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The javascript below accomplishes the following (this is for a node.js COMET application):

  1. Request is made to the server and held until the server has something to return.
  2. Once the request returns the data is processed and another request is immediately made within the callback function of the success event.
  3. If a timeout occurs (the server had nothing to return within the time frame) another request is made within the callback function of the error event.

My concern (which I believe is valid) is that the requests are continually added to the callstack, much like a recursive function that never ends. After a while, it results in the browser eventually crashing and becoming unresponsive (at least I think this is the cause).

How can I accomplish the same thing and avoid this problem?

function GetData(){
    $.ajax({
        url: "admin.html",
        type: "POST",
        dataType: "json",
        contentType: 'text/json',
        data: JSON.stringify({
            cmd: "getData"
        }),
        timeout: (60 * 1000),
        success: function(data, textStatus, jqXHR){
            UpdateScreen(data);
            GetData();
        },
        error: function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown){
            if(textStatus == "timeout"){
                GetData();
            }
        }
    });
}
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Have you checked out socket.io? May be useful in your situation. –  Marshall Sep 21 '11 at 23:58
    
Shouldn't that be textStatus == "timeout" ? –  jdigital Sep 22 '11 at 0:01
    
@jdigital - right good catch! –  Brandon Boone Sep 22 '11 at 0:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, I'm pretty sure you are OK. The ajax event is asynchronous, so the GetData function will finish and the browser will wait for events, before it calls GetData again from the success handler.

Think of it as the GetData function just defining what to do, not actually doing it. Then it finishes executing (and clears the stack) and browser does those actions.

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Right, forgot that the success and error events are asynchronous. Humm, still I wonder why the browser's crashing... –  Brandon Boone Sep 22 '11 at 0:14
    
This is correct. The asynchronous callback prevents deep stacks because the calling function totally exits before the callback starts. –  Alex Wayne Sep 22 '11 at 0:15
    
@Squeegy: Great! - thanks for the clarification. –  Brandon Boone Sep 22 '11 at 0:17
1  
-1 Not true. In exceptional cases jQuery.ajax can block. i.e. the error handler is called sychronously. –  Raynos Sep 22 '11 at 0:36
function GetData(limit){
    limit = limit || 0;
    $.ajax({
        url: "admin.html",
        type: "POST",
        dataType: "json",
        contentType: 'text/json',
        data: JSON.stringify({
            cmd: "getData"
        }),
        timeout: (60 * 1000),
        success: function(data, textStatus, jqXHR){
            UpdateScreen(data);
            GetData();
        },
        error: function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown){
            if(textStatus === "timeout" && limit < 20){
                GetData(++limit); 
            } else {
                //throw "epic fail"
                setTimeout(GetData, 0);
            }
        }
    });
}

Just add a little timeout limit counter. if it gets too big either give up and throw an error or break the call stack by calling setTimeout which is asynchronous.

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I'm wondering if your UpdateScreen(data) method is the problem. Is that a recursive function as well? People suggesting that you simply timeout the method doesn't actually fix the problem, it simply aborts the process. I would try logging something like console.log("get data success") and console.log("get data error") in your success and error callbacks respectively. If your log page is full of one message, you know where the GetData() method is continually called. It could be always timing out.

On a side note, you should change your if statement for an error to something like

   if(jqxhr.responseText == "timeout"){
      getData();
   }

see here for explanation why: jQuery Ajax error handling, show custom exception messages

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