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OR other way to formulate my question (though it didn't solve my problem): 'QObject::QObject' cannot access private member declared in class 'QObject'

I need SIGNALs and SLOTS functionality in my class, but I assume it is not possible without to derive from QObject?

class MyClass
{
signals:
   importantSignal();
public slots:
   importantSlot();
};

The Problem seems to be that I need to derive from QObject to use signals and slots ... but I need the default contructor of MyClass. But I can't construct them because of the following feature of QObject: No Copy Constructor or Assignment Operator.

I tried a lot ...

So my shoul Class look like that:

#include <QObject>
class MyClass: public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    explicit MyClass(QObject *parent = 0); //autogenerated by qtcreator for QObject derived class
    MyClass(const MyClass * other);

signals:
    importantSignal();
public slots:
    importantSlot();
};

I need the default contructor of MyClass.

So is there any possibility do avoid the "'QObject::QObject' cannot access private member declared in class 'QObject'" error?

Or as an alternative is there any possibility to use signals and slots without QObject?

I'm glad for any advice.

share|improve this question
4  
If you look at the Qt documentation for QObject they talk about why you shouldn't try to use QObjects as a "value" (no copy constructors), but rather as unique objects - in other words reference them always with a pointer. Perhaps there is a way that we can change your design a bit so that you can make use of signals/slots. For instance, if you want to store instances of your class in a container/list, you can store the pointer instead. Why exactly do you need the default constructor? Or, how are you using this class? – Liz Sep 21 '11 at 15:58
    
i use this class as dataholder, instead of a struc... - each entity as one tupel. and the point why i try to derivate QObject is that i want to use signals and slots for loading webcontent (pictures)... – 6e69636b6e616d65 Sep 21 '11 at 17:07
    
and i also want to store instances in self-written countainer/cluster. ? i need the default constructor for geting empty instances. – 6e69636b6e616d65 Sep 21 '11 at 17:14
    
mh... i exactly use my class for storing values and for example a picture loaded from the web. the picture for example is drawn on a map (using marblewidget). – 6e69636b6e616d65 Sep 21 '11 at 17:23
up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you want a copyable object with QObject features you need membership (by pointer) rather than inheritence.

You can derive a class Handler from QObject where Handler's slots call SomeInterface virtual functions on its parent.

struct NonQObjectHandler {
    virtual ~ NonQObjectHandler () {}
    virtual void receive (int, float) = 0;
};

class Handler : public NonQObjectHandler {
    struct Receiver;
    std :: unique_ptr <Receiver> m_receiver;
    void receive (int, float); // NonQObjectHandler
public:
    Handler ();
    Handler (const Handler &); // This is what you're really after
};

class Handler :: Receiver : public QObject {
Q_OBJECT
private:
    NonQObjectHandler * m_handler;
private slots:
    void receive (int, float); // Calls m_handler's receive
public:
    Receiver (NonQObjectHandler *);
};

Handler :: Handler ()
: m_receiver (new Receiver (this))
{
}

Handler :: Handler (const Handler & old)
: m_receiver (new Receiver (this))
{
    // Copy over any extra state variables also, but
    // Receiver is created anew.
}

Handler :: Receiver :: Receiver (NonQObjectHandler * h)
: m_handler (h)
{
    connect (foo, SIGNAL (bar (int, float)), this, SLOT (receive (int, float)));
}

void Handler :: Receiver :: receive (int i, float f)
{
    m_handler -> receive (i, f);
}
share|improve this answer
    
you may give an example/snippet? – 6e69636b6e616d65 Sep 21 '11 at 17:16

If you want to implement event-driven functionality using a signals/slots pattern, but do not want to work inside the confines of Qt (i.e., you want to use your class inside of STL containers, etc. that require copy-constructors), I would suggest using Boost::signal.

Otherwise, no, you can't possibly do what you're wanting without deriving from QObject since that base class is what handles the Qt runtime signals/slots functionality.

share|improve this answer
1  
mh... nice advice, but i like to work on with Qt. To late to use another lib. but thx. – 6e69636b6e616d65 Sep 21 '11 at 15:51
    
so is there a way to avoid that "'QObject::QObject' cannot access private member declared in class 'QObject'"-error? – 6e69636b6e616d65 Sep 21 '11 at 16:05
1  
Yes ... don't do something that requires a copy-constructor or assignment operator. This basically means that it's often a good choice to work with objects derived from QObject through pointers rather than instances that may need copying to move around. It's not that you can't use instances, but you can't copy them, and therefore you also can't stick them in STL containers, etc. – Jason Sep 21 '11 at 17:06

You cannot use Qt's signal/slot mechanisms without using QObject/Q_OBJECT.

You theoretically could create a dummy QObject and compose it into your class. The dummy would then forward the slot calls to your class. You will probably run in to issues with lifetime management, for the reasons that Liz has described in her comment.

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