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class That {
    protected String nm() {
        return "That";
    }
}

class More extends That {
    protected String nm() {
        return "More";
    }

    protected void printNM() {
        That sref = super;

        System.out.println("this.nm() = " + this.nm());
        System.out.println("sref.nm() = " + sref.nm());
        System.out.println("super.nm() = " + super.nm());
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new More().printNM();
    }
}

When trying to compile More.java I'm getting 4 errors:

More.java:7: error: '.' expected
                That sref = super;
                                 ^
More.java:7: error: ';' expected
                That sref = super;
                                  ^
More.java:9: error: illegal start of expression
                System.out.println("this.nm() = " + this.nm());
                      ^
More.java:9: error: ';' expected
                System.out.println("this.nm() = " + this.nm());
                          ^
4 errors

Is something wrong with the code? (It's from the book "The Java Programming Language" p.62)

EDIT: From the book: "And here is the output of printNM:

this.nm() = More
sref.nm() = More
super.nm() = That

So either they're using some deprecated super-feature(I think this is the first edition of the book) or it is a typo and maybe they meant: "That sref = new More()"

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1  
super() instead of super –  Kit Ho Sep 21 '11 at 18:37
1  
@"Kit Ho" No, printNM() is a method, not a constructor. –  sadsadasssssa Sep 21 '11 at 18:39

3 Answers 3

You can't use super that way. Either use it in a constructor, with brackets - super() or super.method() (or in generics)

In your case this keyword shouldn't be there. If you want an instance of the super class, just have

That sref = new That();
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Change : That sref = super; to That sref = super();

This statement is basically trying to get hold of the object reference of the super class type, so you need to call the constructor for it - which is done using super().

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Simply stated, you can't. You probably could do some hacks through reflection, but side from that you can't do it. You need to know what class you're making your new Object. In this case, you have to make it new That().

share|improve this answer
    
But that code is "straight from the horse's mouth", what did Gosling mean to write? –  sadsadasssssa Sep 21 '11 at 18:42
    
You'll have to provide a citation if you want to involve the context of the statement. –  corsiKa Sep 21 '11 at 18:44
    
@sadsadasssssa: As far as I can tell, it has been miscopied. This fragment of code is in course notes at Cornell and (judging from the characters) somewhere in Korea and China, without the impossible super call. Whether this is in the original book of the OP, I can't guess. –  Andrew Lazarus Sep 21 '11 at 20:09

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