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I'm reading How do we capture CTRL ^ C - Perl Monks, but I cannot seem to get the right info to help with my problem.

The thing is - I have an infinite loop, and 'multiline' printout to terminal (I'm aware I'll be told to use ncurses instead - but for short scripts, I'm more comfortable writing a bunch of printfs). I'd like to trap Ctrl-C in such a way, that the script will terminate only after this multiline printout has finished.

The script is (Ubuntu Linux 11.04):

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::HiRes;

binmode(STDIN);   # just in case
binmode(STDOUT);   # just in case


# to properly capture Ctrl-C - so we have all lines printed out
# unfortunately, none of this works:
my $toexit = 0;
$SIG{'INT'} = sub {print "EEEEE";  $toexit=1; };
#~ $SIG{INT} = sub {print "EEEEE";  $toexit=1; };
#~ sub REAPER { # http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=436492
        #~ my $waitedpid = wait;
        #~ # loathe sysV: it makes us not only reinstate
        #~ # the handler, but place it after the wait
        #~ $SIG{CHLD} = \&REAPER;
        #~ print "OOOOO";
    #~ }
#~ $SIG{CHLD} = \&REAPER;
#~ $SIG{'INT'} = 'IGNORE';



# main

# http://stackoverflow.com/questions/14118/how-can-i-test-stdin-without-blocking-in-perl
use IO::Select;
my $fsin = IO::Select->new();
$fsin->add(\*STDIN);


my ($cnt, $string);
$cnt=0;
$string = "";

while (1) {
  $string = ""; # also, re-initialize
  if ($fsin->can_read(0)) { # 0 timeout
    $string = <STDIN>;
  }
  $cnt += length($string);

  printf "cnt: %10d\n", $cnt;
  printf "cntA: %10d\n", $cnt+1;
  printf "cntB: %10d\n", $cnt+2;
  print "\033[3A"; # in bash - go three lines up
  print "\033[1;35m"; # in bash - add some color
  if ($toexit) { die "Exiting\n" ; } ;
}

Now, if I run this, and I press Ctrl-C, I either get something like this (note, the _ indicates position of terminal cursor after script has terminated):

MYPROMPT$ ./test.pl
cnEEEEEcnt:          0
MYPROMPT$ _
cntB:          2
Exiting

or:

MYPROMPT$ ./test.pl
cncnt:          0
MYPROMPT$ _
cntB:          2
Exiting

... however, I'd like to get:

MYPROMPT$ ./test.pl
cncnt:          0
cntA:          1
cntB:          2
Exiting
MYPROMPT$ _

Obviously, handlers are running - but not quite in the timing (or order) I expect them to. Can someone clarify how do I fix this, so I get the output I want?

Many thanks in advance for any answers, Cheers!

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1  
I'm not sure how you can expect to have "Exiting" below the three cnt lines when the only place it occurs in the control flow is right after the codes to bring the cursor back to the top. –  JB. Sep 22 '11 at 9:26
    
Thanks for the comment @JB - just realized that is the problem :) Cheers! –  sdaau Sep 22 '11 at 9:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Hmmm... seems solution was easier than I thought :) Basically, the check for "trapped exit" should run after the lines are printed - but before the characters for "go three lines up" are printed; that is, that section should be:

  printf "cnt: %10d\n", $cnt;
  printf "cntA: %10d\n", $cnt+1;
  printf "cntB: %10d\n", $cnt+2;
  if ($toexit) { die "Exiting\n" ; } ;
  print "\033[3A"; # in bash - go three lines up
  print "\033[1;35m"; # in bash - add some color

... and then the output upon Ctrl-C seems to be like:

MYPROMPT$ ./test.pl 
cnt:          0
^CcntA:          1
cntB:          2
Exiting
MYPROMPT$  _

Well, hope this may help someone,
Cheers!

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