Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
enum itProfs {  
    private int sal;
    DEVELOPER(30), ANALYST(20); 
    itProfs(int sal){
        this.sal = sal;
    }
    public int getSal(){
        return sal;
    }   
}

What is the reason?

share|improve this question
2  
What error do you get ? It probably tells you exactly what the reason and the problem is ;) –  krtek Sep 22 '11 at 3:47
1  
Is there some reason you didn't make "itProfs" a class, and make DEVELOPER and ANALYST an enum??????? –  paulsm4 Sep 22 '11 at 3:53
    
Hi guys!! thank you for your advice. I know the error that the enumeration values first. I want to know the inner implementation in Java why. It is not so intuitive to me. Can you explain this deeper (i.e. memory allocations, internals? Btw this is just a sample code because I'm studying java deeper. –  Brevis Iunius Sep 22 '11 at 5:18
    
ok thanks. readability, that's the word! this feature in Java is just something new to me. @MeBigFatGuy thanks also!! grammar you said. –  Brevis Iunius Sep 23 '11 at 2:33
add comment

2 Answers

You should put enumeration values first.

enum itProfs {  
    DEVELOPER(30), ANALYST(20); 
    private int sal;
    itProfs(int sal){
        this.sal = sal;
    }
    public int getSal(){
        return sal;
    }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi guys!! thank you for your quick answer. I know the error that the enumeration values first. I want to know the inner implementation in Java why. It is not so intuitive to me. Can you explain this deeper (i.e. memory allocations, internals? –  Brevis Iunius Sep 22 '11 at 5:18
2  
just cause. It's how the grammar was defined. They could have done it otherwise, but they didn't –  MeBigFatGuy Sep 22 '11 at 5:38
    
@BrevisIunius, that has nothing to do with memory allocation. It's just a matter of syntax. I think that the main point is readability here. When someone is looking at enum code the first thing he wants to know is available values. And it would be pretty much uncomfortable to search all the class definition for it. –  default locale Sep 22 '11 at 7:20
    
ok thanks. readability, that's the word! this feature in Java is just something new to me. @MeBigFatGuy thanks also!! grammar you said. –  Brevis Iunius Sep 23 '11 at 2:34
add comment

You have to make the constructor private. Also, don't use the default access modifier. It looks ugly.

public enum itProfs {  //Use public
    DEVELOPER(30), ANALYST(20); //Put the enum values first

    private int sal;

    private itProfs(int sal) { //Make this private
        this.sal = sal;
    }
    public int getSal() {
        return sal;
    }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your advice!! do you know why the DEVELOPER..must come before private in sal. Can you explain the internal reason of this? –  Brevis Iunius Sep 22 '11 at 5:22
    
I just haven't done it any other way; I don't know what will happen if you put it after private int sal. :) It's just convention to put your values before the rest of the enum. You need the private constructor, though. –  simplyianm Sep 22 '11 at 5:30
    
thank you @simplyianm!! if it is private, it won't be accessible in other package or in other classes, am I correct? –  Brevis Iunius Sep 23 '11 at 2:31
    
Yes you are. ____ –  simplyianm Sep 23 '11 at 5:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.