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What old technology that should have been replaced long ago do you still use regularly, and why?

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locked by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 6:08

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 6:08

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<pedantry>I think you mean deprecated (superseded or out of date), rather than obsolete (no longer used or useful). By definition, if you're using something it isn't obsolete. </pedantry> –  Unsliced Apr 15 '09 at 8:42
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I am really annoyed that this question has been closed! –  Ola Eldøy Apr 16 '09 at 0:05
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I am really annoyed that this question was asked...what purpose does it serve? –  Jonathan Sampson Aug 26 '09 at 14:13
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@Kelly French: Signal to noise ratio. To paraphrase the FAQ, "this is a site for programming questions that can be answered." In my opinion, this question does not match the criteria and would probably be more welcome at superuser.com . –  Piskvor Aug 26 '09 at 18:38

136 Answers 136

Comment on VBScript post above ... (new here, can't comment yet) and the general (ongoing) sorry state of scripting on Windows.

For my occasional scripting needs, I use VBScript, and it is absolutely obsolete. It can't natively communicate with newish .NET stuff without a COM layer - and we fled to .NET to avoid COM. However, like batch files and rain on Saturdays, it's always there. I also use a lot of batch files and, strangely, enjoy it much more than VBScript.

A batch file knows it's obsolete, and revels in it. Batch transcends obsolete to venerability.

PowerShell is theoretically a replacement. All the technical pieces are in place, it's fast and potent ... but few people can stand looking at it long enough to learn it. ("-gt", what were they thinking?).

JScript 8 could be a replacement, but someone forgot that scripting languages ought to be dynamic - Jscript 8 needs compilation as far as I can see.

I'm pushing my team / company to embrace IronPython and DLR in general. You can get your old COM, your newish WMI, your .NET, and get the immediate gratification that "scripting" should provide. I want to script IronPython, moving anything heavy off to C# libs. That's the dream ... the reality is that I know everyone can use JScript / VBScript / batch out of the box. Makes a guy want to switch to Unix.

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Apache Axis 1. It is full of bugs and really limited.

It is deprecated by Axis2, which has only the name in common with Axis1 : total API rewrite. I gave up the migration after 3 weeks of tears.

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Microsoft SQL Server 2000, though we are slowly migrating to 2005...

Until early last year our Java source was running against JDK 1.3, but I got us up to 1.6.

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Classic ASP & Visual Basic 6.0.

We don't seem to get the budget or time to migrate fast enough...

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I'm not sure that it "should have been replaced", but I still have my working copy of Brief (the DOS editor) and still us it quite regularly.

Note - I'm referring to the version produced by Underware (the original maker), and NOT the P.O.S. version that Borland put after buying them up - prior to killing it.

I spent a lot of time in the mid-80's learning the macro language, and made a lot of really useful macros for it - and still use many of them today under Windows XP (in the command window).

-R

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Slackware Linux. The whole distribution fits on a single floppy.

I built a home automation system years ago. The computer is a 66 MHz 486DX2 PC with 16 MB of memory. It comes with some special hardware so it's too much trouble to upgrade. Tried new Linux distributions but the machine is not powerful enough to run any of them.

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C89. I'm sure if I look for it, I'll find some awful K&R crawling horror lurking somewhere in this pile. Better not go there.

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Visual Basic 6.0 and PowerBuilder 10.

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AppleWorks 6.0 on System 7, inside the Basilisk II Macintosh emulator on my Linux laptop.

Beats OpenOffice at speed, reliability, and pretty much everything else.

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Ada.

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What version? If you are talking Ada 83, I agree (since there have been two revs since then, and another on the way). The newer versions, I'd have to disagree entirely. Ada has stuff that they are just now getting around to putting into the newest C++ standard (eg: real "for" loops), and stuff they are only now starting to consider for future standards (eg: concurrency support). Ada's only "out of date" if you mean ahead of its date. –  T.E.D. Mar 31 '11 at 14:30

REXX. I still use it for small text parsing tasks. I have yet to find a replacement for the extremely powerful stem variables in any other language.

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HyperCard and Macintosh System 6.

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Delphi 4. Our software still uses it, and it's too much work to retool it in anything else.

It makes you appreciate what you have nowadays. Probably the only thing worse would be older versions of Borland C++ builder, a horrible amalgamation of Delphi and C++.

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COBOL, CICS, and ADABASE :D

Yes, some people still have to program in COBOL

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Silicon - I mean it's so 1955!

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At my previous job, we still used visual studio 2003 / .Net 1.1

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FoxPro 2.6 for DOS for one old and large program complex. It's laughable, but it's true. We have no time to reconstruct it using new technologies. Even more laughable fact is that often I wonder at speed of FoxPro, especially in comparison with modern "multitier" systems :)

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IBM OS/2 version 1.3

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Buckle spring keyboard.

Yes, the machine gun keyboard from IBM. Bought a new one with USB connector and additional keys. Love it. Every single keystroke is a tiny pleasure.

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A bank card without a chip. And even if you have one with a chip, nobody have the device to read it.

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Hummingbird DM 5.1.0.5 which is I believe at least 5 years old now and should be replaced. This is used for holding support documents and legal documents which has to connect to our new CMS. There is an old COM DLL that is used to handle logging in to Hummingbird as well as getting out the data which can include information about the files as well as the binary data itself.

MCMS 2002 which is our old CMS that is being replaced soon. The company just had other things that took the spotlight so the new CMS project has had its schedule revised at least a few times and there has been a couple rounds of training with only a few people getting it twice. Since this has some of the data from the sites we are replacing, there has been work to get an extraction from it done which can be painful.

Both of these are on Windows 2000 servers that are a few years old and can be a bit fussy to use at times.

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Access 97. And all the VBA that goes with it.

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4GL...

We're in an ongoing never ending process to get it all into C#.

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Sybase's APT Workbench - a ncurses-like text based user interface to databases ;-)

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VBScript - I should be using PowerShell instead right?

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I know some companies which are still using Microsoft Access 97 for their applications. (But they are planning to upgrade to Access 2003 - :-) )

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Everywhere I go I seem to be maintaining an old Access-VBA application that has been upsized to Microsoft SQL Server.

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At work, not my fault :)

  • DB2 / zOS / COBOL
  • A unicore laptop w/2GB
  • .NET 2.0
  • VSS 2005
  • VS 2003
  • VS 2005
  • SQL 2000

And sometimes, even... shudder - paper.

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