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I have an expression that includes divisions, for which some of the denominators are sometimes zero. However, in those cases I would like that division to result in 1, instead of throwing an exception. Is there any straightforward way about doing this, or am I forced to do some if statements and changing the inputs to the expression to get this desired effect?

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13  
Why do you want to distort space and time like that? –  BoltClock Sep 21 '11 at 14:00
1  
what is your data-type? double doesn't throw here, IIRC - int will –  Marc Gravell Sep 21 '11 at 14:01
1  
Division with zero is nasty. I would surely check that before the division. Doubt that there is built-in functionality do do that for you, but it is an interesting question. –  Avada Kedavra Sep 21 '11 at 14:02
    
Can you simply not check to see if the Demominator is zero and return 1? –  Ramhound Sep 21 '11 at 14:25
1  
I want a function that makes Math.PI return "Delicious!" –  Mr. Manager Sep 21 '11 at 14:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Although I must question the motives here, if you need to do it, make a function.

double SafeDiv(double num, double denom) {
   if(denom == 0) {
      return 1;
   }
   return num/denom;
}
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+1 I cant see any more straight-forward and efficient solution than this. The templated solution by Michael Kjörling is nice too.. –  Avada Kedavra Sep 21 '11 at 14:11
    
double never throws a divide-by-zero exception –  Massimiliano Peluso Sep 21 '11 at 14:12
    
@Massimiliano Peluso: it returns ´infinity´, which is far from 1. –  Avada Kedavra Sep 21 '11 at 14:14
    
try with those number :var result= SafeDiv(5, -5); I will return -1 –  Massimiliano Peluso Sep 21 '11 at 14:16
3  
@Massimiliano Peluso: yes, as far as i know 5/-5 is exactly -1 :) –  Avada Kedavra Sep 21 '11 at 14:18

You could write a function for dividing. Here's an extension sample idea:

public static float DivideBy(this float toBeDivided, float divideBy){
    try
    {
    return toBeDivided / divideBy;
    }
    catch(DivideByZeroException)
    {
    return 1.0;
    }
}
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2  
As a little goodie, the two arguments to your method are known as the dividend and the divisor respectively. –  BoltClock Sep 21 '11 at 14:08
    
lol I've been out of math class for a while. –  Jeremy Holovacs Sep 21 '11 at 14:09
    
Also checking divideBy for 0 first and return 1 would be way faster. Exceptions are really slow. –  Skalli Sep 21 '11 at 14:12
    
Why use a try catch? You know you'll get an exception when the divisor is zero, so just use an if statement. –  Ray Sep 21 '11 at 14:13
1  
Exceptions are slow, but if they happen rarely, a try/catch would generally be faster, as you are not checking a condition every time. And I'd like to point out, this is just a sample idea; I really cannot fathom actually using this IRL. –  Jeremy Holovacs Sep 21 '11 at 14:14

Since it is not possible to redefine the division operator for built in types, you need to implement your version of division in a function.

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Something like this?

public T divide<T>(T dividend, T divisor) {
    return ((divisor == 0) ? (1) : (dividend / divisor));
}

or perhaps...

public T divide<T>(T dividend, T divisor) {
    try {
        return dividend / divisor;
    }
    catch (DivideByZeroException) {
        return 1;
    }
}

Personally, if you know that the divisor may be 0 in some cases, I wouldn't consider that case "exceptional" and thus use the first approach (which can also, quite conveniently, be inlined manually if you are so inclined).

That said, I agree with what Chris Marasti-Georg wrote, and question the motives for doing this.

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== won't work for your average T. And replacing it with Equals is a little shaky too when T is a float type. –  Henk Holterman Sep 21 '11 at 14:11
    
You can always substitute a type that is appropriate for your particular case. I did write "something like this?"; I did not intend it to be used exactly as-is, particularly since (as you point out) equality is a bit shaky with floating-point types, and floating-point is probably closer to what the OP is after than integral math. –  Michael Kjörling Sep 21 '11 at 14:16

No. If I understand your question, you would like to change the behavior of the divide operation and have it return 1 instead of throw. There is no way to do that.

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Check for the denominator first if not equal to zero perform the operation

public double ReturnValueFunction(int denominator, int numerator)
{
    try
    {
       if(denominator!=0)
       {
             return  numerator/ denominator; 

         /* or your code */
        }

  else
   {
            /*your code*/
        return someDecimalnumber;
   }
}
    catch(Exception ex)
    {

    }
}
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If either divider or divisor are double and divisor is 0 (or 0.0) result is positive or negative infinity. It will pass through all subsequent operations without throwing, and instead returning ±Infinity or NaN, depending on the other operand. Later you can check if final value is something meaningful.

If it is for some reason necessary to return 1 when dividing by zero, then you have several options:

  • Custom generic function
  • Custom type with overloaded operators
  • Check if divisor is 0 before the division

This is not something that is usually done, as far as I know, so you might rethink why would you do that..

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1  
0/5 = 0, 5/0 = PositiveInfinity –  Chris Marasti-Georg Sep 21 '11 at 14:42

Maybe you could try this

    double res = a / (b == 0 ? a : b);
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Fails when a = 0 as well. –  pkr298 Sep 21 '11 at 20:00

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