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I just read a great article about JavaScript Scoping and Hoisting by Ben Cherry in which he gives the following example:

var a = 1;

function b() {
    a = 10;
    return;

    function a() {}
}
b();
alert(a);

Using the code above, the browser will alert "1".

I'm still unsure why it returns "1". Some of the things he says come to mind like: All the function declarations are hoisted to the top. You can scope a variable using function. Still doesn't click for me.

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@BenjaminGruenbaum This question shouldn't have been marked as a duplicate. This question asks about and how function hoisting relates to function-scoped variables, whereas neither the proposed duplicate nor its answers mention anything about variable scope. –  JLRishe Aug 20 '14 at 17:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Function hoisting means that functions are moved to the top of their scope. That is,

function b() {  
   a = 10;  
   return;  
   function a() {} 
} 

will be rewritten by the interpeter to this

function b() {
  function a() {}
  a = 10;
  return;
}

Weird, eh?

Also, in this instance,

function a() {}

behaved the same as

var a = function () {};

So, in essence, this is what the code is doing:

var a = 1;                 //defines "a" in global scope
function b() {  
   var a = function () {}; //defines "a" in local scope 
   a = 10;                 //overwrites local variable "a"
   return;      
}       
b();       
alert(a);                 //alerts global variable "a"
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So all the function declarations are eventually assigned to a variable? –  dev.e.loper Sep 21 '11 at 21:41
4  
@dev.e.loper Yes, in Javascript, functions are first class objects, just like strings and numbers. That means they are defined as variables and can be passed to other functions, be stored in arrays, and so on. –  Peter Olson Sep 21 '11 at 21:44

What you have to remember is that it parses the whole function and resolves all the variables declarations before executing it. So....

function a() {} 

really becomes

var a = function () {}

var a forces it into a local scope, and variable scope is through the entire function, so the global a variable is still 1 because you have declared a into a local scope by making it a function.

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  1. function declaration function a(){} is hoisted first and it behaves like var a = function () {};, hence in local scope a is created.
  2. If you have two variable with same name (one in global another in local), local variable always get precedence over global variable.
  3. When you set a=10, you are setting the local variable a , not the global one.

Hence, the value of global variable remain same and you get, alerted 1

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function a() { } is a function statement, which creates an a variable local to the b function.
Variables are created when a function is parsed, regardless of whether the var or function statement gets executed.

a = 10 sets this local variable.

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actually a = 10 sets a variable in the global scope when the function b is executed unless you add "use strict" (in such environments as support that directive). –  Sean Vieira Sep 21 '11 at 21:35
    
@Sean: No, because the function statement creates a local identifier. –  SLaks Sep 21 '11 at 21:46
    
... and .... you're right. Hadn't realized that particular consequence of function hoisting. Thanks! –  Sean Vieira Sep 21 '11 at 22:24

The function a is hoisted inside function b:

var a = 1; 
function b() { 
   function a() {} 
   a = 10; 
   return;
} 
b(); 
alert(a);

which is almost like using var:

var a = 1; 
function b() { 
   var a = function () {};
   a = 10; 
   return;
} 
b(); 
alert(a);

The function is declared locally, and setting a only happens in the local scope, not the global var.

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It is happening because of the Variable name is same as the function name means "a". Thus due to Javascript hoisting it try to solve the naming conflict and it will return a = 1.

I was also confused about this until i read this post on "JavaScript Hoisting" http://www.ufthelp.com/2014/11/JavaScript-Hoisting.html

Hope it helps.

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Hoisting is a concept made for us to make it easier to understand. What actually happens is the declarations are done first with respect to their scopes and the assignments will happen after that(not at the same time).

When the declarations happen, var a, then function b and inside that b scope, function a is declared.

This function a will shadow the variable a coming from the global scope.

After the declarations are done, the values assign will start, the global a will get the value 1 and the a inside function b will get 10. when you do alert(a), it will call the actual global scope variable. This little change to the code will make it more clear

        var a = 1;

    function b() {
        a = 10;
        return a;

        function a() { }
    }

    alert(b());
    alert(a);
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