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This is just a curiosity - I don't have a real question. The output of AbsoluteTiming has a definite pattern; can anyone confirm/explain ?

xxx = RandomReal[NormalDistribution[0, 1], 10^6];

Sin[#] & /@ xxx; // AbsoluteTiming
(* {0.0890089, Null} *)

Max[Exp[#] - 0.5, 0] & /@ xxx; // AbsoluteTiming
(* {0.1560156, Null} *)

$Version
8.0 for Microsoft Windows (64-bit) (February 23, 2011)
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If would be good if you made your question explicit and very clear for the sake of those who will come across it in the future. The same goes for answers as well ... –  Szabolcs Sep 22 '11 at 8:29
3  
That's still a question - can we confirm or explain this behaviour? It's just not a problem :) –  Verbeia Sep 22 '11 at 8:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to the Documentation, "AbsoluteTiming is always accurate down to a granularity of $TimeUnit seconds, but on many systems is much more accurate." So evaluating $TimeUnit probably can elucidate this issue.

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@b.gatessucks What you get by evaluating $TimeUnit on your machine? –  Alexey Popkov Sep 23 '11 at 12:52
    
$TimeUnit is 1/1000 –  b.gatessucks Sep 26 '11 at 11:37

Yep. Let´s check if the time quantum is consistent:

Differences@
 Round[10^5 Sort@
    Union[AbsoluteTiming[
         Sin[#] & /@ 
           RandomReal[NormalDistribution[0, 1], #];][[1]] & /@ 
      RandomInteger[10^6, 100]]]

(*
-> {1562, 1563, 1563, 1562, 1562, 1563, 1563, 1562, 1562, 1563, 1563, \
    1562, 1562, 1563, 1563, 1562, 1562}
*)

Edit

Better code

Differences@
 Sort@Union[
   Round[10^5 AbsoluteTiming[
         Sin[#] & /@ 
           RandomReal[NormalDistribution[0, 1], #];][[1]] & /@ 
     RandomInteger[10^6, 100]]]
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I get {0.0710041, Null} and {0.1250072, Null} plus {100, 0, 300, 400, 300, 200, 300, 200, 100, 0, 200, 0, 500, 100, 100, \ 100, 0, 0, 100, 0, 0, 200, 0, 100, 200, 200, 400, 100, 200, 100, 100, \ 100, 0, 100, 0, 300, 100, 200, 0, 200, 0, 100, 0, 200, 500, 300, 200, \ 0, 400, 0, 0, 600, 200, 200, 100, 200, 201, 200, 300, 100, 100, 100, \ 100, 0, 600, 300, 100, 500, 100, 100, 200, 100, 100, 700, 200, 200, \ 300, 100, 0, 200, 900, 300, 400} –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Sep 22 '11 at 10:08
    
and I get (on windows 7, M V8.01) {100, 100, 200, 100, 100, 400, 100, 100, 0, 100, 100, 100, 100, 400, \ 100, 0, 100, 0, 300, 0, 100, 200, 200, 0, 0, 100, 0, 200, 200, 0, \ 200, 0, 100, 200, 0, 100, 200, 100, 300, 200, 0, 300, 100, 100, 100, \ 100, 0, 100, 0, 0, 600, 100, 300, 500, 0, 300, 200, 200, 200, 200, \ 100, 401, 0, 200, 0, 100, 100, 0, 100, 100, 200, 200, 100, 100, 300, \ 0, 100, 0, 200, 100, 200, 0, 0, 300, 100, 1100, 2400} –  Nasser Sep 22 '11 at 10:23
    
@Sjoerd Just curious ... in my machine the code always returns a clean and sorted list of non-repeating integers ... Can you check where the bug is? –  belisarius Sep 22 '11 at 16:48
    
I get {18, 67, 113, 117, 75, 18, 33, 117, 75, 274, 416, 60, 47, 9, 16, 77, \ 145, 11, 89, 72, 160, 63, 27, 325, 154, 4, 398, 21, 22, 104, 52, 41, \ 64, 24, 160, 27, 158, 94, 123, 46, 29, 182, 55, 2, 62, 0, 175, 75, \ 31, 147, 265, 50, 24, 18, 34, 39, 112, 158, 291, 134, 139, 245, 96, \ 345, 229, 151, 33, 10, 342, 33, 101, 66, 228, 34, 490, 66, 461, 79, \ 8, 169, 485, 91, 71, 35, 78, 89, 274, 192, 4, 85, 185, 211, 367, 170, \ 226, 176, 304, 13, 347} on Linux 64 bit. Seems a Windows only feature. –  b.gatessucks Sep 22 '11 at 18:17

Presumably your system's clock only has granularity to some fraction of a second that happens to produce a repeating decimal. I have never noticed this on my Macs.
It's cool, though.

EDIT
Now that I am home I can confirm this must be system-specific: here is my output from the code in belisarius's answer:

{56, 119, 28, 25, 33, 397, 35, 82, 185, 67, 41, 67, 218, 192, 115, \
28, 74, 16, 187, 222, 194, 8, 129, 399, 68, 75, 71, 34, 5, 37, 62, \
64, 137, 173, 24, 98, 135, 308, 63, 155, 208, 861, 22, 72, 72, 184, \
609, 564, 112, 1011, 118, 81, 158, 90, 351, 33, 35, 68, 10, 126, 39, \
194, 7, 108, 278, 75, 37, 214, 34, 166, 119, 10, 335, 141, 4, 988, \
90, 121, 71, 130, 117, 186, 33, 123, 111, 110, 57, 64, 213, 217, 210, \
204, 98, 247, 20, 1421, 28, 2003, 353}
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