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Please Consider :

Needs["ErrorBarPlots`"];

fixNumberF1F6 = {{{7.11`, 7.51`, 11.14`, 8.19`, 6.58`}, 
                  {2.14`, 2.33`,2.25`, 1.53`,1.71`}},               
                  {{4.69`, 4.79`, 3.78,4.34`, 4.8`}, 
                   {2.22`, 2.71`, 3.18`, 2.29`, 1.93`}}}

fixNumberF1F6[[1,1]] refers to the mean fixation number for each subject for condition 1, fixNumberF1F6[[1,2]] the standard Deviation of those means. fixNumberF1F6[[2]] refers to condition 2.

plotOptionsXX[title_, yName_, xName_, colors_: Black] :=

  {Frame -> {{True, False}, {True, False}},
   PlotStyle -> colors,
   PlotLabel -> 
   Style[title, Bold, 14, Opacity[1], FontFamily -> "Helvetica"],
   PlotStyle -> Directive[Black, PointSize[Medium]],
   PlotRangePadding -> 0,
   Frame -> {{True, False}, {True, False}},
   LabelStyle -> Directive[Black, Bold, 12],
   FrameLabel -> {{Style[yName, Opacity[1]], 
   None}, {Style[xName, Opacity[1]], None}},
   FrameStyle -> Opacity[0],
   FrameTicksStyle -> Opacity[1],
   AxesStyle -> Directive[Black, 12],
   ImageSize -> laTaille};

ErrorListPlot[fixNumberF1F6[[#]] // Transpose,
              PlotRange -> {{0, 6}, {0, 15}},
              ImageSize -> 300,
              FrameTicks ->{{Range[1, 13, 2], None},{{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, None}},
              PlotStyle -> Directive[Black, AbsolutePointSize[10], AbsoluteThickness[2]],
              plotOptionsXX["Mean Fixation number", "Fixation Nuber", "SubNo"]] & /@ Range[2]

enter image description here

The Plot On the Left represent each subject average fixation number along with the standard deviation for condition 1. On the right for condition 2.

How could I plot them both on 1 plot ?

If this :

fixNumberF1F6across = {{8.10, 1.99}, {4.48, 2.46}}

was the mean and SD across subject, How could I show both ?

-How can I show 2 conditions on a similar plot for different subjects -How could I show the group mean and SD on it to.

share|improve this question
    
@Yoda, maybe it was the "Need" I forgot. Problem is I would lose the standard deviation if I use BarChart :-( –  500 Sep 21 '11 at 21:34
    
@Yoda. Sorry I don`t understand :-( And if I do have a little idea I would think the bars will overlap ? –  500 Sep 21 '11 at 21:39
    
@500 BoxWhiskerChart(new in v. 8) does almost what you want. However you get quartiles (highlighting the 50% around the mean) rather than z-scores (highlighting 68% around the mean). Somehow, I could not get ErrorListPlot to run on my machine w/ v. 8, even though I did call Needs["ErrorBarPlots'"] –  David Carraher Sep 21 '11 at 21:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Edit:

I started from over. Given how the data are simple and clean, it may be easiest to use ListPlot and add the bars via an Epilog.

You can still tweak it a bit--e.g. put a slight space between the blue and red data points and bars, add a legend, etc, but the basic idea is there.

data = {{{7.11`, 7.51`, 11.14`, 8.19`, 6.58`}, {2.14`, 2.33`, 2.25`,   1.53`, 1.71`}}, {{4.69`, 4.79`, 3.78, 4.34`, 4.8`}, {2.22`,  2.71`, 3.18`, 2.29`, 1.93`}}};

ListPlot[{data[[1, 1]], data[[2, 1]]},
   PlotStyle -> {{PointSize[.025], Red}, {PointSize[0.025], Blue}},
   Frame -> True, 
   PlotRange -> {{0.5, 5.5}, {0, 14}},
   FrameTicks -> {{Automatic, Automatic}, {Range[5], None}},
   FrameLabel -> {{"Fixation (ms)", None}, {"Subject", None}},
   Epilog -> {{Red, Thickness[0.003], Dashed, 
      Line[{{0, m1 = Mean@data[[1, 1]]}, {5.5, m1}}],
      Blue, Line[{{0, m1 = Mean@data[[2, 1]]}, {5.5, m1}}]},
      Thickness[0.005], Red, 
      Line[{{#[[1]], #[[2, 1]]}, {#[[1]], #[[2, 2]]}}] & /@ 
      Transpose@{Range[5], ({#[[1]] + #[[2]], #[[1]] - #[[2]]} & /@ 
      Transpose@data[[1]])},
      Thickness[0.005], Blue, 
      Line[{{#[[1]], #[[2, 1]]}, {#[[1]], #[[2, 2]]}}] & /@ 
      Transpose@{Range[5], ({#[[1]] + #[[2]], #[[1]] - #[[2]]} & /@ 
      Transpose@data[[2]])},
      }]

whisker1

The BoxWhiskerChart below is from your data. If this looks vaguely like something you are interested in, it could be modified so that the spread from the 25th percentile to the 75% percentile is altered to reflect the spread of one s.d. above and below the mean.

And, yes, it is easy to overlay the group means (N=5) onto the Chart.

[The reason there isn't perfect symmetry around the mean is that I used your means and standard deviations to generate raw data, assuming a normal distribution. I only used 100 data points per trial, so a little skewing is natural. This would not happen if we were to tweak the chart to reflect standard deviations, which are symmetrical.]

BoxWhiskerChart

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You David ! –  500 Sep 21 '11 at 22:25
    
@500 I gave your chart another go, using ListPlot. –  David Carraher Sep 22 '11 at 3:20

For any number of series:

plotseries[a_] := 
 Module [{col = ColorData[22, "ColorList"]}, 
  Plot[Evaluate@(Piecewise[{#[[2]], #[[1]] - 1/3 <= x <= #[[1]] + 1/3} & /@ 
           Thread[List[Range@Length@#, #]]] & /@ 
              ({a[[#, 1]] + a[[#, 2]], a[[#, 1]] - a[[#, 2]]}) & /@ 
                (Range@Length@a)), {x, 0, 1 + Length@(a[[1, 1]])}, 
   ClippingStyle -> None,
   PlotStyle -> {None},
   Exclusions -> False,
   Filling -> ({2 # - 1 -> {{2 #}, Directive[col[[#]], Opacity[.2]]}} & /@ 
             Range@Length@a),
   Ticks -> {Range@Length[a[[1, 1]]], Range@#2 &},
   AxesLabel -> {Style["Subject", Medium, Bold], Style["Fixation Time", Medium, Bold]},
   Epilog -> 
    MapIndexed[{Directive[col[[#2[[1]]]], PointSize[.03]], 
       Point@Thread[List[Range@Length[#1[[1]]], #1[[1]]]]} &, a]
   ]
  ]
  b = Table[{Table[j^(i/3) + i, {j, 6}], Table[1, {j, 6}]}, {i, 1, 3}];
  plotseries[b]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Just wondering...why did you treat x as a continuous variable? They are human subjects: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 are simply labels as I understand it. –  David Carraher Sep 22 '11 at 2:10
    
@David It is just for visualization purposes. A shadow is easier to see than the error band superposition proposed by Sjoerd. I am well aware of the conceptual twisting I have done :) –  belisarius Sep 22 '11 at 2:24
    
@David see my new brand way –  belisarius Sep 22 '11 at 7:10
2  
+1 Now that's really nice. I like your use of transparency. Some minor points: remove the non-integer ticks on x, as well as the number 6. And label the axes. –  David Carraher Sep 22 '11 at 11:35
    
@David Your desires are orders –  belisarius Sep 22 '11 at 22:30

I don't work very much with error plots, so this might very well be a non-standard form of displaying the data and hastily put together based on the example in the documentation for ErrorBarFunction.

(*split it up so it's easier to follow*)
meanCond1 = fixNumberF1F6[[1, 1]];
stdCond1 = fixNumberF1F6[[1, 2]];
meanCond2 = fixNumberF1F6[[2, 1]];
stdCond2 = fixNumberF1F6[[2, 2]];

x1 = Transpose@{meanCond1, meanCond2};
x2 = ErrorBar @@@ Transpose@{stdCond1, stdCond2};

Show@(ErrorListPlot[{#1},
     ErrorBarFunction -> 
      Function[{coords, errs}, {Opacity[0.2], EdgeForm[{#2}], 
        Rectangle[coords + {errs[[1, 1]], errs[[2, 1]]}, 
         coords + {errs[[1, 2]], errs[[2, 2]]}]}], PlotStyle -> #2, 
     Axes -> False, Frame -> True, 
     FrameLabel -> {"Condition 1", "Condition 2"}] & @@@ 
   Transpose@{Transpose@{x1, x2}, {Blue, Yellow, Green, Gray, Red}})

enter image description here

Each dot is a different subject. The x coordinate is the mean for condition 1 and the y coordinate is the mean for condition 2. The lengths of the sides of the rectangles are the respective standard deviations. So while it does overlap, if you're prudent in choosing colors (and if there aren't too many subjects), it could perhaps work.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think this is amazing. –  500 Sep 21 '11 at 22:25
1  
An alternative, that might reduce clutter, is to use Disk to create ellipses, plus it's simpler. Disk[coords, Subtract @@@ errs] should do in replacing Rectangle in the ErrorBarFunction. –  rcollyer Sep 22 '11 at 4:27
1  
    
@belisarius, that is amazing. –  rcollyer Sep 22 '11 at 9:48
1  
+1 Very creative, Yoda. –  David Carraher Sep 22 '11 at 11:41
ErrorListPlot[Transpose /@ fixNumberF1F6, 
   PlotRange -> {{0, 6}, {0, 15}}, ImageSize -> 300, 
   FrameTicks -> {{Range[1, 13, 2], None}, {{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, None}}, 
   PlotStyle -> 
       {
        Directive[Opacity[0.6],Black, AbsolutePointSize[10], AbsoluteThickness[2]], 
        Directive[Opacity[0.6],Gray, AbsolutePointSize[10], AbsoluteThickness[2]]
       }, 
   plotOptionsXX["Mean Fixation number", "Fixation Number", "SubNo"]
]

enter image description here

ErrorListPlot[fixNumberF1F6across, PlotRange -> {{0, 3}, {0, 15}}, 
    ImageSize -> 300, 
    FrameTicks -> {{Range[1, 13, 2], None}, {{1, 2}, None}}, 
    PlotStyle -> Directive[Black, AbsolutePointSize[10], AbsoluteThickness[2]], 
    plotOptionsXX["Mean Fixation number", "Fixation Number", "Condition Number"]
]

enter image description here

As to the 3rd. I don't see how you can talk about group means if you want to show the data of the individual subjects. The 4th (5th?) question is totally unclear. I suggest you remove those questions as they don't seem to be specific to Mathematica programming.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You Sjoerd. I removed the last question. I thought it was important to show both to see how subjects are located against the mean for the group. I just thought I could have an horizontal line for that ? If you don`t think it is relevant, I will rely on your judgement, since you are an expert. Many thanks for your attention. –  500 Sep 21 '11 at 22:18
    
@500 There is no reason to eliminate the group means. You are trying to show a difference in two experimental conditions, after all. –  David Carraher Sep 21 '11 at 22:26
    
So here what we are looking at really is : in a free-viwewing 3seconds task how many fixations did subjects do if we consider them all (bond 1 here) or 6cm at least away from the center (condition 2 here) i use that in the intro to show that with a task, and viewing simple abstract pattern, subjects did explore. I am sorry this goes outside pure programming question, however, now i feel math-stat-code-display are so linked in Mathematica. –  500 Sep 21 '11 at 22:37
    
@500 If you're looking into further insight as to how best to represent your data (from a non-programming, but statistical viewpoint), I suggest visiting Cross Validated, which is another site on the SE network. As always, be sure to read their faq and familiarize yourself with what not to ask :) –  r.m. Sep 21 '11 at 22:43
    
@Yoda, thank you, I am lucky to work with staticians, but none using Mathematica :-). –  500 Sep 21 '11 at 23:34

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