Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have code

internal interface IFoo
{
  void foo();
}

public class A : IFoo
{
  // error CS0737: 'A' does not implement interface member 'IFoo.foo()'. 
  //'A.foo()' cannot implement an interface member because it is not public.
  internal void foo()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("A");
  }
}

Why such strange limitation? I have internal interface and why I can't create internal method in interface realization?

share|improve this question
1  
you cannot have a public class, which is exposed outside, implementing an internal interface which would not be exposed. Does not make sense. –  Davide Piras Sep 22 '11 at 10:29
    
Have you try to implement the interface explicitly : void IFoo.foo() { /* stuff */ } –  meziantou Sep 22 '11 at 10:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is because interfaces can't specify anything about the visibility of members, only the members themselves. All members that implement an interface must be public. The same happens when you implement a private interface.

One solution might be explicitly implementing the interface:

internal interface IFoo
{
  void foo();
}

public class A : IFoo
{
  void IFoo.foo()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("A");
  }
}

In the above code, you must have an instance of A cast to IFoo to be able to call foo(), but you can only do such a cast if you are internal compared to the class and hence have access to IFoo.

share|improve this answer
    
Remove the "public" part from the implementation - it should just be void IFoo.foo() –  Jon Skeet Sep 22 '11 at 10:38
    
@JonSkeet: Oops, good catch, thanks. –  Matthew Scharley Sep 22 '11 at 10:39
    
I known about explicit interface realization. But I don't understand this limitations reason in C#. –  name1ess0ne Sep 22 '11 at 11:24
    
@JonSkeet could probably explain much better than I can, he has a knack for noticing edge cases. I'm not actually sure why myself, I just know how it is. –  Matthew Scharley Sep 22 '11 at 12:06
2  
Basically members of interfaces are always public. This is annoying :( In fact, I've blogged about it before now –  Jon Skeet Sep 22 '11 at 12:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.