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I am doing a project with a team and some of my team make a hidden display to view the mysql query.Is it safe to do this on live?It's been a month that the site has it.Is it safe to use this kind of technique?

<div style="display: none;">
SELECT *
FROM <statement>
LEFT JOIN <statement>
WHERE `username` = 'admin'
ORDER BY <statement> DESC
</div>
<div style="display: none;">
SELECT *
FROM <statement>
LEFT JOIN <statement>
WHERE <statement>
ORDER BY <statement>
LIMIT 10
</div>
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2  
if the site has a user control system,you could show it only to 'staff' –  Dagon Sep 22 '11 at 3:08
1  
@Dagon that'd be a good compromise that you should post as an answer. Limiting it to a specific set of IPs (that of the office, say) would also be good. –  ceejayoz Sep 22 '11 at 3:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That is simply a horrific idea. You should not let info like that be available.

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I warn them on using this.But the leader of the project just ignore it.I'm just his subordinate.I know some web vulnerability tools like havij and acunetix I know it's not a good idea.I hope someone in my team is reading this thread right now because he used lightsquid to filtered all what I browse.Hope they will listen to you guys. –  gabmon Sep 22 '11 at 3:11
    
I hope they will listen but a word of painful advice. Some times bad programming is good business. Your going to have no choice but to do things wrong sometimes when programming in a business environment.Just keep learning, when you do it for yourself do it correct, grow and move on. –  James Andino Sep 27 '11 at 20:48

This is definitely not a good idea. It gives attackers a substantial amount of information on how your database is structured. If they find an SQL injection hole somewhere, they've got a nice roadmap of exactly what queries to run to completely screw with your database.

This is what development environments are for.

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@ceejaydo you know have better tools in debugging live sites? –  gabmon Sep 22 '11 at 3:12
1  
You could log these queries into a table in the database, I suppose (and turn that behaviour on/off with a configuration setting, so as not to abuse your database 24/7), but again, this is what development environments are for. –  ceejayoz Sep 22 '11 at 3:16
1  
@mocca best practice is to not debug your live site. Debug your dev/staging site and then push approved and tested changes to live. –  Cheekysoft Sep 22 '11 at 13:15

The other posts are dead on, but I'd like to add that if the "technique" of hiding the query that you're referring to is to use css to set the display to "none", then no it's not safe. It assumes that any attacker looking at your site is too dumb to figure out how to view the source.

I guarantee you that if someone is smart enough to know how to perform the sql injection attack in the first place, they know how to open a page in a browser and view the source.

Not to mention that bots that are scanning for vulnerabilities see only the source, setting the display property is pointless.

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I've certainly done it before for brief testing in time-sensitive scenarios where a problem needs to be debugged quickly. But I would avoid if it all possible.

However, I should point out that this should (in theory) not be a security concern. Information about your database schema is really only useful if an attacker has a way to execute SQL commands on your database.

There are certainly other possible risks, but if your security is in good shape otherwise, the risks should be minimal. Just to reiterate though, I'm not advocating this approach as it can still come back to bite you.

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2  
No one ever plans to have an SQL injection hole in their code. If they're doing this on a live site, I wouldn't trust their exploit prevention skills all that much... –  ceejayoz Sep 22 '11 at 3:14
    
That's a fair point :) –  Michael Mior Sep 22 '11 at 3:22

I'm not sure why you'd even want to do this, but if you wanted to check in browser what SQL queries are being done you should probably look at FirePHP (http://www.firephp.org/). It's an extension for the well known firebug firefox extension (extenception...) that lets you view what queries are being done by your code from your browser. You do have to install some server side stuff for that though.

Other than that I don't think it should be THAT much of a problem if you can't actually execute arbitrary SQL queries but I do think that you will be more of a target. If I'd be wearing a black hat and saw that someone printed their SQL queries in the source I'd be much quicker to ponder around than with other sites that don't do this, because they probably do other weird (stupid) stuff.

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