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here is my code:

//MainWindow.h
#ifndef MAINWINDOW_H
#define MAINWINDOW_H

#include <QtGui>

class MainWindow : public QWidget
{
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    MainWindow(QWidget *parent = 0);
    ~MainWindow();

private:
    QTextEdit *textEdit;
};


#endif // MAINWINDOW_H

// MainWindow.cpp
#include "mainwindow.h"
#include <QMessageBox>

MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget *parent)
{
textEdit = new QTextEdit();
}

MainWindow::~MainWindow()
{
    delete textEdit;
}

//main.cpp
#include <QtGui>
#include "mainwindow.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication a(argc, argv);
    MainWindow w;
    w.show();

    return a.exec();
}

Is it more efficient (here's the "Q[Objects] VS using Pointers?" part of the question) to:

1) Use pointers as I am actually doing or

2) Use objects (removing * + delete statement)

Thank you!

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1  
Are you asking if you should create QObjects on the stack or the heap? –  Stephen Chu Sep 22 '11 at 2:31
    
@Stephen Chu : My question is: should I use pointers for making my QObjects or simply use QObjects as variables. As you can see, I use pointers for each of my QObjects, I'm asking myself if it's more efficient that way or using QObjects as variables. Thank you for your reply! –  Martin Gemme Sep 22 '11 at 2:44

3 Answers 3

MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget *parent)
{
textEdit = new QTextEdit(this);
}

MainWindow::~MainWindow()
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
that's not what I've asked.. I asked what is better between using pointers or not. Thank you anyways. –  Martin Gemme Sep 22 '11 at 1:21
2  
i mean you should use pointers and you should use it like this :) –  user928204 Sep 22 '11 at 1:34
2  
@Martin: If you don't understand what user928204 is trying to say, perhaps you should read up on Qt documentation on QObject class and understand how to use it (and its derived classes) before asking. doc.qt.nokia.com/stable/qobject.html –  ksming Sep 22 '11 at 1:51
    
@ksming Thanks for your auto commenting just like microsoft does when you send them an e-mail. unfortunately, i'm asking an question, I wish an answer, not a computer telling me to go read documentation. I know what is QObjects, I'm new to Qt but still have basics of C++ and other programming languages (C#, java, etc). –  Martin Gemme Sep 22 '11 at 2:07
    
What he's trying to get at is that if you give a QObject a parent QObject, there is no need to delete it yourself as the QObject system will do it for you. –  Chris Sep 22 '11 at 2:43

For QObject members as pointers, you shouldn't use delete, the QTextEdit will probably be a child of MainWindow, so it will be deleted automatically.

It would, of course, be theoretically faster to use non-pointer QObject members, with one less level of indirection. Like this (for those who didn't understand the question):

class MainWindow : public QMainWindow {
   ...
private:
   QTextEdit textEdit;
};

and there is also less code to type, because you don't have to retype the class name of the members to initialize them in the constructor.

But since QObject are themselves already heavily using indirection (with their d-pointer), the gain will probably be negligible. And the extra code you type with pointer members allows you to have a lower coupling between your header files and Qt, because you can use forward declarations instead of header inclusion, which means faster compilations (especially if you are not using precompiled headers yet) and recompilations.

Also,

  • manually deleting QObject pointer members, or
  • declaring QObject as non-pointers members

can causes double deletion, if you don't respectively delete/declare them in the right order (children then parents for deletion, or parents then children for declaration).
For example:

class MainWindow : public QMainWindow {
   ...
private:
   QTextEdit textEdit; 
   QScrollArea scrollArea;
};

MainWindow::MainWindow() {
   setCentralWidget(&scrollArea);
   QWidget *scrolledWidget = new QWidget(&scrollArea);
   QVBoxLayout *lay = new QVBoxLayout(scrolledWidget);
   lay->addWidget(...);
   lay->addWidget(&textEdit); // textEdit becomes a grand-child of scrollArea
   scrollArea.setWidget(scrolledWidget);
}

When MainWindow is deleted, its non-static class members are deleted in the reverse order of their declaration in the class. So scrollArea is destroyed first then textEdit, but scrollArea also destroys its children including textEdit, so textEdit is effectively destroyed twice causing a crash.

So it is less error prone to use QObject members as pointers, and to not delete the QObject which have a parent yourself.

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So you would say that I don't really need the pointer, or the delete on de deconstructor? –  Martin Gemme Oct 20 '11 at 2:46
    
Not exactly, I would rather say that you are no forced to use pointers, but it is easier with pointers, especially if you have a complex QObject hierarchy (typically with QWidgets and QLayouts). And you could delete child QObject manually in the parent destructor, but it is easier not to. And the base QObject destructor will always loop through the list of its child objects to delete them, so you won't even gain anything by deleting them before that loop. –  alexisdm Oct 22 '11 at 10:59

Try creating QLineEdit on the stack and then put it into layout... Quit your application... What do you see? HINT: launch your application in debugger.

ksming is right about reading documentation. It is not language specific issue. If you are asking what is faster: heap or stack allocation then form your question properly.

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