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I have a simple hash defined somewhere in the main file

our %translations = (
    "phrase 1" => "translation 1",
    # ... and so on 
    );

In another file I want to add some more translations. That is, I want to do something like this:

push our %translations, (
    "phrase N" => "blah-blah",
    # ....
    "phrase M" => "something",
    );

Of course this code wouldn't work: push doesn't work with hashes. So my question is: what is a simple and elegant way to insert a hash of values into an existing hash?

I wouldn't want to resort to

$translations{"phrase N"} = "blah-blah";
# ....
$translations{"phrase M"} = "something";

since in Perl you're supposed to be able to do things without too much repetition in your code...

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can assign to a hash slice using the keys and values functions. As long as the hash isn't modified between the calls, keys will return the keys in the same order that values returns the values.

our %translations = (
  "phrase 1" => "translation 1",
);

{ # Braces just to restrict scope of %add
  my %add = (
    "phrase N" => "blah-blah",
    "phrase M" => "something",
  );
  @translations{keys %add} = values %add;
}

# Or, using your alternate syntax:
@translations{keys %$_} = values %$_ for {
  "phrase N" => "blah-blah",
  "phrase M" => "something",
};
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2  
This helps! I can even write it as @translations{keys %$_} = values $%_ for {"phrase N" => "blah-blah", ...}; –  Pasha S Sep 22 '11 at 10:33
1  
That syntax didn't occur to me, but it is a clever shortcut. The loop makes it probably a hair less efficient, but I doubt the difference is measurable. –  cjm Sep 22 '11 at 10:41
    
well, it's a loop over a single element. More of a convenient way to assign the anonymous hash to the $_ variable. –  Pasha S Sep 22 '11 at 10:49
%translations = (%translations, %new_translations);
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same principle as yi_H's answer, but showing that you can do it on existing hashes, not just while creating %translations –  plusplus Sep 22 '11 at 10:29

You can assign to a hash slice:

@translations{@keys} = @values;

or using data from another hash:

@translations{keys %new} = values %new;
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However since I'm adding many new keys, it will be really hard to keep track of the correspondence between the keys and their values (which translation corresponds to which phrase). –  Pasha S Sep 22 '11 at 9:39
    
@user958624: you can use arrays for keys and values (see the update) –  eugene y Sep 22 '11 at 9:42
%translations = (
    "phrase N" => "blah-blah",
    # ....
    "phrase M" => "something",
    %translations
    );
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Does this copy the entire hash over? That is, suppose %translations contains several thousands entries already. Would you solution create a temp hash ("phrase N"=>..., "phrase M"=>..., <a copy of the original %translations>), and then assign this temp hash to the %translations? If so then there will be a significant overhead for using this method, if not then it seems simple enough! –  Pasha S Sep 22 '11 at 8:58
    
@user958624: yes, it does. A new list value is constructed from these sublists and assigned to %translations –  eugene y Sep 22 '11 at 9:16

Hash::Merge is another option: https://metacpan.org/module/Hash::Merge

also - don't worry too much about optimization in copying hashes - if it becomes a problem, look into it then. Just try and write good clear readable and maintainable code first of all. A hash of several thousand keys with string values is not large!

what you haven't specified in your question, is whether there will be any collision of keys (i.e. could there ever be two 'Phrase 1's read from the files...?

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Hash::Merge is overkill unless you have a nested data structure or need special treatment of duplicate keys. –  cjm Sep 22 '11 at 10:28
1  
i agree, it is in this case, but useful to know the existance of, so thought i'd just mention it. –  plusplus Sep 22 '11 at 10:45

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