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What old technology that should have been replaced long ago do you still use regularly, and why?

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locked by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 6:08

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 6:08

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<pedantry>I think you mean deprecated (superseded or out of date), rather than obsolete (no longer used or useful). By definition, if you're using something it isn't obsolete. </pedantry> –  Unsliced Apr 15 '09 at 8:42
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I am really annoyed that this question has been closed! –  Ola Eldøy Apr 16 '09 at 0:05
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I am really annoyed that this question was asked...what purpose does it serve? –  Jonathan Sampson Aug 26 '09 at 14:13
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@Kelly French: Signal to noise ratio. To paraphrase the FAQ, "this is a site for programming questions that can be answered." In my opinion, this question does not match the criteria and would probably be more welcome at superuser.com . –  Piskvor Aug 26 '09 at 18:38

136 Answers 136

up vote 31 down vote accepted

RCS. Before I check in changes to a "RCS like" repository, I email the whole group with the list of files I modified and see if anyone is also checking in the same files today so we don't overwrite each other's changes. Don't laugh... this isn't funny if you have to do it everyday :..(

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Wow, seriously? Switching version control systems is one of the easier things to do within an organization. –  Ryan McGeary Aug 26 '09 at 13:26
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Actually, I use RCS on a daily basis without any bad thoughts whatsoever - for backing up configuration files on my machine prior to updates. (Gentoo Linux "dispatch-conf" even does this automatically.) For local-only, one-person-only use, RCS is definitely good enough. –  DevSolar Aug 26 '09 at 13:46
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You should give cvs, svn a pass and directly use Git. –  Lakshman Prasad Oct 20 '09 at 15:33

Visual SourceSafe, true devil incarnate:

alt text

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Is that the chick from The Office? –  Simucal Apr 15 '09 at 7:35
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LOL ever noticed that she is wearing red and seems to have 2 horns growing out of her head.... eck! –  littlegeek Apr 15 '09 at 7:49
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@Jeff All the best! –  Anton Gogolev Apr 15 '09 at 11:58
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at least it's 2005, I have to work with the older versions.... –  Mafti Apr 15 '09 at 14:17
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I hate you VSS. YOU HAVE ONE JOB, KEEP MY SOURCE SAFE! DO YOU DO THAT, NOOOOOOOOOOO! IT'S IN YOUR #$%@#%^#$# NAME: "source" "safe"!!! AAAAAARRGGH! –  Aardvark Apr 15 '09 at 14:22

Internet Explorer 6. Our corporate standard !!??

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That makes me sad to hear... –  bendewey Apr 15 '09 at 15:03
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Change corporations. –  jmucchiello Apr 15 '09 at 17:40
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Our school! Especially the lack of transparent PNGs... ouch. –  Lucas Jones Apr 16 '09 at 14:52
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We just switched to IE7 about 3 weeks ago. What a joke. –  Stewbob Aug 26 '09 at 13:57

cmd.exe - Quite possibly the worst command-line interface out there, but it's available on every Windows machine.

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"every7 Windows machine"; it depends how far back you go... ;-p –  Marc Gravell Apr 15 '09 at 11:55
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better ones? regardless of platform? how about bash, zsh etc... –  Maximiliano Guzman Apr 15 '09 at 16:53
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@Marc - pretty far from today. –  ldigas May 13 '09 at 20:28
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Whenever I have to dev on Windows machines Cygwin gets installed first. –  Jon W Aug 26 '09 at 17:26
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@Jweede: Yeah, I honestly believe that Cygwin is possibly the best thing Windows has got going for it these days :) –  Dan Moulding Aug 31 '09 at 23:15

Notepad...

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Why? Why do you do that? There are so many alternatives out there and every single one of them is better ;-) –  Joachim Sauer Apr 15 '09 at 13:08
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Nothing wrong with Notepad –  Rory Becker Apr 16 '09 at 8:26
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Rory, nothing right with it! :) –  hasenj Apr 17 '09 at 0:02
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How notepad is better than "other apps": 1. Available on any default installation of Windows. 2. Faster load time. 3. Best unicode support. 4. Less clumsy and confusing menu system. –  CDR May 3 '09 at 6:31
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@CDR "Faster load time" only if you're opening a small file or creating a new one. Try opening a 10MB log file in Notepad :P –  Davy8 May 13 '09 at 21:44

Windows batch files.

I use them because they're extremely easy to deploy, even though the language is embarrassingly awful.

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If people knew and appreciated how much mission critical operational software at multi-billion dollar corporations was written in batch the DOW would probably drop 30% overnight. –  Wedge Apr 15 '09 at 9:36
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batch is obsolete like bash is obsolete -1 –  PintSizedCat Apr 15 '09 at 15:15
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Modern Windows OSes have much more advanced scripting capabilities than DOS batch files. Windows Script Host for example allows use of JScript and VBScript. Windows is not DOS-based anymore. –  Calvin Apr 15 '09 at 16:16
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@PintSizedCat: Bash isn't obsolete. It is a fully-fledged scripting language in it's own right. It isn't even bad! –  Lucas Jones Apr 16 '09 at 14:52
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Type 'title poop haha' in a cmd window sometime –  justinhj Apr 20 '09 at 17:35

Visual Basic 6.0. Not really obsolete, but embarrassingly horrible.

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I wish I knew enough to know what's embarassingly horrible about vb6 cos I think it's great. –  kjack Apr 15 '09 at 13:20
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Well the editor for one thing, no mouse scroll courses no end of pain. The way it dynamically search for .dll and .ocx files each time you open the project, thus the project files changes, then then break your build machine. The bloody annoying auto compile with it's modal pop-up. –  Simeon Pilgrim Apr 15 '09 at 20:42
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I generally stick in a dummy var to avoid the message, but you can turn it off at Tools -> options, uncheck "auto syntax check" (Thanks to MarkJ for this tip) –  kjack Apr 15 '09 at 23:17
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Argg, don't solve the simple hates, I still refuse to be happy, we hates it. We hates it my precious. –  Simeon Pilgrim Apr 16 '09 at 8:41
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I can't believe VB6 is still around, and that people are still using it. Once you let go of it, it becomes like a bad movie you saw years ago. I did nothing but VB from 1995 to 2005, and yesterday I got down-voted for getting a VB6 question totally wrong. Felt great. :) –  MusiGenesis Oct 13 '09 at 0:16

PVCS splash screen

PVCS, the Polytron Version Control System. Over 20 years old and barely changed in that time. It's actually older than CVS.

But we're on version 6.7.11, which was updated only 8 years ago, and even comes with a Java 1.3.0 GUI client!

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whaaaaaaaaat? :) :) –  dfa Apr 16 '09 at 9:09
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That graphic is awesome. –  Min Apr 20 '09 at 17:37
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I hate PVCS. All it does is get in your way. DAMN YOU PVCS. –  moffdub May 3 '09 at 6:42
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Wow...I didn't know anyone still used that monstrosity. At a previous employer, we actually had one guy on staff who did nothing but babysit our PVCS install. –  Matt Peterson Aug 26 '09 at 13:50

HTML tables.

I just really don't care what it looks like if I'm the only person that needs to look at it.

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It's actually a good idea to use tables, especially when you want the browser to render a table ;-) –  Tim Büthe Apr 15 '09 at 7:56
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giveupandusetables.com –  Mark Renouf Apr 15 '09 at 12:50
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For large-scale layouts, the (superior) alternative is CSS, but that does not mean you now have to use CSS instead of <table> everywhere. It's still perfectly OK to use <table> when you need, ya know, a table! Like, for displaying lots of data in rows and columns... –  Michael Borgwardt Apr 15 '09 at 15:01
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Using tables for layout gives me a double hit of joy. First, the guilty pleasure of doing something I'm not supposed to; second, the satisfaction at actually being able to get it to look the same in 7 browsers. –  Alex May 1 '09 at 23:23

Windows XP

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The question asked for "embarrassingly obsolete". I don't think it's embarrassing to be using the last good version of a Windows operating system. –  David Koelle Apr 15 '09 at 15:53
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old does not equal obsolete –  Tester101 Apr 15 '09 at 17:33
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Surely "should have been replaced" implies obsolete? –  Blorgbeard Apr 17 '09 at 0:16
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Whatever...XP is obsolete, old, out of date and needs replacing! :0 –  dotjoe Apr 17 '09 at 1:35
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@dotjoe: I Disagree - So far I have not heard any good reason to replace it. –  Treb May 5 '09 at 9:54

Paper, especially for typography proofing: an LCD just can't compete with that kind of DPI and contrast.

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I'm tempted to upvote this. But then again, I don't consider paper to be remotely obsolete. It still has many advantages. –  Wedge Apr 15 '09 at 9:33
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Paper has some advantages that e-media cannot overcome. You can read papers while sitting in the throne room, with no danger of short-circuiting any text... –  Tim Apr 15 '09 at 10:31
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Paper is not obsolete or deprecated! Nothing better has ever come along to replace it. –  David Koelle Apr 15 '09 at 15:52

My wife...

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...until his wife reads it –  Manos Dilaverakis Apr 15 '09 at 9:34
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...then he becomes obsolete too. –  Tim Apr 15 '09 at 10:32
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Hey at least she's not open source –  Mike Robinson May 13 '09 at 20:26
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But if she were open source, you could just fork her and go about your business. –  Chris Farmer Jun 12 '09 at 18:01
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Thanks for the Wikipedia link, needed that... –  Aardvark Aug 26 '09 at 17:07

I find myself using Microsoft Calculator, even if I'm working in Excel!

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hehe Nice one :) –  ThorHalvor Apr 15 '09 at 13:13
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calc is my #2 most used app on my start menu. second only to notepad. –  Jayrox Apr 15 '09 at 16:40
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I pit download.microsoft.com/download/whistler/Install/2/WXP/EN-US/… over any calculator any day. the hex conversions and rudimentary graphing alone are worth it. –  Arnshea Apr 17 '09 at 0:36

Minesweeper.

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I love minesweeper...greatest game ever... –  Daud Ahmad Apr 15 '09 at 9:44
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While playing you can use the excuse you are working on solving an NP complete problem (see for.mat.bham.ac.uk/R.W.Kaye/minesw/ordmsw.htm) –  Simon Nickerson Apr 20 '09 at 18:31
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Why is Minesweeper obsolete? What has replaced it? –  DisgruntledGoat Aug 26 '09 at 14:43

My Iomega ZIP drive with 100 MB disks...

I think because of some twisted psychological romantic flaw in me.

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It's like playing Russian Roulette with your data! –  cloudymusic Apr 15 '09 at 16:04
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You do realize you can get 2 GB USB Drives at Walmart for $10. –  Kibbee Apr 15 '09 at 17:07
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Yes, but they don't fizz, and twizzle, and rinzchrinsch when I insert them.. –  sharkin Apr 15 '09 at 17:38
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Change the "new hardware detected" sound on your desktop... –  jmucchiello Apr 15 '09 at 17:44

Classic ASP...I itch uncontrollably and start to shake every time I have to maintain one of those pages rather than rewriting it in ASP.NET!

We have 3K+ pages just sitting out there right now.

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Funny enough I think writing Classic ASP is so much quicker for dirty tasks then writing ASP.NET. It's like writing perl to hack something instead of writing a .NET application with the all compiling overhead and other complexity of it. –  dr. evil Apr 15 '09 at 8:21

HTML and CSS.

They are defective by design. So many years have gone by and the committee responsible for their development hasn't done their job to fix and improve them.

Requirements of these days stretched HTML/CSS far over their limits. And there are still no alternatives.

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actually, they are not defective by design, only the whole community abused and raped html for new stuff. the whole http-protocol needs to be dumped and a new one created –  Mafti Apr 15 '09 at 14:16
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The creators of HTML and CSS failed to really take into account that people might want to design web pages. The deficiencies of html and CSS are obvious to anyone who has attempted even the most modest of designs. –  Breton Apr 16 '09 at 6:31
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Since HTML was created with the idea of NOT specifying any design (which was a sensible idea back then), I don't consider it to be defective. We just constantly try to use it for something it was not designed for - that's our fault, not HTML's. –  Treb May 5 '09 at 10:00
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There are plenty of fundamentals flaws in the HTML spec, even without people abusing it. HTML is a horrible standard (if you can even call it that, since it doesn't really standardize much, only tell you what you "should" do, if you're in a good mood. Oh, and let's not ignore all the contradictions inherent in the specs for making it XHTML compatible. (such as <br/> actually having a different meaning in "actual" HTML - which no browser implements, for obvious reasons). Yes, it is broken. And that is why people abuse it, which in turn helps keep it broken. –  jalf Jun 12 '09 at 18:07

The old unreliable floppy disk.

alt text

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Back in the day, if I had to move data across town, I would make 2 or three copies of a floppy b/c by the time I got to the destination at least one of those floppies would have a read error. –  CLaRGe Apr 15 '09 at 15:14
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My son built his first PC for his 14th birthday. He didn't even want a floppy. I was sad. :-) –  CLaRGe Apr 15 '09 at 19:18
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Reliable, feh. I never had a 5.25" disk spontaneously go bad. 3.5", all the time. –  Jeffrey Hantin Apr 16 '09 at 1:45
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CD/DVD drive is now obsolute like the floppy. Everyone now uses the USB flash drive. –  CDR May 3 '09 at 6:36
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I've still got 25-odd blanks in a drawer. Can't remember the last time I saw a floppy drive however... It dawns on me that best way for the government to keep its secrets safe would be to store them on floppies. Next time they leave one on a train the kids would have no idea what to do with it ;) –  Delameko Aug 26 '09 at 17:17

Pen and paper.

It isn't because computer interfaces aren't good enough (though that's an important consideration). The main reason is that it just seems more human. Another reason is that, while they have their own failings, pen and paper can't be hacked, can't crash, and remove that dangerous temptation to get the computer to help you out.

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If you are dyslexic, pen / pencil and paper CAN crash ... –  Tim Post Apr 15 '09 at 8:46
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-1 Not remotely obsolete. –  Pete Kirkham Apr 15 '09 at 9:16
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Be awed, then: multicians.org/andre.html –  Artelius Apr 16 '09 at 23:52

I still have a VCR in my living room (although I don't use it much these days).

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Visual C++ 6.0 compilers!

Many people on SO really wondered about this.

Reason for not replacing-- Hmmm... I have not spoken to my manager yet!

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The language accepted by VC6, and also other details such as workarounds for stl bugs and the way it loads DLLs, means a VC6 codebase requires significant effort to port to C++. Most VC6 apps pre-date common use of unit testing, so it really can be a high risk, complicated exercise. –  Pete Kirkham Apr 15 '09 at 9:19

8051 microcontrollers. They date from the late 70's or early 80's but are now just so cheap and available plus I have so many pre-written libraries for them it would be daft to use any other micro for low end jobs.

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8051 will outlive us. –  Marcelo MD Apr 18 '09 at 15:14
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We worked on an 8051 in my Embedded Systems course. I can see why they're popular. –  rlbond Aug 26 '09 at 17:37
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There are better 8-bit MCUs available - like the HC08, a direct descendant of of the 6800, which itself predates the 6502, which was in widespread use in the 1970s. Self-contained HC08s are available for about $1 each in quantity. –  Chromatix Apr 3 '10 at 7:38

QWERTY.

It should have been replaced long, long ago... the reason I still use it is obvious...

Funnily enough I'm typing this answer in Dvorak because I accidentally switched to Dvorak mode a few minutes ago.

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Why is DVORAK better than QWERTY? –  Alix Axel Aug 26 '09 at 15:53
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@eyze because qwerty was made to slow you down and because, uh, there are lots of studies that WEREN'T headed by Dvorak that prove it! Wait, nevermind, that stuff is false. –  TM. Aug 26 '09 at 17:09
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Just a random example: everytHinG cApitALizeD in tHiS Sentence iS on tHe Home row in qwerty. EvEryTHINg cApITAlIzED IN THIS SENTENcE IS ON THE HOmE rOw IN DvOrAk. Whether or not this translates to a real difference, I can't prove. But with Dvorak at least I know that actual research was behind the design... –  Artelius Aug 28 '09 at 10:46
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The one thing I don't like about Dvorak is all the questions I get about why the 6 keys in the top left corner doesn't spell Dvorak. –  Marius Oct 13 '09 at 1:01

My mouse. It should have been replaced by a Minority-Report-Fullbody-ShufflOMatic long ago.

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win32.hlp win32.hlp

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I still prefer these guys to HTML-based help. –  MusiGenesis Oct 13 '09 at 0:24
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My first reaction was that WinMain is the obsolete technology you use! –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin May 11 '10 at 9:51
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Indeed, the .HLP systems tended to be MUCH better than their comparative HTML-based help systems. –  Shark8 Aug 30 '11 at 1:27

Delphi 6.

Because Borland/Inprise/CodeGear/WhateverItsCalledNow thoroughly lost its way after Delphi 7 and I was only upgrading on the alternative releases. I did buy Delphi 2005 but never upgraded anything to it as the hassle was simply not worth the effort (so what a waste of GBP 300 that was). I still have several Win32 programs for clients in Delphi 6 and apart from a certain aging of the interface they work as well as they ever did.

IMHO Delphi is still the best native Win32 environment out there. Blindingly fast compiler, properly structured language and does 99.8% of everything you can do in C++ without all the development overheads of that.

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Yep, D7 was best. I hate the fact that they don't release Personal Editions any more. I'm cheap... :(. But I downloaded Turbo Pascal from their (Borland's) "Antique Software" site. It's quite good, actually... –  Lucas Jones Apr 16 '09 at 14:56

Around 2000, I was using a TRS-80 Model 4P (an ancient Z80A system with floppy drives, expandable to a whopping 128K of memory, which was addressable by bank switching, IIRC) in a vital role in Unix development.

Specifically, I put it in front of the outlet so I wouldn't knock the plug for the Unix system out of the wall when I stretched my feet. It worked very well.

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Borland C++ 3.1

;)

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Visual InterDev 6.0, talking via FrontPage extensions to Visual SourceSafe.

It is so hunkered that if any of the config breaks, we're not sure that we can put it back together again...

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1  
@Earwicker- TFS is a beast to upgrade in an easy manner. –  RichardOD Aug 26 '09 at 13:46

Lotus Notes. :-(

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