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Let's say I have an integer, such as 2,734,465, and it is called intOne. How do I "break apart" that integer so that I can put the number in 7 UILabels? So, in the first label I will have 2, then in the second label I will have 7, and so on. How would I do this? Thanks for your help!

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Yes, but... my god.. why?! –  Ben Zotto Sep 21 '11 at 19:02
    
Just something I've been wondering... it's also a way to analyze the numbers that make up an integer. –  Jack Humphries Sep 21 '11 at 19:06
    
If you want to approach it more directly (and not shuttling to UI controls), consider repeatedly using division and modulus. E.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/66107/… –  Ben Zotto Sep 21 '11 at 19:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Convert it to a string using something like

NSString *intString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", myInt];

Then you can get the individual characters out:

myChar = [intString characterAtIndex: i];
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Awesome, thanks! –  Jack Humphries Sep 21 '11 at 19:01

Here's a different approach. This creates an array whose elements are the individual digits (and a preceding "-" if negative):

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

NSArray* brokenArrayWithInt(NSInteger intOne) {
    NSMutableArray *result = [[[NSMutableArray alloc] init] autorelease];
    BOOL isNegative = NO;
    if (intOne < 0) {
        isNegative = YES;
        intOne = -intOne;
    }
    do {
        [result insertObject:[NSNumber numberWithInteger:intOne % 10] atIndex:0];
        intOne /= 10;
    } while (intOne > 0);

    if (isNegative) {
        [result insertObject:@"-" atIndex:0];
    }
    return result;
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    NSArray *brokenArray = brokenArrayWithInt(2734465);
    NSLog(@"Array: %@", brokenArray);
    brokenArray = brokenArrayWithInt(-2734465);
    NSLog(@"Array: %@", brokenArray);
    brokenArray = brokenArrayWithInt(0);
    NSLog(@"Array: %@", brokenArray);
    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

Here's the result:

Running…
2011-09-21 12:28:52.531 so7505138[6739:a0f] Array: (
    2,
    7,
    3,
    4,
    4,
    6,
    5
)
2011-09-21 12:28:52.533 so7505138[6739:a0f] Array: (
    "-",
    2,
    7,
    3,
    4,
    4,
    6,
    5
)
2011-09-21 12:28:52.533 so7505138[6739:a0f] Array: (
    0
)
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After you have the string you may also use:

 NSString *keyStr = [intString substringWithRange:NSMakeRange (i, j)];

to get a substring directly

As an alternative to string manipulation this is how you break the number n apart mathematically:

 int n = 1357246;
    int digit;
    int divisor;
    for (int i = log10(n); i> 0; i--) {
        divisor = pow(10,i);

        digit = n / divisor;
        n = n - digit*divisor;
        NSLog(@"%i ",digit);
    }
      NSLog(@"%i ",n);
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It depends if you want the number to pick up the relevant locale specific formatting for e.g. thousand separators and decimal point. If you do, then turn it to a string and then extract characters as others have suggested.

If you want to get the value of each decimal digit, then you divide modulo 10, 100, 1000 etc, starting from the power of 10 that is less than the total value (e.g. for 213, start with 100, then 10, then 1)

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Cast the integer into a string - then use a method to split/substring the string into 7 strings. Or the amount which you require. Put a string in each label.

Start off with [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", myNum];

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2  
casting an int to a NSString * in C will turn it into a pointer into oblivion, access to which will crash the program –  bshirley Sep 21 '11 at 20:41
    
@bshirley, For real? Would that crash the program? Weird how all my apps still work... –  LouwHopley Sep 22 '11 at 4:54
    
The edit you added is not a cast. NSString *string = (NSString *)myNum is casting and int to a string. Your code does safely convert an int to a NSString *. –  bshirley Sep 22 '11 at 12:54

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