Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to handle this issue very badly. I have a resultset in java and i am facing the problem of not closing it. I want to get over this issue by closing the resultset after constructing a HashMap out of it and close the result set after that. I have read on how to iterate through the Hashmap efficiently but i want to know if this HashMap technique is efficient if is there any other efficient way of doing this ?? I need both key and value so the only technique i could think of is hashmap.

If HashMap is what i am looking for finally How do I construct the HashMap and use it to do tasks.

CODE

public HashMap resultSetToHashMap(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException{
  ResultSetMetaData md = rs.getMetaData();
  int columns = md.getColumnCount();
  HashMap row = new HashMap();
  while (rs.next()){
     for(int i=1; i<=columns; i++){
       row.put(md.getColumnName(i),rs.getObject(i));
     }
  }
 return row;
}
share|improve this question
    
Post portion of your code where you are creating hashmap and populating with resultset. –  Usman Saleem Sep 21 '11 at 21:52
    
@Usman: Check my edit.. –  Deepak Sep 21 '11 at 21:58
2  
Misleading method name...I see no ArrayList. –  Zaki Sep 21 '11 at 22:08
    
@Deepak: What you do is generally OK, but you need to rs.close() before you return. Copying the data from result set to HashMap is correct way provided that you need to access the whole data set. –  dma_k Sep 21 '11 at 22:09
3  
Don't close the ResultSet in this method. The ResultSet is passed as a parameter, so it's the caller responsibility to close it. And the close should be done in a 'finally' block so it gets done even if an Exception is thrown. –  Rick Goldstein Sep 21 '11 at 22:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 30 down vote accepted
  1. Iterate over the ResultSet
  2. Create a new Object for each row, to store the fields you need
  3. Add this new object to ArrayList or Hashmap or whatever you fancy
  4. Close the ResultSet, Statement and the DB connection

Done

EDIT: now that you have posted code, I have made a few changes to it.

public List resultSetToArrayList(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException{
  ResultSetMetaData md = rs.getMetaData();
  int columns = md.getColumnCount();
  ArrayList list = new ArrayList(50);
  while (rs.next()){
     HashMap row = new HashMap(columns);
     for(int i=1; i<=columns; ++i){           
      row.put(md.getColumnName(i),rs.getObject(i));
     }
      list.add(row);
  }

 return list;
}
share|improve this answer
    
and why list ?? why cant we use hashmap as it is ? –  Deepak Sep 21 '11 at 22:14
    
@Deepak, becasue a List is a collection of records from the database, where each record (row) is represented as a HashMap, where each hashmap is a mapping from column name and the record data. –  Zaki Sep 21 '11 at 22:15
    
Okay i got it!! If i just use HashMap i will get only one row all the time is it ?? –  Deepak Sep 21 '11 at 22:17
    
@Deepak, yes, pretty much it. –  Zaki Sep 21 '11 at 22:19
1  
I was posting my answer while you guys were hashing this out (no pun intended). In any recent Java compiler, you will get warnings for not using type safe collections. Also, the 'list' and 'row' variables should be declared using the type safe versions of List and Map, not ArrayList and HashMap. You then assign new ArrayList and HashMap instances to those variables. –  Rick Goldstein Sep 21 '11 at 22:27

I just cleaned up RHT's answer to eliminate some warnings and thought I would share. Eclipse did most of the work:

public List<HashMap<String,Object>> convertResultSetToList(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
    ResultSetMetaData md = rs.getMetaData();
    int columns = md.getColumnCount();
    List<HashMap<String,Object>> list = new ArrayList<HashMap<String,Object>>();

    while (rs.next()) {
        HashMap<String,Object> row = new HashMap<String, Object>(columns);
        for(int i=1; i<=columns; ++i) {
            row.put(md.getColumnName(i),rs.getObject(i));
        }
        list.add(row);
    }

    return list;
}
share|improve this answer

RHT pretty much has it. Or you could use a RowSetDynaClass and let someone else do all the work :)

share|improve this answer
    
I am just learning so please bare with me :) –  Deepak Sep 21 '11 at 22:19

A couple of things to enhance the other answers. First, you should never return a HashMap, which is a specific implementation. Return instead a plain old java.util.Map. But that's actually not right for this example, anyway. Your code only returns the last row of the ResultSet as a (Hash)Map. You instead want to return a List<Map<String,Object>>. Think about how you should modify your code to do that. (Or you could take Dave Newton's suggestion).

share|improve this answer
    
yeh i just figured it out!! thanks for the thought though!! –  Deepak Sep 21 '11 at 22:19

this is my alternative solution, instead of a List of Map, i'm using a Map of List. Tested on tables of 5000 elements, on a remote db, times are around 350ms for eiter method.

private Map<String, List<Object>> resultSetToArrayList(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
    ResultSetMetaData md = rs.getMetaData();
    int columns = md.getColumnCount();
    Map<String, List<Object>> map = new HashMap<>(columns);
    for (int i = 1; i <= columns; ++i) {
        map.put(md.getColumnName(i), new ArrayList<>());
    }
    while (rs.next()) {
        for (int i = 1; i <= columns; ++i) {
            map.get(md.getColumnName(i)).add(rs.getObject(i));
        }
    }

    return map;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.