Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider standard algorithms like, say, std::for_each.

template<class InputIterator, class Function>
Function for_each(InputIterator first, InputIterator last, Function f);

As far as I can tell, there is actually no requirement placed on the relative states of the two InputIterator arguments.

Does that mean that the following is technically valid? Or is it undefined? What can I realistically expect it to do?

std::vector<int> v{0,1,2,3,4};
std::for_each(
   v.begin()+3,  // range [3,0)
   v.begin(),
   [](int){}
);

geordi tells me:

error: function requires a valid iterator range [__first, __last). [+ 13 discarded lines]

but I can't tell how compliant this debug diagnostic is.


I came up with this question when trying to pedantically determine how explicit is defined the behaviour of the following:

std::vector<int> v; // <-- empty
std::for_each(      // <-- total no-op? stated or just left to implication?
   v.begin(),
   v.end(),
   [](int){}
);
share|improve this question
    
+1. Good question.Never thought about this before. –  Nawaz Sep 21 '11 at 18:47
2  
Note: I do realise that the loop with the [3,0) range can never "work" as the first iterator is advanced. I also realise that reverse_iterators are the appropriate replacement. But I'm asking about the standard wording when it comes to this [usually broken] code. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 21 '11 at 18:49
    
If this became part of the standard, every interviewer would have to throw away a pretty good question. –  Pete Wilson Sep 21 '11 at 18:56
1  
@Pete: Note to all interviewers: get throwing. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 21 '11 at 18:57
1  
Just updated my answer, Indeed the book mentions this, Yet another reason for recommending the Josutils book :) –  Alok Save Sep 21 '11 at 19:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The standard explicitly requires the last iterator to be reachable from the first iterator. That means that by incrementing first one should be able to eventually hit last.

24.1 Iterator requirements

...

6 An iterator j is called reachable from an iterator i if and only if there is a finite sequence of applications of the expression ++i that makes i == j. If j is reachable from i, they refer to the same container.

7 Most of the library’s algorithmic templates that operate on data structures have interfaces that use ranges. A range is a pair of iterators that designate the beginning and end of the computation. A range [i, i) is an empty range; in general, a range [i, j) refers to the elements in the data structure starting with the one pointed to by i and up to but not including the one pointed to by j. Range [i, j) is valid if and only if j is reachable from i. The result of the application of functions in the library to invalid ranges is undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense. Where is that stated? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 21 '11 at 18:49
1  
Can you please provide a quote? I believe many things too... –  PlasmaHH Sep 21 '11 at 18:50
    
Ah, there is it. I was focusing on the Algorithms section and overlooked this bit when I scanned through Iterators. Thanks! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 21 '11 at 18:52
    
BTW, just to be explicit: when v is empty, for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), ...) is well-defined, i.e., it is ok for last to be the same as first. This follows from the standard wording because first is reachable from first in a finite sequence of increments, the finite sequence in this case being an empty one. –  ShreevatsaR Sep 22 '11 at 3:22

The result is Undefined.


C++03 Standard: 25.1.1 For each and
C++11 Standard: 25.2.4 For each states:

template<class InputIterator, class Function>
Function for_each(InputIterator first, InputIterator last, Function f);

1 Effects: Applies f to the result of dereferencing every iterator in the range [first, last), starting from first and proceeding to last - 1

While another section defines the valid range [first,last) as:

C++03 Standard: 24.1 Iterator requirements and
C++11 Standard: 24.2.1 Iterator requirements

Para 7 for both:

Most of the library’s algorithmic templates that operate on data structures have interfaces that use ranges.A range is a pair of iterators that designate the beginning and end of the computation. A range [i, i) is an empty range; in general, a range [i, j) refers to the elements in the data structure starting with the one pointed to by i and up to but not including the one pointed to by j. Range [i, j) is valid if and only if j is reachable from i. The result of the application of functions in the library to invalid ranges is undefined.


Having remembered of reading this somewhere, just browsed through:

C++ Standard Library - A Tutorial and Reference - By Nicolai Josutils

This finds a mention in:

5.4.1 Ranges
The caller must ensure that the first and second arguments define a valid range. This is the case if the end of the range is reachable from the beginning by iterating through the elements. This means, it is up to the programmer to ensure that both iterators belong to the same container and that the beginning is not behind the end. If this is not the case, the behavior is undefined and endless loops or forbidden memory access may result.

share|improve this answer
    
*cough* question is tagged c++11 :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 21 '11 at 18:57
    
@TomalakGeret'kal: Ahh, Darn I need to get used to referring n3290 and C++11, Seems I am still in C++03! Thanks though I updated the section details for both. –  Alok Save Sep 21 '11 at 19:03
    
Being overly pedantic, but if a bidirectional iterator is being used, wouldn't that mean the the range is, in fact, valid? The for_each algorithm is iterating in the wrong direction, but j is reachable from i if it goes the other way. –  Collin Dauphinee Sep 21 '11 at 19:07
    
@dauphic: The previous paragraph states it; reachable-ness considers increments only. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 21 '11 at 19:10
1  
Too much of bold text is not pleasing to the eye. Please use it less. :-) –  Nawaz Sep 22 '11 at 7:10

Does that mean that the following is technically valid? Or is it undefined? What can I realistically expect it to do?

No it is not. Your code would exhibit undefined behavior when for_each increments the iterator and that iterator would be pointing to end and there is nothing to dereference(Well, it is enough to get undefined behavior at this point, so there is no point talking about past end)!

share|improve this answer

This is explained by section 24.1 of the standard, "Iterator Requirements":

An iterator j is called reachable from an iterator i if and only if there is a finite sequence of applications of the expression ++i that makes i == j. If j is reachable from i, they refer to the same container.

Range [i, j) is valid if and only if j is reachable from i. The result of the application of functions in the library to invalid ranges is undefined.

So v.begin() + 3 is reachable from v.begin(), but not the reverse. So [v.begin()+3, v.begin()) is not a valid range, and your call to for_each is undefined.

share|improve this answer

The standard defines complexity constraints for the functions taking ranges. In the specific case of for_each (25.2.4 in the C++ standard):

Complexity: Applies f exactly last - first times

So it's effectively a no-op in your example.

share|improve this answer
    
Effectively, yea. I suppose this is about as explicit as I can hope for, really. Cheers. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 21 '11 at 18:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.