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I'm currently using Entity Framework for my db access but want to have a look at Dapper. I have classes like this:

public class Course{
   public string Title{get;set;}
   public IList<Location> Locations {get;set;}
   ...
}

public class Location{
   public string Name {get;set;}
   ...
}

So one course can be taught at several locations. Entity Framework does the mapping for me so my Course object is populated with a list of locations. How would I go about this with Dapper, is it even possible or do I have to do it in several query steps?

Thanks.

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Related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/6379155/… – Jeroen K Jul 19 '13 at 14:33
up vote 30 down vote accepted

Dapper is not a full blown ORM it does not handle magic generation of queries and such.

For your particular example the following would probably work:

Grab the courses:

var courses = cnn.Query<Course>("select * from Courses where Category = 1 Order by CreationDate");

Grab the relevant mapping:

var mappings = cnn.Query<CourseLocation>(
   "select * from CourseLocations where CourseId in @Ids", 
    new {Ids = courses.Select(c => c.Id).Distinct()});

Grab the relevant locations

var locations = cnn.Query<Location>(
   "select * from Locations where Id in @Ids",
   new {Ids = mappings.Select(m => m.LocationId).Distinct()}
);

Map it all up

Leaving this to the reader, you create a few maps and iterate through your courses populating with the locations.

Caveat the in trick will work if you have less than 2100 lookups (Sql Server), if you have more you probably want to amend the query to select * from CourseLocations where CourseId in (select Id from Courses ... ) if that is the case you may as well yank all the results in one go using QueryMultiple

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Thanks for the clarification Sam. Like you described above I'm just running a second query fetching the Locations and manually assigning them to the course. I just wanted to make sure I didn't miss something that would allow me to do it with one query. – b3n Sep 23 '11 at 4:43
1  
Sam, in a ~large application where collections are regularly exposed on domain objects as in the example, where would you recommend this code be physically located? (Assuming you would want to consume a similarly fully constructed [Course] entity from numerous different places in your code) In the constructor? In a class factory? Somewhere else? – tbone Aug 27 '15 at 17:27

Alternatively, you can use one query with a lookup:

var lookup = new Dictionary<int, Course>()
conn.Query<Course, Location, Course>(@"
                SELECT c.*, l.*
                FROM Course c
                INNER JOIN Location l ON c.LocationId = l.Id                    
                ", (c, l) => {
                     Course course;
                     if (!lookup.TryGetValue(c.Id, out course)) {
                         lookup.Add(c.Id, course = c);
                     }
                     if (course.Locations == null) 
                         course.Locations = new List<Location>();
                     course.Locations.Add(l); /* Add locations to course */
                     return course;
                 },
                 ).AsQueryable();
var resultList = lookup.Values;

See here http://www.tritac.com/bp-24-dapper-net-by-example

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Very nice. I liked this example, and that's what I'm using. Thank you! – digaomatias Apr 14 '14 at 0:50
2  
This saved me a ton of time. One modification I needed that others may need is to include the splitOn: argument since I wasn't using the default "Id". – Bill Sambrone Jan 7 '15 at 16:52
    
For LEFT JOIN you will get a null item in the location list. Remove them by var items = lookup.Values; items.ForEach(x => x.Locations.RemoveAll(y => y == null)); – Choco Smith Jan 23 '15 at 13:08

Something is missing. If you not specify each field from Locations in the SQL query, the object Location cannot be filled. Take a look:

var lookup = new Dictionary<int, Course>()
conn.Query<Course, Location, Course>(@"
                SELECT c.*, l.Name, l.otherField, l.secondField
                FROM Course c
                INNER JOIN Location l ON c.LocationId = l.Id                    
                ", (c, l) => {
                     Course course;
                     if (!lookup.TryGetValue(c.Id, out course)) {
                         lookup.Add(c.Id, course = c);
                     }
                     if (course.Locations == null) 
                         course.Locations = new List<Location>();
                     course.Locations.Add(a);
                     return course;
                 },
                 ).AsQueryable();
var resultList = lookup.Values;

Using "l.*" on query, I had the list of locations but without data.

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