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I'm guessing this should be something obvious to those knowing Perl, but I simply don't get it.. I also guess it has to do with problems described in Perl scoping « darkness - but I cannot apply any of that in my case.

Anyways, here's the code:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
# call with:
# ./test.pl

use strict;

my $tvars = "my \$varA = 1;
my \$varB = 2;
my \$varC = 3;
";

my @lines = split /\n/, $tvars;
foreach my $line (@lines) {
  print "$line\n";
  eval $line; warn $@ if $@;
}

#~ print "$varA\n"; # Global symbol "$varA" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 18.
#~ print "$varB\n"; # Global symbol "$varB" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 19.
#~ print "$varC\n"; # Global symbol "$varC" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 20.

$tvars = "our \$varA = 1;
our \$varB = 2;
our \$varC = 3;
";

@lines = split /\n/, $tvars;
foreach my $line (@lines) {
  print "$line\n";
  eval $line; warn $@ if $@;
}

print "$varA\n"; # Global symbol "$varA" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 33.
print "$varB\n"; # Global symbol "$varB" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 34.
print "$varC\n"; # Global symbol "$varC" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 35.

Simply speaking, I'd like to have something like "$varA = 1;" written as a string (text file); and I'd like perl to eval it, so that afterwards I have access to variable "$varA" in the same script - the errors I get when I try to access those after an eval are in the comments of the code above (however, no warnings are reported during the eval). (I'm guessing, what I'd need is something like "global" variables, if the eval runs in a different context than the main script?)

How would I go about doing that? Do I have to go through all of that package definition business, even for a simple script like the above?

Many thanks in advance for any answers,
Cheers!

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1  
in general, eval "$line; 1" or warn $@ is a safer way to call string eval. There is an annoying edge case with eval called in a DESTROY method which will break the warn $@ if $@ pattern since it clears $@ even though the eval failed. –  Eric Strom Sep 21 '11 at 21:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It has everything to do with scoping. The variables are declared with my inside the eval expression. This makes them local to the eval statement and not accessible once the eval statement exits. You can declare them first, though:

my ($varA, $varB, $varC);  # declare outside the eval statement

my $tvars = "\$varA = 1;
\$varB = 2;
\$varC = 3;
";

eval $tvars;
# local $varA, $varB, $varC variables are now initialized

or as you suggest, you can use global variables. The easiest (though not necessarily the "best" way) is to prepend :: to all variable names and get them in the main package.

my $tvars = "\$::varA = 1;
\$::varB = 2;
\$::varC = 3;
";

eval $tvars;
print "A=$::varA, B=$::varB, C=$::varC\n";

Now when you tried our variables in your example, you actually were initializing package (global) variables. But outside the eval statement, you still need to qualify (i.e., specify the package name) them in order to access them:

$tvar = "our \$foo = 5";
eval $tvar;

print $main::foo;    # ==> 5
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Many thanks for that, @mob - those examples help a lot! I'm liking the double colon :: way, not too many changes from the way the problem was originally written... Cheers! –  sdaau Sep 21 '11 at 21:26

The problem is that when you do eval $string, $string is evaluated as its own subroutine which has its own lexical scope. From perldoc -f eval:

In the first form [in which the argument is a string], the return value of EXPR is parsed and 
executed as if it were a little Perl program. The value of the expression (which is itself 
determined within scalar context) is first parsed, and if there were no errors, executed in the 
lexical context of the current Perl program, so that any variable settings or subroutine and format 
definitions remain afterwards.

So, in other words, if you have:

use strict;
use warnings;
eval "my $foo=5;";
print "$foo\n";

you'll get an error:

Global symbol "$foo" requires explicit package name at -e line 3.
Global symbol "$foo" requires explicit package name at -e line 4.

However, if you initialize your variables first, you're fine.

use strict;
use warnings;
my $foo;
eval "\$foo=5;";
print "$foo\n"; #prints out 5, as expected.
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Thanks for the edit, @Jack Maney - good to have that noted; however, the double colon specifier :: does the trick for me in this case to avoid these errors.. Cheers! –  sdaau Sep 21 '11 at 21:43

jjolla, you can use require $filename; or require "filename"; to include a file that has perl syntax. this would declare any variables you need as globals. But as always, be careful with Globals.

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