
        stop("Only for 2d objects")
    }
    out
}

> give(A, 3)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8
[2,]    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8
[3,]    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8
> give(A, 3, dimen = 2)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[2,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[3,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[4,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
[5,]    3    4    5    6    7    8
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Gavin, thanks for the tail function tip. –  TMS Sep 21 '11 at 20:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.