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I inherited a GUI implemented in Delphi RadStudio2007 targeted for Windows XP embedded. I am seeing a lot of code that looks like this:

procedure TStatusForm.Status_refresh;

begin
    if DataModel.CommStatus = COMM_OK then begin
        if CommStatusOKImage.Visible<>True then CommStatusOKImage.Visible:=True;
        if CommStatusErrorImage.Visible<>False then CommStatusErrorImage.Visible:=False;
    end else begin
        if CommStatusOKImage.Visible<>False then CommStatusOKImage.Visible:=False;
        if CommStatusErrorImage.Visible<>True then CommStatusErrorImage.Visible:=True;
    end;
end

I did find this code sample on the Embarcadero site:

procedure TForm1.ShowPaletteButtonClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
    if Form2.Visible = False then Form2.Visible := True;
    Form2.BringToFront;
end; 

That shows a check of Visible before changing it, but there is no explanation of what is served by checking it first.

I am trying to understand why the original developer felt that it was necessary to only set the Visible flag if it was to be changed, and did not choose to code it this way instead:

procedure TStatusForm.Status_refresh;

begin
    CommStatusOKImage.Visible := DataModel.CommStatus = COMM_OK;
    CommStatusErrorImage.Visible := not  CommStatusOKImage.Visible;
end

Are there performance issues or cosmetic issues (such as screen flicker) that I need to be aware of?

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4  
One imagines there might possibly be an advantage of a sort if you're paid by the line of code. –  Larry Lustig Sep 22 '11 at 2:34
    
Visible<>False, seriously? –  Premature Optimization Sep 22 '11 at 11:04
    
@Downvoter -- Yes, seriously :-( Such are the joys of inherited code. Sigh. –  Jay Elston Sep 22 '11 at 18:06
    
@Jay Elston, i'm sure original author was trying to say: Please, please, somebody refactor this! :-) –  Premature Optimization Sep 24 '11 at 9:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

As Remy Lebeau said, Visible setter already checks if new value differs. For example, in XE, for TImage, assignment to Visible actually invokes inherited code:

procedure TControl.SetVisible(Value: Boolean);
begin
  if FVisible <> Value then
  begin
    VisibleChanging;
    FVisible := Value;
    Perform(CM_VISIBLECHANGED, Ord(Value), 0);
    RequestAlign;
  end;
end;

So, there is no benefits of checking it. However, might there in your code are used some third-party or rare components - for them all may be different, though, I doubt it.

You can investigate it yourself, using "Find Declaration" context menu item in editor (or simply Ctrl+click), and/or stepping into VCL code with "Use debug dcus" compiler option turned on.

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Like many properties, the Visible property setter checks if the new value is different than the current value before doing anything. There is no need to check the current property value manually.

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Well, I doubt it will, but maybe there could be issues specifically for forms in recent Delphi versions. The Visible property is redeclared in TCustomForm to assure the execution of the OnCreate event prior to setting the visibility. It is technically not overriden since TControl.SetVisible is not virtual, but it has the same effect:

procedure TCustomForm.SetVisible(Value: Boolean);
begin
  if fsCreating in FFormState then
    if Value then
      Include(FFormState, fsVisible) else
      Exclude(FFormState, fsVisible)
  else
  begin
    if Value and (Visible <> Value) then SetWindowToMonitor;
    inherited Visible := Value;
  end;
end;

This implementation in Delphi 7 still does not require checking the visibility manually, but check this yourself for more recent versions.

Also, I agree with Larry Lustig's comment because the code you provided does not testify of accepted syntax. It could have better been written as:

procedure TForm1.ShowPaletteButtonClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if not Form2.Visible then Form2.Visible := True;
  Form2.BringToFront;
end;
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