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I've been trying to wrap my head around this the whole day...

Basically, I have the coordinates of two points that will always be inside a rectangle. I also know the position of the corners of the rectangle. Those two entry points are given at runtime.

I need an algorithm to find the 2 points where the bisector line made by the line segment between the given points intersects that rectangle.

image

Some details:

In the above image, A and B are given by their coordinates: A(x1, y1) and B(x2, y2). Basically, I'll need to find position of C and D. Red X is the center of the AB segment. This point (let's call it center) will have to be on the CD line.

What I've did:

  • found the center:

    center.x = (A.x+B.x)/2;
    center.y = (A.y+B.y)/2;
    
  • found CD slope:

    AB_slope =  A.y - B.y / A.x - B.x;
    CD_slope = -1/AB_slope;
    

Knowing the center and CD slope gave me the equation of CD and such, I've attempted to find a solution by trying the position of the points on all the 4 borders of the rectangle. However, for some reason it doesn't work: every time I have a solution let's say for C, D is plotted outside or vice-versa.

Here are the equations I'm using:

  • knowing x:

    y = (CD_slope * (x - center.x)) + center.y;
    if y > 0 && y < 512: #=> solution found!
    
  • knowing y:

    x = (y - center.y + CD_slope*center.x)/CD_slope;
    if x > 0 && x < 512: #=> solution found!
    

From this, I could also end up with another segment (let's say I've found C and I know the center), but geometry failed on me to find the extension of this segment till it intersects the other side of the rectangle.

Updated to include coding snippet

(see comments in main function)

typedef struct { double x; double y; } Point;

Point calculate_center(Point p1, Point p2) {
    Point point;
    point.x = (p1.x+p2.x)/2;
    point.y = (p1.y+p2.y)/2;
    return point;
}

double calculate_pslope(Point p1, Point p2) {
    double dy = p1.y - p2.y;
    double dx = p1.x - p2.x;
    double slope = dy/dx; // this is p1 <-> p2 slope

    return -1/slope;
}

int calculate_y_knowing_x(double pslope, Point center, double x, Point *point) {
    double min= 0.00;
    double max= 512.00;
    double y = (pslope * (x - center.x)) + center.y;

    if(y >= min && y <= max) {
        point->x = corner;
        point->y = y;
        printf("++> found Y for X, point is P(%f, %f)\n", point->x, point->y);
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

int calculate_x_knowing_y(double pslope, Point center, double y, Point *point) {
    double min= 0.00;
    double max= 512.00;
    double x = (y - center.y + pslope*center.x)/pslope;

    if(x >= min && x <= max) {
        point->x = x;
        point->y = y;
        printf("++> found X for Y, point is: P(%f, %f)\n", point->x, point->y);
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    Point A, B;

    // parse argv and define A and B
    // this code is omitted here, let's assume:
    // A.x = 175.00;
    // A.y = 420.00;
    // B.x = 316.00;
    // B.y = 62.00;

    Point C;
    Point D;

    Point center;
    double pslope;

    center = calculate_center(A, B);
    pslope = calculate_pslope(A, B);

    // Here's where the fun happens:
    // I'll need to find the right succession of calls to calculate_*_knowing_* 
    // for 4 cases: x=0, X=512 #=> call calculate_y_knowing_x
    // y=0, y=512 #=> call calculate_x_knowing_y
    // and do this 2 times for both C and D points.
    // Also, if point C is found, point D should not be on the same side (thus C != D)

    // for the given A and B points the succession is:
    calculate_y_knowing_x(pslope, center, 0.00, C);
    calculate_y_knowing_x(pslope, center, 512.00, D);
    // will yield: C(0.00, 144.308659), D(512.00, 345.962291)

    // But if A(350.00, 314.00) and B(106.00, 109.00)
    // the succesion should be:
    // calculate_y_knowing_x(pslope, center, 0.00, C);
    // calculate_x_knowing_y(pslope, center, 512.00, D);
    // to yield C(0.00, 482.875610) and D(405.694672, 0.00)


    return 0;
}

This is C code.

Notes:

  • The image was drawn by hand.
  • The coordinate system is rotated 90° CCW but should not have an impact on the solution
  • I'm looking for an algorithm in C, but I can read other programming languages
  • This is a 2D problem
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried some simple examples by hand? This is what you (or anyone here) is going to need to do to figure out where the bug is. –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 21 '11 at 17:17
    
IMO this problem is strictly mathematical. Should it be moved to Math.SE? –  jweyrich Sep 21 '11 at 20:27
1  
@jweyrich, I don't think so. This is a programmatical problem. –  TMS Sep 21 '11 at 20:48
    
@apann, keep going, the principle is just simple, you only have to handle all possibilities and cases carefully. Then, maybe, careful debug might be needed. Good luck. –  TMS Sep 21 '11 at 20:51
1  
To be fair, this is a simple algebra problem; it's simply intersection of two lines. Programming it up is a minor concern. –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 21 '11 at 23:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following code should do the trick:

typedef struct { float x; float y; } Point;
typedef struct { Point point[2]; } Line;
typedef struct { Point origin; float width; float height; } Rect;
typedef struct { Point origin; Point direction; } Vector;

Point SolveVectorForX(Vector vector, float x)
{
    Point solution;
    solution.x = x;
    solution.y = vector.origin.y +
        (x - vector.origin.x)*vector.direction.y/vector.direction.x;
    return solution;
}

Point SolveVectorForY(Vector vector, float y)
{
    Point solution;
    solution.x = vector.origin.x +
        (y - vector.origin.y)*vector.direction.x/vector.direction.y;
    solution.y = y;
    return solution;
}

Line FindLineBisectorIntersectionWithRect(Rect rect, Line AB)
{
    Point A = AB.point[0];
    Point B = AB.point[1];
    int pointCount = 0;
    int testEdge = 0;
    Line result;
    Vector CD;

    // CD.origin = midpoint of line AB
    CD.origin.x = (A.x + B.x)/2.0;
    CD.origin.y = (A.y + B.y)/2.0;

    // CD.direction = negative inverse of AB.direction (perpendicular to AB)
    CD.direction.x = (B.y - A.y);
    CD.direction.y = (A.x - B.x);

    // for each edge of the rectangle, check:
    // 1. that an intersection with CD is possible (avoid division by zero)
    // 2. that the intersection point falls within the endpoints of the edge
    // 3. if both check out, use that point as one of the solution points
    while ((++testEdge <= 4) && (pointCount < 2))
    {
        Point point;

        switch (testEdge)
        {
            case 1: // check minimum x edge of rect
                if (CD.direction.x == 0) { continue; }
                point = SolveVectorForX(CD, rect.origin.x);
                if (point.y < rect.origin.y) { continue; }
                if (point.y > (rect.origin.y + rect.height)) { continue; }
                break;

            case 2: // check maximum x edge of rect
                if (CD.direction.x == 0) { continue; }
                point = SolveVectorForX(CD, rect.origin.x + rect.width);
                if (point.y < rect.origin.y) { continue; }
                if (point.y > (rect.origin.y + rect.height)) { continue; }
                break;

            case 3: // check minimum y edge of rect
                if (CD.direction.y == 0) { continue; }
                point = SolveVectorForY(CD, rect.origin.y);
                if (point.x < rect.origin.x) { continue; }
                if (point.x > (rect.origin.x + rect.width)) { continue; }
                break;

            case 4: // check maximum y edge of rect
                if (CD.direction.y == 0) { continue; }
                point = SolveVectorForY(CD, rect.origin.y + rect.height);
                if (point.x < rect.origin.x) { continue; }
                if (point.x > (rect.origin.x + rect.width)) { continue; }
                break;
        };

        // if we made it here, this point is one of the solution points
        result.point[pointCount++] = point;
    }

    // pointCount should always be 2
    assert(pointCount == 2);

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A loop and a switch statement seems somewhat superfluous here... –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 22 '11 at 0:00
    
I used it because I think it reads better. If you have a better option, I would be happy to see it (no snark intended - I'm not 100% happy with the loop & switch myself). –  e.James Sep 22 '11 at 2:34
    
@e.James: I'm using more or less something similar with what you've posted (with the exception I'm using the slope of CD rather than direction). The problem is... with this code I can end up with C and D on the same side of the rectangle, basically C will be in the same point as D. –  apann Sep 22 '11 at 9:46
    
@apann: I tested this out, and it works. C and D are definitely unique points. There must be a subtle difference somewhere. –  e.James Sep 22 '11 at 13:12
    
Actually, take a look at my "loop and switch" code. It may not be pretty, but it handles the "fun" that you mention at the end of your question. You end up with 4 possible points, but only 2 of them will be valid solutions for C and D. –  e.James Sep 22 '11 at 13:17

You have the equation for CD (in the form (y - y0) = m(x - x0)) which you can transform into the form y = mx + c. You can also transform it into the form x = (1/m)y - (c/m).

You then simply need to find solutions for when x=0, x=512, y=0, y=512.

share|improve this answer

We start from the center point C and the direction of AB, D:

C.x = (A.x+B.x) / 2
C.y = (A.y+B.y) / 2
D.x = (A.x-B.x) / 2
D.y = (A.y-B.y) / 2

then if P is a point on the line, CP must be perpendicular to D. The equation of the line is:

DotProduct(P-C, D) = 0

or

CD = C.x*D.x + C.y*D.y
P.x * D.x + P.y * D.y - CD = 0

for each of the four edges of the square, we have an equation:

P.x=0 -> P.y = CD / D.y
P.y=0 -> P.x = CD / D.x
P.x=512 -> P.y = (CD - 512*D.x) / D.y
P.y=512 -> P.x = (CD - 512*D.y) / D.x

Except for degenerate cases where 2 points coincide, only 2 of these 4 points will have both P.x and P.y between 0 and 512. You'll also have to check for the special cases D.x = 0 or D.y = 0.

share|improve this answer
    
can you edit to use the same notations as in my image? got confused by "center point C". thanks! –  apann Sep 21 '11 at 19:29

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