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I am trying to do something very simple - select the tags which are direct descendants of a tag.

The CSS I am using is as follows:

table.data > tr { background-color: red; }

My HTML looks like this:

<table class="data">
    <tr>
        ...
    </tr>
</table>

But no red background is forthcoming! If I remove the ">" character from the CSS, it works! I have tried this in Firefox, IE 8, Chrome and Safari, and all the browsers do exactly the same thing.

Hopefully someone can help me after so many frustrating hours! I know I am doing something extremely stupid, but I can't figure out what it is.

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possible duplicate of Why doesn't table > tr > td work? –  BoltClock Sep 22 '11 at 7:15
    
maybe you don't need the > since tr is contingent on a table tag and a natural direct descendant of table syntax...? <table><tr><td>text</td></tr></table> –  Chris22 Sep 23 '11 at 20:45
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1 Answer

Most1 browsers automatically insert a tbody element into a table, so the css should be:

table.data > tbody > tr { background-color: red; }

to account for that.


1 I think that all browsers do this, but I don't have the capacity, or time, to check that assumption. If you're concerned that there might be some users with a browser that doesn't do this, you could offer both selectors in the css:

table.data > tr,
table.data > tbody > tr { background-color: red; }
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8  
+1: Must... type... faster.... :) –  Jon Sep 22 '11 at 7:08
    
@Jon Heh. I was thinking the same thing... :p –  Tieson T. Sep 22 '11 at 7:09
    
I was in the middle of a TF2 game when this popped up, so my close vote probably came too late. But your answer is pretty much correct anyway, so have an upvote! –  BoltClock Sep 22 '11 at 7:21
    
@BoltClock: why. thank you kindly! :) Clearly I used the wrong search terms (which given the question is difficult in itself) when I looked for the duplicate(s). Oops... –  David Thomas Sep 22 '11 at 7:22
1  
Browsers add the <tbody> to the DOM, not the HTML source. This is why you see that the HTML source is not modified at all - it really isn't. –  BoltClock Sep 22 '11 at 8:04
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