Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was writing a simple script in the school computer, and commiting the changes to git (in a repo that was in my pendrive, cloned from my computer at home). After several commits I realized I was commiting stuff as root.

Is there any way to change the author of these commits to my name?

share|improve this question
8  
Question: does using git filter-branch preserve the SHA1's for previous tags, versions and objects? Or will changing the author name force change the associated SHA1's as well? –  AndyL Aug 3 '10 at 14:13
13  
Hashes will change yes –  Xeross Oct 14 '10 at 15:16
add comment

19 Answers

up vote 157 down vote accepted

Changing the author (or committer) would require re-writing all of the history. If you're okay with that and think it's worth it then you should check out git filter-branch. The man page includes several examples to get you started. Also note that you can use environment variables to change the name of the author, committer, dates, etc. -- see the "Environment Variables" section of the git man page.

share|improve this answer
103  
Github has a public script for that help.github.com/articles/changing-author-info and it works great! –  rodowi Jun 25 '12 at 0:57
5  
After executing the script you may remove the backup branch by executing "git update-ref -d refs/original/refs/heads/master". –  D.R. Aug 14 '13 at 16:47
add comment

You can also do:

git filter-branch --commit-filter '
        if [ "$GIT_COMMITTER_NAME" = "<Old Name>" ];
        then
                GIT_COMMITTER_NAME="<New Name>";
                GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="<New Name>";
                GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL="<New Email>";
                GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="<New Email>";
                git commit-tree "$@";
        else
                git commit-tree "$@";
        fi' HEAD

Note, If you are using this command in windows command prompt you need to use " instead of ':

git filter-branch --commit-filter "
        if [ "$GIT_COMMITTER_NAME" = "<Old Name>" ];
        then
                GIT_COMMITTER_NAME="<New Name>";
                GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="<New Name>";
                GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL="<New Email>";
                GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="<New Email>";
                git commit-tree "$@";
        else
                git commit-tree "$@";
        fi" HEAD
share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't using env-filter the easier solution? Not sure why this is getting more votes, then. –  stigkj Dec 9 '11 at 9:21
3  
Then link is broken. How do we push these changes to another repository? –  Russell Feb 18 '12 at 23:21
14  
env-filter will change all the commits. This solution allows a conditional. –  user208769 Apr 11 '12 at 15:29
1  
"A previous backup already exists in refs/original/ Force overwriting the backup with -f" sorry but where the -f -flag is going to be whene executing this script two times. Actually that is in Brian's answer, sorry about disturbance just after the filter-branch is the solution. –  hhh May 4 '12 at 22:11
1  
+1 to this answer, works perfectly for me out-of-the-box. On my local GIT setup in my work I had used my GitHub email for commits. I wanted my corporate email to be present in my work GIT repo commits because my GitHub and work Git were entirely separate projects altogether. This script worked great for this purpose. –  therobyouknow Aug 6 '12 at 9:21
show 7 more comments

You could do

git rebase -i -p <some HEAD before all of your bad commits>

Then mark all of your bad commits as "edit" in the rebase file, and when git asks you to amend each commit, do

 git commit --amend --author "New Author Name <email@address.com>" 

edit or just close the editor that opens, and then do

git rebase --continue

to continue the rebase.

I don't know if there is a more streamlined way to do this with multiple commits.

EDIT 1:

As some of the commenters have noted, if you just want to change the most recent commit, the rebase command is not necessary. Just do

 git commit --amend --author "New Author Name <email@address.com>"

EDIT 2:

I just realized that there is a slight flaw in my original response. If there are any merge commits between the current HEAD and your <some HEAD before all your bad commits>, then git rebase will flatten them (and by the way, if you use GitHub pull requests, there are going to be a ton of merge commits in your history). This can very often lead to very different history (as duplicate changes may be "rebased out"), and in the worst case, it can lead to git rebase asking you to resolve difficult merge conflicts (which were likely already resolved in the merge commits). The solution is to use the -p flag to git rebase, which will preserve the merge structure of your history. The manpage for git rebase warns that using -p and -i can lead to issues, but in the BUGS section it says "Editing commits and rewording their commit messages should work fine."

I've added -p to the above command. For the case where you're just changing the most recent commit (my EDIT 1 above), this is not an issue.

Additional note:

You could skip opening the editor altogether here by appending -F .git/rebase-merge/message so that the command will be:

git commit --amend --author "New Author Name <email@address.com>" -F .git/rebase-merge/message && git rebase --continue
share|improve this answer
16  
Great for the odd commit though - useful if you're pairing and forget to change the author –  mloughran Sep 25 '09 at 11:14
16  
+1 for mentioning the usecase for the typical one-mistake fix: git commit --amend --author=username –  Nathan Kidd Mar 15 '10 at 20:03
6  
This is perfect, my most common usecase is that I sit down at another computer and forget to set up author and thus usually have < 5 commits or so to fix. –  Zitrax Aug 21 '10 at 11:34
6  
The command in your answer confused me and did not work, this should work: git commit --amend --author="Author Name <email@address.com>" –  Leif Gruenwoldt Feb 7 '11 at 22:54
1  
+1 for simplicity. All the higher-rated "filter-branch" suggestions were too complex and driving me nuts. –  Mike Feb 28 '12 at 9:13
show 14 more comments

One liner, but be careful if you have a multi-user repository -- this will change all commits to have the same (new) author and commmitter.

git filter-branch -f --env-filter "GIT_AUTHOR_NAME='Newname'; GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL='newemail'; GIT_COMMITTER_NAME='Newname'; GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL='newemail';" HEAD

With linebreaks in the string (which is possible in bash):

git filter-branch -f --env-filter "
    GIT_AUTHOR_NAME='Newname'
    GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL='newemail'
    GIT_COMMITTER_NAME='Newname'
    GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL='newemail'
  " HEAD
share|improve this answer
4  
Your "broken up" version doesn't have any effect: you need to change the environment variables inside an env-filter fragment, otherwise the setting you exported before invoking filter-branch are overwritten by the values from the commit for each filter run. –  araqnid Apr 15 '09 at 12:42
    
Thanks for the catch, misread the documentation. –  Brian Gianforcaro Apr 15 '09 at 14:47
12  
Don't forget GIT_COMMITTER_NAME and GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL, which will likely be wrong too if the author is. –  foolip Jan 1 '10 at 23:42
10  
Yes, but don't forget the committer's name/email. What worked for me was git filter-branch -f --env-filter "GIT_AUTHOR_NAME='Newname'; GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL='newemail'; GIT_COMMITER_NAME='Newname'; GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL='newemail';" HEAD Otherwise git will keep track of the old name as a committer! –  Olivier Verdier Feb 13 '10 at 20:14
2  
It worked for all commits for me, including the initial one. –  Vincent Mar 22 '12 at 22:37
show 5 more comments

For a single commit:

git commit --amend --author="Author Name <email@address.com>"

(extracted from asmeurer's answer)

share|improve this answer
5  
but that's only if it's the most recent commit –  Richard Jan 17 '12 at 23:24
1  
According to git help commit, git commit --amend changes the commit at the “tip of the current branch” (which is HEAD). This is normally the most recent commit, but you can make it any commit you want by first checking out that commit with git checkout <branch-name> or git checkout <commit-SHA>. –  Rory O'Kane Apr 25 '12 at 19:33
7  
But if you do that, all of the commits that already have that commit as a parent will be pointing to the wrong commit. Better to use filter-branch at that point. –  John Gietzen Jul 11 '12 at 21:02
    
@JohnGietzen: You can rebase the commits back onto the one that's changed to fix that. However, if you're doing >1 commit, then as mentioned, filter-branch is probably going to be a lot easier. –  Thanatos Oct 24 '13 at 20:35
add comment

It happens when you do not have a $HOME/.gitconfig initialized. You may fix this as:

git config --global user.name "you name"
git config --global user.email you@domain.com
git commit --amend --reset-author

tested with git version 1.7.5.4

share|improve this answer
2  
That works really well on the last commit. Nice and simple. Doesn't have to be a global change, using --local works too –  Ben May 30 '12 at 23:24
21  
+1 for --reset-author –  racha Aug 7 '12 at 8:34
5  
git commit --amend --reset-author --no-edit –  mafro Oct 9 '13 at 6:09
add comment

Github has a nice solution, which is the following shell script:

#!/bin/sh

git filter-branch --env-filter '

an="$GIT_AUTHOR_NAME"
am="$GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL"
cn="$GIT_COMMITTER_NAME"
cm="$GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL"

if [ "$GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL" = "your@email.to.match" ]
then
    cn="Your New Committer Name"
    cm="Your New Committer Email"
fi
if [ "$GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL" = "your@email.to.match" ]
then
    an="Your New Author Name"
    am="Your New Author Email"
fi

export GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="$an"
export GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="$am"
export GIT_COMMITTER_NAME="$cn"
export GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL="$cm"
'
share|improve this answer
1  
I basically have this same thing posted at my blog so +1 :) –  Xeross Oct 14 '10 at 15:15
3  
Worked perfectly. Just had to git reset --hard HEAD^ a couple of times on the other local repositories to get them to an earlier version, git pull-ed the amended version, and here I am without any lines containing unknown <stupid-windows-user@.StupidWindowsDomain.local> (got to love git's defaulting). –  pluma Jan 8 '11 at 17:34
    
+1 this worked for me. –  JD Isaacks Mar 6 '12 at 21:41
    
I cannot push after this. Do I have to use "-f"? –  fossilet Jul 30 '12 at 7:01
4  
I did git push -f. Also, local repos have to be recloned after this. –  fossilet Jul 30 '12 at 7:23
show 1 more comment

In the case where just the top few commits have bad authors, you can do this all inside git rebase -i using the exec command and the --amend commit, as follows:

git rebase -i HEAD^^^^^^ # as required

which presents you with the editable list of commits:

pick abcd Someone else's commit
pick defg my bad commit 1
pick 1234 my bad commit 2

Then add exec ... --author="..." lines after all lines with bad authors:

pick abcd Someone else's commit
pick defg my bad commit 1
exec git commit --amend --author="New Author Name <email@address.com>" -C HEAD
pick 1234 my bad commit 2
exec git commit --amend --author="New Author Name <email@address.com>" -C HEAD

save and run.

This solution may be longer to type than some others, but it's highly controllable - I know exactly what commits it hits.

Thanks to @asmeurer for the inspiration.

share|improve this answer
2  
I love this. Very nice. –  cplotts May 1 '12 at 15:31
2  
That is awesome. –  Jason Noble Sep 11 '12 at 18:00
2  
Definitely awesome. Can you shorten it by setting user.name and user.email in the repo's local config, and then each line is only`exec git commit --amend --reset-author -C HEAD` ? –  Andrew Nov 30 '12 at 11:07
    
@Andrew --reset-author works just fine. –  Boggin Mar 11 at 14:26
add comment

This is a more elaborated version of @Brian's version:

To change the author and committer, you can do this (with linebreaks in the string which is possible in bash):

git filter-branch --env-filter '
    if [ "$GIT_COMMITTER_NAME" = "<Old name>" ];
    then
        GIT_COMMITTER_NAME="<New name>";
        GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL="<New email>";
        GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="<New name>";
        GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="<New email>";
    fi' -- --all

You might get one of these errors:

  1. The temporary directory exists already
  2. Refs starting with refs/original exists already
    (this means another filter-branch has been run previously on the repository and the then original branch reference is backed up at refs/original)

If you want to force the run in spite of these errors, add the --force flag:

git filter-branch --force --env-filter '
    if [ "$GIT_COMMITTER_NAME" = "<Old name>" ];
    then
        GIT_COMMITTER_NAME="<New name>";
        GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL="<New email>";
        GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="<New name>";
        GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="<New email>";
    fi' -- --all

A little explanation of the -- --all option might be needed: It makes the filter-branch work on all revisions on all refs (which includes all branches). This means, for example, that tags are also rewritten and is visible on the rewritten branches.

A common "mistake" is to use HEAD instead, which means filtering all revisions on just the current branch. And then no tags (or other refs) would exist in the rewritten branch.

share|improve this answer
add comment
  1. run git rebase -i <sha1 or ref of starting point>
  2. mark all commits that you want to change with edit (or e)
  3. loop the following two commands until you have processed all the commits:

    git commit --amend --reuse-message=HEAD --author="New Author <new@author.email>" ; git rebase --continue

This will keep all the other commit information (including the dates). The --reuse-message=HEAD option prevents the message editor from launching.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I adapted this solution which works by ingesting a simple author-conv-file (format is the same as one for git-cvsimport). It works by changing all users as defined in the author-conv-file across all branches.

We used this in conjunction with cvs2git to migrate our repository from cvs to git.

i.e. Sample author-conv-file

john=John Doe <john.doe@hotmail.com>
jill=Jill Doe <jill.doe@hotmail.com>

The script:

 #!/bin/bash

 export $authors_file=author-conv-file

 git filter-branch -f --env-filter '

 get_name () {
     grep "^$1=" "$authors_file" |
     sed "s/^.*=\(.*\) <.*>$/\1/"
 }

 get_email () {
     grep "^$1=" "$authors_file" |
     sed "s/^.*=.* <\(.*\)>$/\1/"
 }

 GIT_AUTHOR_NAME=$(get_name $GIT_COMMITTER_NAME) &&
     GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL=$(get_email $GIT_COMMITTER_NAME) &&
     GIT_COMMITTER_NAME=$GIT_AUTHOR_NAME &&
     GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL=$GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL &&
     export GIT_AUTHOR_NAME GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL &&
     export GIT_COMMITTER_NAME GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL
 ' -- --all
share|improve this answer
1  
now hosted as gist gist.github.com/863084 –  Leif Gruenwoldt Mar 9 '11 at 21:52
    
And an expanded version of @leif81's gist: gist.github.com/1451142 –  stigkj Dec 9 '11 at 11:32
    
Thanks, I wonder why this is not core git (or git-svn) functionality. This can be done with a flag for git svn clone, but not in git filter-branch... –  Daniel Hershcovich Feb 15 '12 at 13:36
add comment

I use the following to rewrite the author for an entire repository, including tags and all branches:

git filter-branch --tag-name-filter cat --env-filter "export GIT_AUTHOR_NAME='New name';export GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL='New email'" -- --all

Then, as described in the MAN page of filter-branch, remove all original refs backed up by filter-branch (this is destructive, backup first):

git for-each-ref --format="%(refname)" refs/original/ | xargs -n 1 git update-ref -d
share|improve this answer
1  
It's very important to use --tag-name-filter cat. Otherwise your tags will remain on the original chain of commits. The other answers fail to mention this. –  jeberle Mar 30 at 17:22
add comment

You can use this alias so you can do:

git change-commits GIT_AUTHOR_NAME "old name" "new name"

or for the last 10 commits:

git change-commits GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL "old@email.com" "new@email.com" -- -10

Alias:

change-commits = "!f() { VAR=$1; OLD=$2; NEW=$3; shift 3; git filter-branch --env-filter \"if [[ $`echo $VAR` = \\\"$OLD\\\" ]]; then export $VAR=\\\"$NEW\\\"; fi\" $@; }; f "

Source: https://github.com/brauliobo/gitconfig/blob/master/configs/.gitconfig

Hope it is useful.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I found the presented versions way to aggressive, especially if you commit patches from other developers, this will essentially steal their code.

The version below does work on all branches and changes the author and comitter separately to prevent that.

Kudos to leif81 for the all option.

#!/bin/bash

git filter-branch --env-filter '
if [ "$GIT_AUTHOR_NAME" = "<old author>" ];
then
    GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="<new author>";
    GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="<youmail@somehost.ext>";
fi
if [ "$GIT_COMMITTER_NAME" = "<old committer>" ];
then
    GIT_COMMITTER_NAME="<new commiter>";
    GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL="<youmail@somehost.ext>";
fi
' -- --all
share|improve this answer
add comment

I should point out that if the only problem is that the author/email is different from your usual, this is not a problem. The correct fix is to create a file called .mailmap at the base of the directory with lines like

Name you want <email you want> Name you don't want <email you don't want>

And from then on, commands like git shortlog will consider those two names to be the same (unless you specifically tell them not to). See http://schacon.github.com/git/git-shortlog.html for more information.

This has the advantage of all the other solutions here in that you don't have to rewrite history, which can cause problems if you have an upstream, and is always a good way to accidentally lose data.

Of course, if you committed something as yourself and it should really be someone else, and you don't mind rewriting history at this point, changing the commit author is probably a good idea for attribution purposes (in which case I direct you to my other answer here).

share|improve this answer
add comment

If the commits you want to fix are the latest ones, and just a couple of them, you can use a combination of git reset and git stash to go back an commit them again after configuring the right name and email.

The sequence will be something like this (for 2 wrong commits, no pending changes):

git config user.name <good name>
git config user.email <good email>
git reset HEAD^
git stash
git reset HEAD^
git commit -a
git stash pop
git commit -a
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you are using Eclipse with EGit, then there is a quite easy solution.
Assumption: you have commits in a local branch 'local_master_user_x' which cannot be pushed to a remote branch 'master' because of the invalid user.

  1. Checkout the remote branch 'master'
  2. Select the projects/folders/files for which 'local_master_user_x' contains changes
  3. Right-click - Replace with - Branch - 'local_master_user_x'
  4. Commit these changes again, this time as the correct user and into the local branch 'master'
  5. Push to remote 'master'
share|improve this answer
add comment

Note that git stores two different e-mail addresses, one for the committer (the person who committed the change) and another one for the author (the person who wrote the change).

The committer information isn't displayed in most places, but you can see it with git log -1 --format=%cn,%ce (or use show instead of log to specify a particular commit).

While changing the author of your last commit is as simple as git commit --amend --author "Author Name <email@example.com>", there is no one-liner or argument to do the same to the committer information.

The solution is to (temporarily, or not) change your user information, then amend the commit, which will update the committer to your current information:

git config user.email my_other_email@example.com 
git commit --amend
share|improve this answer
add comment

There's also BFG Repo Cleaner by Roberto Tyley. If you need to clean up a large repo, it is orders or magnitude faster than git filter-branch.

http://rtyley.github.io/bfg-repo-cleaner/

share|improve this answer
add comment

protected by Sergey K. Feb 14 at 11:15

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.