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I Have a table called Sur_Data and the data looks like:

ID     SV_Date
258    13/01/2010
569    15/02/2011
695    26/05/2010
745    12/06/2010

Now I want to select the ID's from that table and insert into another table so we are using something like:

Insert into Surdate(ID)
Select ID from Sur_Data
where ISDATE(SV_Date) = 1

Since the format in SV_Date is different it is not inserting any records into Surdate table.

So I am trying to see is there a way that we could restrict the data in Sur_Data table to have only date's that are in MM/DD/YYYY format.So whenever they try to insert records of different format it should throw an error.

Can anyone help on this?

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7  
Why not use an appropriate datetime (or date for 2008) data type for the SV_Date column? –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 21 '11 at 18:15
    
@JoeStefanelli I am but dates like 26/05/2010,15/02/2011 will also be inserted but when I use isdate() on those it will return 0 and will not be inserted into another table –  Peter Sep 21 '11 at 18:18
    
How about having a trigger on the table which converts the date into required format before inserting/updating? –  Praveen Sep 21 '11 at 18:18
4  
@Peter - A datetime column would not have a "format". I think that you are confused about something. If your column is giving you something that says it's not a date then you're not using a datetime column datatype. –  Tom H. Sep 21 '11 at 18:37
    
@Peter: a DATETIME column is a DATETIME column is a DATETIME column - it doesn't have any notion of a "format" or anything - it's just a value. The formatting only comes into play when showing such data, e.g. in SQL Server Mgmt Studio or in your app. See Demystifying the SQL Server DATETIME type for more details –  marc_s Sep 21 '11 at 21:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Edit: for example 2 & 3, ANSI WARNINGS must be off.

IS_DATE function is influenced by DATEFORMAT setting for current SQL Server session/connection.

Example 1:

DECLARE @d1 VARCHAR(25) = '26/05/2010'
        ,@d2 VARCHAR(25) = '15/02/2011';

PRINT '*****Test 1*****'        
SET DATEFORMAT DMY;
SELECT  ISDATE(@d1), ISDATE(@d2);       

PRINT '*****Test 2*****'        
SET DATEFORMAT MDY;
SELECT  ISDATE(@d1), ISDATE(@d2);

Results:

*****Test 1*****

----------- -----------
1           1

(1 row(s) affected)

*****Test 2*****

----------- -----------
0           0

(1 row(s) affected)

Now, you can see how DATEFORMAT influences ISDATE function. Instead of ISDATE function you can use CONVERT function with different date/time styles. If a [n][var]char value doesn't have the selected style then CONVERT function will return NULL. For dd/mm/yyyy values (british) can be used style 103 and for mm/dd/yyyy values (U.S.) can be used style 101.

Example 2:

DECLARE @Results TABLE
(
    ID INT PRIMARY KEY
    ,SV_Date VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
);
SET ANSI_WARNINGS OFF;
INSERT  @Results 
VALUES
 (258,    '13/01/2010')
,(569,    '15/02/2011')
,(695,    '26/05/2010')
,(745,    '12/06/2010');

SELECT  *
        ,ISDATE(r.SV_Date) [IS_DATETIME]
        ,CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,103) [IS_DATETIME British/French style=dd/mm/yyyy]
        ,CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,101) [IS_DATETIME U.S. style=mm/dd/yyyy]
        ,CASE 
            WHEN CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,103) IS NOT NULL AND CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,101) IS NULL THEN 'IS_DMY'
            WHEN CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,103) IS NULL AND CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,101) IS NOT NULL THEN 'IS_MDY'
            WHEN CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,103) IS NOT NULL AND CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,101) IS NOT NULL THEN 'IS_DMY_OR_MDY'
            WHEN CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,103) IS NULL AND CONVERT(DATETIME,r.SV_Date,101) IS NULL THEN 'IS_NOT_DMY_OR_MDY'
        END
FROM    @Results r;

Results:

ID          SV_Date              IS_DATETIME IS_DATETIME British/French style=dd/mm/yyyy IS_DATETIME U.S. style=mm/dd/yyyy 
----------- -------------------- ----------- ------------------------------------------- --------------------------------- -----------------
258         13/01/2010           0           2010-01-13 00:00:00.000                     NULL                              IS_DMY
569         15/02/2011           0           2011-02-15 00:00:00.000                     NULL                              IS_DMY
695         26/05/2010           0           2010-05-26 00:00:00.000                     NULL                              IS_DMY
745         12/06/2010           1           2010-06-12 00:00:00.000                     2010-12-06 00:00:00.000           IS_DMY_OR_MDY

Now, if you want to check SV_Date values for mm/dd/yyyy format (style 101 - U.S.) then you can use a CHECK constraint like this:

Example 3:

DECLARE @Results2 TABLE
(
    ID INT PRIMARY KEY
    ,SV_Date VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
    ,CHECK( CONVERT(DATETIME,SV_Date,101) IS NOT NULL )
);
SET ANSI_WARNINGS OFF;
INSERT  @Results2 
VALUES  (258,    '13/01/2010');
INSERT  @Results2 
VALUES  (569,    '15/02/2011');
INSERT  @Results2 
VALUES  (695,    '26/05/2010');
INSERT  @Results2 
VALUES  (745,    '12/06/2010');
SELECT  *
FROM    @Results2;

Results:

ID          SV_Date
----------- --------------------
745         12/06/2010

(1 row(s) affected)

Observations: If you want to find current DATEFORMAT setting (current session) then you can use sys.dm_exec_sessions view:

SELECT  s.date_format, s.date_first
FROM    sys.dm_exec_sessions s
WHERE   s.session_id = @@SPID 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 clever use of the convert function with datetime. I never realized it had the capability. –  billinkc Sep 21 '11 at 20:23
    
@Bogdan When I execute them I am getting errors Like: Msg 242, Level 16, State 3, Line 7 The conversion of a varchar data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range value. The statement has been terminated. –  Peter Sep 21 '11 at 21:22
    
What have you tested ? Did you changed the data type ? –  Bogdan Sahlean Sep 21 '11 at 21:29
    
@Bogdan I am sorry for the above comment. But this is what Exactly I am looking for. Thank you so much. Appreciate all your help on this. –  Peter Sep 21 '11 at 21:38
    
@Peter: tell me what example did you have run ? Example 1 / 2 / 3 ? –  Bogdan Sahlean Sep 21 '11 at 21:43

To strictly answer the question, you could create a function (CLR or TSQL) and apply that as a column constraint/check.

But as @joe Stefanelli correctly points out, store it as a datetime data type and let the client handle the presentation format.

Edit

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190273.aspx

ALTER TABLE
    dbo.Sur_Data 
WITH CHECK 
ADD CONSTRAINT ck_dateFormatted CHECK (dbo.VerifyDateFormat(SV_Date) = 1) ;

Which assumes you've defined a function that returns 1 if the format matches the expectation.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you tell me how can I apply constraint/check? –  Peter Sep 21 '11 at 18:22
    
Updated with example and link to alter table syntax –  billinkc Sep 21 '11 at 18:33

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