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Here is my problem: there is a class that contains a inner collection (or list, or array, or something like this) of some some class and It must expose a public read-only collection of items, which are properties (or fields) of relative items in inner collection. For example:

//Inner collection consists of items of this class
class SomeClass
{
  public int _age;

  //This property is needed for exposing
  public string Age { get { return this._age.ToString(); } }
}

//Keeps inner collection and expose outer read-only collection
class AnotherClass
{
  private List<SomeClass> _innerList = new List<SomeClass> ();

  public ReadOnlyCollection<string> Ages 
  {
     get 
     {
       //How to implement what i need?
     }
  }
}

I know a simple way to do this by the use of a pair of inner lists, where the second keeps values of needed properties of first. Something like this:

//Inner collection consists of items of this class
class SomeClass
{
  public int _age;

  //This property is needed for exposing
  public string Age { get { return this._age.ToString(); } }
}

//Keeps inner collection and expose outer read-only collection
class AnotherClass
{
  private List<SomeClass> _innerList = new List<SomeClass> ();
  private List<string> _innerAgesList = new List<string> ();

  public ReadOnlyCollection<string> Ages 
  {
     get 
     {
       return this._innerAgesList.AsreadOnly();
     }
  }
}

But I dislike this overhead. May be there is some way to do what I want with exposing interfaces. Help me, please!

Hurra! It seems that the best solution has been found. Due to the post of Groo

this problem found its almost universal answer. Here is It (we need to add two entity):

public interface IIndexable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    T this[int index] { get; }
    int Count { get; }
}

class Indexer <Tsource, Ttarget> : IIndexable<Ttarget>
{
    private IList<Tsource> _source = null;
    private Func<Tsource, Ttarget> _func = null;

    public Indexer(IList<Tsource> list, Func<Tsource, Ttarget> projection)
    {
        this._source = list;
        this._func = projection;
    }

    public Ttarget this[int index] { get { return this._func(this._source[index]); } }

    public int Count { get { return _source.Count; } }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() { return GetEnumerator(); }

    public IEnumerator<Ttarget> GetEnumerator()
    { foreach (Tsource src in this._source) yield return this._func(src); }     
}

With them, our implementation looks like this:

//Inner collection consists of items of this class
class SomeClass
{
  public int _age;

  //This property is needed for exposing
  public string Age { get { return this._age.ToString(); } }
}

//Keeps inner collection and expose outer read-only collection
class AnotherClass
{
  private List<SomeClass> _innerList = new List<SomeClass> ();
  private Indexer<SomeClass, string> _indexer = null;

  public AnotherClass () 
  { this._indexer = new Indexer<SomeClass, string > (this._innerList, s => s.Age); }

  public IIndexable<string> Ages { get { return this._indexer; } }
}

Thank Groo and the rest who answered. Hope, this helps someone else.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The overhead is not so significant if you consider that ReadOnlyCollection is a wrapper around the list (i.e. it doesn't create a copy of all the items).

In other words, if your class looked like this:

class AnotherClass
{
    private ReadOnlyCollection<string> _readonlyList;
    public ReadOnlyCollection<string> ReadonlyList
    {
        get { return _readonlyList; }
    }

    private List<string> _list;
    public List<string> List
    {
        get { return _list; }
    }

    public AnotherClass()
    {
        _list = new List<string>();
        _readonlyList = new ReadOnlyCollection<string>(_list);
    }
}

Then any change to the List property is reflected in the ReadOnlyList property:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        AnotherClass c = new AnotherClass();

        c.List.Add("aaa");
        Console.WriteLine(c.ReadonlyList[0]); // prints "aaa"

        c.List.Add("bbb");
        Console.WriteLine(c.ReadonlyList[1]); // prints "bbb"

        Console.Read();
    }
}

You may have issues with thread safety, but exposing IEnumerable is even worse for that matter.

Personally, I use a custom IIndexable<T> interface with several handy wrapper classes and extension method that I use all over my code for immutable lists. It allows random access to list elements, and does not expose any methods for modification:

public interface IIndexable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    T this[int index] { get; }
    int Length { get; }
}

It also allows neat LINQ-like extension methods like Skip, Take and similar, which have better performance compared to LINQ due to the indexing capability.

In that case, you can implement a projection like this:

public class ProjectionIndexable<Tsrc, Ttarget> : IIndexable<Ttarget>
{
    public ProjectionIndexable
         (IIndexable<Tsrc> src, Func<Tsrc, Ttarget> projection)
    {
        _src = src;
        _projection = projection;
    }

    #region IIndexable<Ttarget> Members

    public Ttarget this[int index]
    {
        get { return _projection(_src[index]); }
    }

    public int Length
    {
        get { return _src.Length; }
    }

    #endregion

    #region IEnumerable<Ttarget> Members

    // create your own enumerator here

    #endregion
}

And use it like this:

class AnotherClass
{
    private IIndexable<string> _readonlyList;
    public IIndexable<string> ReadonlyList
    {
        get { return _readonlyList; }
    }

    private List<SomeClass> _list;
    public List<SomeClass> List
    {
        get { return _list; }
    }

    public AnotherClass()
    {
        _list = new List<SomeClass>();
        _readonlyList = new ProjectionIndexable<SomeClass, string>
             (_list.AsIndexable(), c => c.Age);
    }
}

[Edit]

In the meantime, I posted an article describing such a collection on CodeProject. I saw you've implemented it yourself already, but you can check it out nevertheless and reuse parts of the code where you see fit.

share|improve this answer
    
Thta is a great solution at first blush. I didn't even know that readonly collection can synchronize with List by such a easy way. –  Praetor12 Sep 22 '11 at 8:44
    
@Praetor12: its properties just call the parent list's properties, so you don't need to create a new instance on each access. But the latter solution (IIndexable) is the preferred one since you don't need to keep a projected copy (a list of strings) at all, but rather project each item as needed. –  Groo Sep 22 '11 at 8:52
    
@Praetor12 it's not a synchronization it's the same thing. It's only a different way of accessing the same object –  Rune FS Sep 22 '11 at 8:58
    
IIndexable is useful interface, and its absence in .net is strange. I can't use IEnumerable because I need indexer this[index] and Length for exposing collection. I suppose IIndexable may be used with foreach cycle and some LINQ expressions. Only need to implement IEnumerable(of T). –  Praetor12 Sep 22 '11 at 9:01
    
@Praetor12: There is now an article on CodeProject describing IIndexable. Although you have implemented it yourself already, you can check out some additional extension methods which make its usage a bit simpler. –  Groo Oct 3 '11 at 15:56

Why don't you just return IEnumerable?

If you have access to LINQ (.NET 3.5) then just use a select()

public IEnumerable<string> Ages{
   get{
      return _innerList.Select(s => s.stringProperty);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this might change every time you enumerate it ... and my answer got downvoted because it's not immutable .... ;) –  Carsten König Sep 22 '11 at 9:36
    
Yeh well I guess I didn't really understand the requirement. :) Oh well –  Daryl Teo Sep 22 '11 at 10:17
    
IEnumarable haven't indexer this[index] and property Length. And Select will be executed each time when Ages would be called. In found solution new list is not created by anyone, we simply replace Enumerator ^)) –  Praetor12 Sep 23 '11 at 11:20

in this case I normaly just use IEnumerable - if the collection is readonly and you don't need the Index-functionality you can just do somehting like this:

public IEnumerable<string> Ages
{
   get
   {
      return this._innerList.Select(someObj => someObj.Age).ToArray();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not a read-only collection that's an array of strings (very writable) exposed as an IEnumerable<string>. It does not change the original sequence but to me that simply makes it worse. The write will assume the changes are actually made but instead they are disregarded. Kinda like the problems you get with mutable structs. What would be the reason to call ToArray anyways? –  Rune FS Sep 22 '11 at 8:53
1  
it does not matter how it is exposed (in the end EVERYTHING is mutable inside the computer) - even if you cast it back to an array you cannot change the ages of the SomeObjects inside the object so this exposes them very immutable... –  Carsten König Sep 22 '11 at 9:07
    
@RuneFS: calling ToArray is actually the safest thing to do. Not the best solution performance-wise, but much safer than exposing a mutable list through IEnumerable (like Daryl suggested). And it is immutable as it can get: caller cannot change the source list anyway, and if some really crazy part of code wants to mutate it, it won't affect any other caller (ToArray() ensures that). Also, if the source thread is modified on a separate thread, caller won't get an exception while iterating a copy. My greater concern is that OP actually wanted to expose a collection, not an enumerator. –  Groo Sep 22 '11 at 9:46
    
@Carsten which is exactly my point. So one can go and write code like ((string[])Ages)[0] = "10"; and expect Ages.First() to be "10" this is conceptually close to loosing the change of a temp variable when having mutable structs. Not saying it would be wise to do so but dislike code that makes it possible none the less –  Rune FS Sep 22 '11 at 9:51
    
@Groo Daryl is not exposing a mutable list, he's exposing a projection of a mutable list. The projection is immutable and thread safe as long as the original list is kept thread safe. –  Rune FS Sep 22 '11 at 9:55

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