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I came across a fun math problem yesterday and have it solved, but with the code I wrote, I had to do a keyboard interrupt or it would run forever, lol. So I changed it to have an end condition, but now it only prints 1 solution and stops.

The problem goes like this: "You have the numbers 123456789, in that order. Between each number, you must insert either nothing, a plus sign, or a multiplication sign, so that the resulting expression equals 2002. Write a program that prints all solutions. (There are two.)"

import random


def try1(param):
    global solved
    opers = ['+', '*', '']
    hotpotato = ('%s'.join(param) % (random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     )
             )
    if eval(hotpotato) == 2002:
        solved += 1
        print "Solution:", hotpotato, "= 2002     :-)"

    else:
        pass


solved = 0
while solved == 0:
    try1('123456789')

This code prints the first solution it encounters and stops. Can anyone tell me how to get it to print both solutions before it stops?

share|improve this question
    
Is this from Project Euler? –  Blender Sep 21 '11 at 20:38
1  
@Blender If it is, I haven't seen it there. –  Shon Freelen Sep 21 '11 at 20:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Store your solutions in a set:

solutions = set([])

Each time a solution is found, update the set:

solutions.append(solution)

Sets are nice because there don't store duplicates:

>>> len(set([1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]))
1

So just loop until the set's size is greater than one:

while len(solved) < 2:
    try1('123456789')

Also, you can shorten this code:

hotpotato = ('%s'.join(param) % (random.choice(opers),
                                 random.choice(opers),
                                 random.choice(opers),
                                 random.choice(opers),
                                 random.choice(opers),
                                 random.choice(opers),
                                 random.choice(opers),
                                 random.choice(opers),
                                 )
         )

To this:

hotpotato = ('%s'.join(param) % (random.choice(opers) for i in range(8))))
share|improve this answer
    
I haven't learned about sets, yet. Now seems like a great time. I'll be right back with an accept for your answer. –  Shon Freelen Sep 21 '11 at 20:45
2  
Just as a suggestion, I'd try doing this brute-force instead of randomly. It'll run faster and will be scalable (your program finds a solution with a 1 / 3^8 = 0.00015 chance per run, which means that you have an expected run count of 3^8 = 6,561 before all solutions are found. –  Blender Sep 21 '11 at 20:50
    
Did you test the shortened code? I tried something like that before I expanded it out, and it didn't pass the proper number of arguments to the string formatter. Your code did the same for me, unfortunately. –  Shon Freelen Sep 21 '11 at 21:26
    
Try replacing 8 with 9 or 7. Maybe that would work. –  Blender Sep 21 '11 at 22:19
    
Neither worked. It looks like the string formatter needs all the arguments at once, and when we use the generator it's sending the formatter 1 argument and telling it to do it's work, which it can't since it only got 1 argument. Lol, sorry I've only been doing this a few months. –  Shon Freelen Sep 21 '11 at 22:37

Don't use random, enumerate all possible operator combinations (well, you can cut the search space a bit, if the first couple of numbers the result is larger than 2002, there is no way the result is going to be smaller). itertools is your friend.

If you do that, your program will finish in no time.

If you know that there are exactly two solutions you can return the solution from try1 and do the loop till you collected two different solutions, but that's not really elegant, is it?

share|improve this answer
    
3**8 == 6561 (cartesian product of eight ("", "+", "*") ), so there is no practical need to cut the search space. –  tzot Oct 9 '11 at 1:35

The solution to your problem is, breaking when solved == 2.

But your code's real problem is using random. Using random in an algorithm is generally a bad idea. There is a possibility that your code lasts over a century.

There is much simplier and faster way using itertools:

import itertools

for s in itertools.product(("+", "*", ""), repeat=8):
    z = itertools.izip_longest("123456789", s, fillvalue="")
    e = "".join(itertools.chain.from_iterable(z))

    if eval(e) == 2002:
        print(e)

There is no need to break when two solutions found, because the code already completes in 0.2 seconds :).

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I was going to correct you, and then I grokked the alternative way in which you are interspersing the symbols between the digits. Very nice :) –  Karl Knechtel Sep 21 '11 at 21:54

For the record, I would encourage a different approach to search for the solutions, such as suggested in Andy T's answer or yi_H's answer. That said, this answer addresses the issue presented in the question.

The code you present will run until one answer is found and stop, since finding the first answer will make solved not equal 0. Since you know there are 2 solutions, you can change your while loop condition:

while solved < 2:
    try1('123456789')

In response to Mark's comment that this can lead to duplicated answers, here is code which will make sure you get different solutions:

import random
def try1(param):
    global solved
    try1.prev_soln = []
    opers = ['+', '*', '']
    hotpotato = ('%s'.join(param) % (random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     random.choice(opers),
                                     )
             )
    if eval(hotpotato) == 2002:
        if hotpotato not in try1.prev_soln:
            solved += 1
            try1.prev_soln.append(hotpotato)
            print "Solution:", hotpotato, "= 2002     :-)"    
    else:
        pass

solved = 0
while solved < 2:
    try1('123456789')

Of course, this approach assumes 2 solutions. If you had an unknown number of solutions you would not know when to stop, thus my recommendation for another approach to finding the solutions.

share|improve this answer
3  
But note as you are testing random permtuations your two solutions might be the same. –  Mark Sep 21 '11 at 20:37
    
And that's exactly what I ran into. I ran the code 20-ish times and it always returned the same solution. –  Shon Freelen Sep 21 '11 at 20:44
    
@Shon Freelen: The updated answer should solve the problem of getting the same solution. –  GreenMatt Sep 21 '11 at 20:48
1  
A small nit: You don't need global prev_soln because you're not binding anything new to that name in try1(). –  Greg Hewgill Sep 21 '11 at 20:51
    
@Shon Freelen: you receive the same solution each run because you haven't randomized your random numbers, use random.seed() –  Andy T Sep 21 '11 at 20:52

To receive both (all) solutions you need completely different approach to solve this problem. Check all permutations of inserted operations. How to calculate permutations are shown here: http://www.bearcave.com/random_hacks/permute.html

EDIT:

Example:

ops = ['+', '*']

def gen(ver, i):
    if i == len(ver):
        return
    for op in ops:
        ver = ver[:i] + op + ver[i:]
        if eval(ver) == 2002:
            yield ver
        for j in range(i + 2, len(ver)):
            for sol in gen(ver, j):
                yield sol
        ver = ver[:i] + ver[i+1:]

for sol in gen("123456789", 1):
    print "solution:", sol

Output:

solution: 1*2+34*56+7+89
solution: 1*23+45*6*7+89
share|improve this answer
    
added an example –  Andy T Sep 21 '11 at 23:36

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