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I want to throw some custom exception and write it to the log.
What is the best practice in regards the correct place to write the log from: BLL, or the Exception constructor itself?

class TaskDataValidationFailedException : Exception
{
    public TaskDataValidationFailedException(TaskValidationResult validation)
    {
        this.validation = validation;

        //SHOULD I WRITE THE LOG HERE? 
        _log.Info("Task " + task.Name + " valication failed");
    }
}

or here?

if (!validation.validationSucceeded)
{
     throw new TaskDataValidationFailedException(validation);

     //OR SHOULD I WRITE THE LOG HERE? 
     _log.Info("Task " + task.Name + " valication failed");
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, most people log the Exception just before throwing it. However doing it in the constructor of the Exception has its merits, if you do it right ;D Doing it right means you need one inheritance level more. So you can do it in a centralized constructor (you should have one Exception base class per "component" of your system anyway). The intermediate level Exception will have a ctor that accepts the message and log it. Well, in Java the intermediate Exception would perhaps call a method which could be overwritten in derived classes but this is not possible in C++.

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The second is better:

  • Why should exception know something about log? These two things are independent.
  • You can write to log any number of variables, in the first case you have to pass all of them to your exception.

Also you may consider to write a function for checking validation, writing to log and throwing an exception:

 void CheckValidation(...) {
     if (!validation.validationSucceeded) {
         _log.Info("Task " + task.Name + " valication failed");
         throw new TaskDataValidationFailedException(validation);
      }
 }
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