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I have a reasonably big table (>10.000 rows) which is going to grow much bigger fast. On this table I run the following query:

SELECT *, MAX(a) FROM table GROUP BY b, c, d

Currently EXPLAIN tells me that there are no keys, no possible keys and it's "Using temporary; Using filesort". What would the best key be for such a table?

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3 Answers

What about composite key b+c+d+a?

Btw, SELECT * makes no sense in case when you have GROUP BY

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I apologise for my ignorance, but could you unpack your statement "Btw, SELECT * makes no sense in case when you have GROUP BY"? –  Adrien Hingert Sep 22 '11 at 8:11
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@Adrien Hingert: every column in SELECT should be either used in GROUP BY or with aggregation function (COUNT, SUM, etc). Otherwise it is "not possible" to say which values to select. All "mature" databases such as SQL Server, Oracle or Postgres follow this ANSI SQL requirement, but mysql doesn't (it has a special mode to turn it on though) –  zerkms Sep 22 '11 at 8:53
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A primary index on field b,c,d would be nice if applicable.
In that case you just do a

SELECT * FROM table1 
group by <insert PRIMARY KEY here> 

If not put an index on b,c,d.
And maybe on a, depends on the performance.

If b,c,d are always used in unison, use a composite index on all three.

Very important! Always declare a primary key. Without it performance on InnoDB will suck.

To elaborate on @zerkms, you only need to put those columns in the group by clause that completely define the rows that you are selecting.
If you select * that may be OK, but than the max(a) is not needed and neither is the group by.
Also note that the max(a) may come from a different row than the rest of the fields.

The only use case that does make sense is:

select t1.*, count(*) as occurrence from t1 
inner join t2 on (t1.id = t2.manytoone_id) 
group by t1.id

Where t1.id is the PK.

I think you need to rethink that query.
Ask a new question explaining what you want with the real code.
And make sure to ask how to make the outcomedeterminate, so that all values shown are functionally dependent on the group by clause.

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Any reason for b+c+d index to be primary? –  zerkms Sep 21 '11 at 23:19
    
"Very important! Always declare a primary key. Without it performance on InnoDB will suck." --- yes, it is obvious, but why do you insist on grouping by PK?? What is the significant difference between groupping by PK and regular not-null key???? –  zerkms Sep 21 '11 at 23:27
    
"If you select * that may be OK, but than the max(a) is not needed." --- it is not ok. It completely makes no sense with groupping –  zerkms Sep 21 '11 at 23:28
    
@zerkms, that depends, if you have the PK in the group by clause, all fields from that table will be functionally dependent on the group by and select * is not a problem. However in that case the group by is not needed. If you do a select t1.* from t1 inner join t2 on (t1.id = t2.manytoone_id) group by t1.id where id is the PK, then that makes perfect sense. I agree this does not. –  Johan Sep 21 '11 at 23:32
    
lol. If you group by complete PK - then it is pointless, as long as each set will refer to exactly one row. If you group by part of PK - then select * will depend on a set of rows. –  zerkms Sep 21 '11 at 23:36
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the end what worked was a modification to the query as follows:

SELECT b, c, d, e, f, MAX(a) FROM table GROUP BY b, c, d

And creating an index on (b, c, d, e, f).

Thanks a lot for your help: the tips here were very useful.

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