Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I've got two models, State and Acquisition. State has_many Acquisitions. I felt like an autoincrementing integer primary key for 51 records was rather silly. So I altered the model for the State to be the PK (State being the two letter abbreviation; I'm not storing the actual state name anywhere:

class State < ActiveRecord::Base  
  self.primary_key = "state"  
  has_many :acquisition_histories  
end

The problem is when I created my Acquisition model, it created the foreign key column state_id as an integer. More specifically, the script/generated migration did:

class CreateAcquisitions < ActiveRecord::Migration  
  def self.up  
    create_table :acquisitions do |t|  
      t.date :date  
      t.string :category  
      t.text :notes  
      t.references :state  
      t.timestamps  
    end
  end
end

I'm assuming that t.references data type sets it to int. The problem is my create method on my Acquisition class is trying to put a state abbreviation into the state_id field on the table acquisitions (and yes, it's called state_id on the database, even though it says :state in the migration script). The method doesn't fail, but it does put a 0 in the state_id field and the records go into the ether.

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rails works best when you don't fight against the defaults. What harm does it do to have an integer primary key on your state table?

Unless you're stuck with a legacy schema that you have no control over, I'd advise you to stick to the Rails defaults—convention over configuration, right?—and concentrate on the important parts of your app, such as the UI and the business logic.

share|improve this answer
2  
For that sort of thing I tend to define a constant in the State class i.e. ALL = State.all and then use State::ALL as the source for dropdowns etc. That way, the SQL query only runs at start-up in Production. –  John Topley Apr 15 '09 at 9:27
1  
I'm not worried about performance at all, I just don't like the concept of an extra unique identifier. But I'm going to go back with the convention, assuming I can figure out how to back everything back out. I'm fairly new to Rails. –  fr0man Apr 16 '09 at 2:37
8  
Unfortunately, there are actually use cases in which you might want to do something out of the box. For the 99 the convention may be ideal but in the off cases a more helpful response might be warranted. –  JC Grubbs May 24 '12 at 19:14
1  
@JohnTopley Not true at all. –  Jordon Bedwell Aug 24 '12 at 15:17
7  
I agree with @JohnTopley that it is best not to fight Rails, but the answer doesn't actually answer the question. I think it is possible to achieve with Rails (but don't yet know how either). There are plenty of legitimate reasons for not being able to use an auto-incrementing integer for primary keys (like scalability requirements forcing distributed implementations that cannot have any centralized components at all, for example). –  DavidJ Aug 29 '12 at 21:39

Though, I agree that this might be more trouble than it's worth considering the extra effort of working against the defaults elsewhere, just in case you actually want to do what you've asked, here's the closest approach I know of:

create states migration:

create_table :states, :id => false do |t|
  t.string :state, :length => 2
  t.string :name
end
add_index :states, :state, :unique => true

states model:

class State
  set_primary_key :state
end
share|improve this answer

if you find yourself here... leave as quickly as you can and go to: Using Rails, how can I set my primary key to not be an integer-typed column?

share|improve this answer

I'm working on a project that uses UUIDs as primary keys, and honestly, I don't recommend it unless you're certain you absolutely need it. There are a ton of Rails plugins out there that will not work unmodified with a database that uses strings as primary keys.

share|improve this answer

You want to follow the Rails conventions. The extra primary key is not an issue in any way. Just use it.

share|improve this answer
5  
Storage cost (obvious). Computational cost (clustering + autoincrement IDs isn't necessarily good). Complexity cost (schema is confusing if it has noise over what really needs to be there). Using UUIDs as primary keys make a whole lot of sense in offline applications that must correlate their data later with a central DB) –  sethcall May 13 '12 at 14:36
class CreateAcquisitions < ActiveRecord::Migration  
    def self.up  
        create_table :acquisitions, :id => false do |t|  
          t.date :date  
          t.string :category  
          t.text :notes  
          t.references :state  
          t.timestamps
        end
    end
end
share|improve this answer

I had a bit of experience with string used as primary keys and it's a pain in the ***. Remember that by default if you want to pass an object with the default :controller/:action/:id pattern, the :id will be a string and this will probably lead to routing problems if some ids get weirdly formatted ;)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.