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I want to do:

template <class Derived=BattleData>
class BattleData : public BattleCommandManager<Derived> {
};

But obviously BattleData isn't declared, so I tried a forward declaration:

template <class T> class BattleData;

template <class Derived=BattleData>
class BattleData : public BattleCommandManager<Derived> {
};

But then I get

error: "wrong number of template parameter on the second line, with BattleData.

I really fail to see a solution to this!

Edit:

The reason I'm doing this is because I want to be able to use BattleData directly as a class, but I also want to be able to subclass it in which case I have to specify the derived class as the second template parameter.

For example let's say the corpus of my BattleData class is :

template <class Derived> class BattleData: public BaseClass<Derived> {
    void foo1(){};
    void foo2(){};
    void foo3(){};
}

And I have a subclass

template class SubBattleData: public BattleData<SubBattleData> {
    void foo1(){};
}

I would still want, in some cases, to be able to write code like this:

BattleData *x = new BattleData(...);

I can't even do the following without being able to use default arguments:

BattleData<BattleData> *x = new BattleData<BattleData>(...);

On one side, the reason functions aren't virtualized in the BattleData class is the benefit of having no virtual function. The other reason it doesn't work for me is that one of the parent CRTP classes invokes functions only if they're present in the derived type (using decltype(Derived::function) and enable-if like structures), and fall back to default behavior otherwise. Since there can be a great deal of those functions with a particular design pattern (like a CRTP that reads a protocol with many different cases and processes a case a particular way only if the derived class specify the corresponding function, otherwise just transfer it without processing).

So those functions can be present in SubBattleData and not BattleData, but both classes would work fine if instantiated, yet it's impossible to instantiate BattleData.

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By subclass it: Do you mean with virtual functions or only static polymorphism? –  pmr Sep 21 '11 at 14:27
    
I tried figuring out what you want to do on my own and got it right. Have a look at my suggestions. HTH. –  pmr Sep 21 '11 at 14:51

4 Answers 4

Can't you use an Empty class for the second template parameter?

template <class T=DataContainer, class Derived=BattleData<T, Empty> >
class BattleData : public BattleCommandManager<Derived> {
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is not going to work because BattleData isn't known at that point. –  pmr Sep 21 '11 at 15:10
    
Thank you! Thank you so much! Tricking the compiler that way is so convoluted, and I don't have to change any remaining code... :) –  coyotte508 Sep 21 '11 at 15:16
    
@pmr, forward declaration template <class T, class U> class BattleData; solves the problem you mention –  coyotte508 Sep 21 '11 at 15:21
    
actually, scratch that. The code compiles fine, but when I instantiate it I do get an invalid static_cast<> error. That's because CRTP tries to cast this to BattleData<T, Empty> while the derived class is actually BattleData<T, BattleData<T, Empty> >. –  coyotte508 Sep 22 '11 at 11:07

I don't see what you are trying to do. What is wrong with

template <class T=DataContainer>
class BattleData : public BattleCommandManager< BattleData<T> > {
};

If you specify Derived to be something else than the actual derived class static polymorphism is not going to work and CRTP becomes somewhat useless anyway.

Edit: From what I have gathered this is what you want to in abstract terms:

template <class Derived> 
struct Base {
    void interface() {
        static_cast<Derived*>(this)->implementation();
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct Derived : Base<Derived> {
  // dummy so we get you example
  T t;
  void implementation() {
    std::cout << "derived" << std::endl;
  }
};

struct Derived2 : public Derived<int> {
  // hide implementation in Derived
  // but still have Base::interface make the right call statically
  void implementation() {
    std::cout << "derived2" << std::endl;
  }
};

There is no way I know of that you can make this work. Another approach would be to use policy classes instead of CRTP. They are compatible with inheritance and you can achieve similar behaviour.

template<typename Policy>
struct BattleCmdManager : public Policy {
  using Policy::foo;
};

template<typename T>
struct BattleData {
  // ...
protected:
  void foo();
};

struct BattleData2 : public BattleData<int {
  // ...
protected:
  void foo();
};
share|improve this answer
    
I edited my question to answer you. –  coyotte508 Sep 21 '11 at 14:22
    
It's equivalent only if he wants to use the default type. But what if he wants to provide the second template argument? –  Nawaz Sep 21 '11 at 14:23
    
@Nawaz That was part of my answer: You can"t call this (or at least use it) as CRTP if he provides a second template parameter different from the actual derived class. –  pmr Sep 21 '11 at 14:25
    
I edited the exemple with a simpler example. All the classes involved are in the inheritance chain. But from your example I see the uses of Policy (which I am using too to specify the behavior of several things), I just never thought of using it as the 'implementation' class. I'll try it and make sure it works. –  coyotte508 Sep 21 '11 at 14:53
    
After trying, I found several problems. First, I have to use typedef BaseClass<BattleDataImpl, OtherPolicies> BattleData. This doesn't work if BattleDataImpl takes an extra template parameter, because Template aliases are not yet implemented. Secondly, the CRTP calls are mainly made from other policies, so since they would both be parent class of BaseClass, I'd have to use dynamic_cast<...>(this) instead of static_cast. –  coyotte508 Sep 21 '11 at 15:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is how I solved it:

template <class Derived> class BattleDataInh: public BaseClass<Derived> {
    void foo1(){};
    void foo2(){};
    void foo3(){};
};

template class SubBattleData: public BattleDataInh<SubBattleData> {
    void foo1(){};
};

class BattleData : public BattleDataInh<BattleData> {
};

And that way, I can add any other template parameters too. The solution was in front of my eyes the whole time but I didn't see it...

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You should be able to accomplish your original design goals more naturally than the above. You can't use the actual Derived typename as the default clearly because what you're really trying to write is the following:

template <class Derived=BattleData <BattleData <BattleData <...>>>
class BattleData : public BattleCommandManager<Derived> {
};

You get the idea. Instead, just use a placeholder like void:

template <typename T = void>
class BattleData : public BattleCommandManager <
    typename std::conditional <
        std::is_same <T, void>::value, 
        BattleData <void>,
        T
    >::type>
{
};

Disclaimer: I did not compile the above.

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