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Is there any recommended way with WPF to create a common window style to be used across an application? I have several dialogs that appear in my app, and I would like them all to be styled the same (same window border, ok/cancel button position, etc) and simply have different 'content' in each, depending on the situation. So, one dialog might have a list box in it, one might have a textbox, and so on.

I understand how to make base .cs usercontrol files, but I can't for the life of me work out a good way to create a single window which can host different content when launched?

Cheers, rJ

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One way to do it would be a new custom control, let's call it DialogShell:

namespace Test.Dialogs
{
    public class DialogShell : Window
    {
        static DialogShell()
        {
            DefaultStyleKeyProperty.OverrideMetadata(typeof(DialogShell), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(typeof(DialogShell)));
        }
    }
}

This now needs a template which would normally be defined in Themes/Generic.xaml, there you can create the default structure and bind the Content:

<ResourceDictionary
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:Test.Dialogs">
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type local:DialogShell}" BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type Window}}">
        <Setter Property="Template">
            <Setter.Value>
                <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type local:DialogShell}">
                    <Grid Background="{TemplateBinding Background}">
                        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
                            <RowDefinition />
                            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
                        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
                        <!-- This ContentPresenter automatically binds to the Content of the Window -->
                        <ContentPresenter />
                        <StackPanel Grid.Row="1" Orientation="Horizontal" Margin="5" HorizontalAlignment="Right">
                            <Button Width="100" Content="OK" IsDefault="True" />
                            <Button Width="100" Content="Cancel" IsCancel="True" />
                        </StackPanel>
                    </Grid>
                </ControlTemplate>
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>
</ResourceDictionary>

This is just an example, you probably want to hook up those buttons with custom events and properties you need to define in the cs-file.

This shell then can be used like this:

<diag:DialogShell x:Class="Test.Dialogs.Window1"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:diag="clr-namespace:Test.Dialogs"
        Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
    <Grid>
        <TextBlock Text="Lorem Ipsum" />
    </Grid>
</diag:DialogShell>
namespace Test.Dialogs
{
    public partial class Window1 : DialogShell
    {
        public Window1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }
    }
}

Event wiring example (not sure if this is the "correct" approach though)

<Button Name="PART_OKButton" Width="100" Content="OK" IsDefault="True" />
<Button Name="PART_CancelButton" Width="100" Content="Cancel" IsCancel="True" />
namespace Test.Dialogs
{
    [TemplatePart(Name = "PART_OKButton", Type = typeof(Button))]
    [TemplatePart(Name = "PART_CancelButton", Type = typeof(Button))]
    public class DialogShell : Window
    {
        //...

        public DialogShell()
        {
            Loaded += (_, __) =>
                {
                    var okButton = (Button)Template.FindName("PART_OKButton", this);
                    var cancelButton = (Button)Template.FindName("PART_CancelButton", this);
                    okButton.Click += (s, e) => DialogResult = true;
                    cancelButton.Click += (s, e) => DialogResult = false;
                };
        }
    }
}
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Thanks this seems like it's setting me on the right track. How do I set event handlers to buttons in the DialogShell.XAML ? Since I can't apply an x:class to the ResourceDictionary? –  RJ Lohan Sep 22 '11 at 1:11
    
@RJLohan: You could assign names to the buttons and wire them in the code behind by finding them again in the Template (ctor is too early, Loaded event works). You probably do not even want to expose the events for those buttons if you only have OK & Cancel as those should just set the DialogResult to true or false. (If you do this make those Buttons template-parts, so that someone who creates a theme knows how the buttons should be named) –  H.B. Sep 22 '11 at 1:17
    
@RJLohan: Added example in my answer. –  H.B. Sep 22 '11 at 1:22
    
Thanks for the help so far. I'm not having much luck yet thuogh - my window based on DialogShell is just appearing as an black window - the generic style doesn't seem to be getting picked up. –  RJ Lohan Sep 22 '11 at 2:05
1  
@RJLohan: Most themes do not define a style for Window, i would recommend you drop the BasedOn and use a setter outside of the Template to set the Background to White for example. –  H.B. Sep 22 '11 at 2:52
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To add to H.B.'s very helpful post, you may want to connect your event handlers in the loaded event as he's done but instead of using anonymous methods or lambda expressions, consider connecting them to protected virtual methods which can be overridden in the derived class should the functionality need to vary. In my case, I created a base data entry form which has buttons for saving and cancelling:

    public DataEntryBase()
    {
        Loaded += (_, __) =>
        {
            var saveButton = (Button)Template.FindName("PART_SaveAndCloseButton", this);
            var cancelButton = (Button)Template.FindName("PART_CancelButton", this);
            saveButton.Click += SaveAndClose_Click;
            cancelButton.Click += Cancel_Click;
        };
    }

    protected virtual void SaveAndClose_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { DialogResult = true; }

    protected virtual void Cancel_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { }

The save functionality is then overridden in each derived class to save the specific entity:

    protected override void SaveAndClose_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (Save())
        {
            base.SaveAndClose_Click(sender, e);
        }
    }

    private bool Save()
    {
        Contact item = contactController.SaveAndReturnContact((Contact)DataContext);
        if (item!=null) 
        {
            DataContext = item;
            return true; }
        else 
        {
            MessageBox.Show("The contact was not saved, something bad happened :(");
            return false;
        }            
    }
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Close() is redundant by the way, setting DialogResult closes the window. –  H.B. Aug 19 '13 at 17:25
    
Ya, I found that out sometime later... example modified –  Erikest Aug 20 '13 at 22:24
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You can use define a style in App.Xaml that targets all windows.

This is a sample of how your App.Xaml may look like:

<Application x:Class="ES.UX.App"
         xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
         xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
         StartupUri="Views/MainWindow.xaml">
<Application.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="Window">
        <Setter Property="WindowStyle" Value="ToolWindow" />
    </Style>
</Application.Resources>

Then for more advanced scenarios you may need to set the ControlTemplate for your Window.

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Thanks, but in my case, the 'style' also includes the layout, and so this approach wouldn't really achieve much, as I would still need to re-template the control to provide content in appropriate places. –  RJ Lohan Sep 22 '11 at 1:12
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Creating a cusotm object , which is derived from Window Class..

http://maffelu.net/wpf-window-inheritance-problems-and-problems/

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1  
Can you expand your answer? Links tend to become stale over time. –  orique Oct 28 '13 at 10:52
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