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Multiple selectors are used with delegate using the following:

$(contextElement).delegate('selector1, selector2' , 'eventName', function(){ //blabla });

In larger projects where managing DOM elements becomes crucial, storing the elements in variables that are binded to the window object becomes an attractive way to work.

However I can't join this way of working with using multiple selectors on the delegate method:

window.someControl = {
     contextElement = $('selector0'),
     DOMasProperty1 = $('selector1'),
     DOMasProperty2 = $('selector2')
}

someControl.contextElement.delegate(
'you magic answer for using DOMasProperty1 
and DOMasProperty2', 
'click', 
function(){ 

  //blabla 

});

Note: I am aware that the string value of the selector as oppose to its jQuery object can be stored in the someControl object. However I am storing the jQuery objects to improve the performance of the code and simply calling the string values over and over again will make this way of working not different to simply using the selector name wit the method.

I need an answer to somehow combine the use of delegate with reducing DOM lookups

share|improve this question
1  
@Rocket: What's wrong with a bit of humour? :) Referring to your edit, removing the "Thanks 256k" –  XGreen Sep 21 '11 at 20:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

jQuery objects have a .selector property that will refer to your original selector.

someControl.contextElement.delegate(
    window.someControl.DOMasProperty1.selector + ',' + 
    window.someControl.DOMasProperty2.selector,
    'click', 
    function(){ 

          //blabla 

    });

Note that it will work for:

DOMasProperty1 = $('selector1'),

...but probably not if you include DOM traversal methods like:

DOMasProperty1 = $('selector1').parent(),
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you patrick dw, I have to comment the same thing as I did for Sidnicious. Its looks really good and thanks for teaching me this selector method (useful for the future) but this way you bring back DOM lookups again back in the code. I need them to all be once and separate. –  XGreen Sep 21 '11 at 19:36
1  
@XGreen: No, it won't perform any more DOM lookups. But if you're going to use .delegate(), then since it is entirely selector based event delegation, it relies on a selector to run against the element within the context that received the event. You can't do it with an element or jQuery object. For that, you'd need to put together your own event delegation method that does a comparison to the element. –  user113716 Sep 21 '11 at 19:39

I'm not entirely clear on your question, but I might do something like this:

window.someControl = {
    contextElement: $('selector0'),
    selectors: ['selector1', 'selector2']
}

someControl.contextElement.delegate(someControl.selectors.join(','), 'click', function(){ 
    // …
});

Note that the syntax for creating objects JavaScript looks like this:

{
    key: value
}

Not like this:

{
    key = value
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is really good but you see, the underlying reason for storing the jQuery object as the value of the property is to reduce the number of DOM lookups by jQuery. Therefore if I start to store only the string value of the selector then it defeats the purpose of why it's done as the it doesn't improve the performance. –  XGreen Sep 21 '11 at 19:30
    
@XGreen: Actually, creating jQuery objects for .delegate() selectors won’t give you any performance gain — every time a click happens inside contextElement, .delegate() tests the target of the click against the selector (as a string). It will never use the jQuery objects you pre-create (except for contextElement). –  Sidnicious Sep 21 '11 at 21:52
    
I thought I could cache it in an object with a global scope. By defining a global container with jQuery results, so I can reference them from within other functions to reduce lookups –  XGreen Sep 21 '11 at 22:05
1  
It's actually slower to create jQuery objects for selectors which are only going to be used with .delegate(), because .delegate() never looks them up. Instead, it tests them against an event’s target element (and its parents) each time the event fires. That's why it only takes a string, and not a set of elements or a jQuery object. If you want to use DOMasProperty1 and DOMasProperty1 in other jQuery functions, feel free to cache them, but you must pass .delegate() a selector. –  Sidnicious Sep 22 '11 at 1:06
    
P.S. That’s also why .delegate() works even when matching elements get added to the document after you call it. It doesn’t rely on evaluating/caching a selector upfront. –  Sidnicious Sep 22 '11 at 1:10

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