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Given:

<Grid>
    <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <ColumnDefinition Width="*" />
        <ColumnDefinition Width="*" />
    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

    <Grid.CommandBindings>
        <CommandBinding Command="Cut" 
                        Executed="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
    </Grid.CommandBindings>

    <TextBox x:Name="WpfTextBox" 
             VerticalAlignment="Center" 
             Text="Hello there" />

    <WindowsFormsHost Grid.Column="1" 
                      VerticalAlignment="Center">
        <wf:TextBox x:Name="WinFormsTextBox" 
                    Text="Hello there" />
    </WindowsFormsHost>
</Grid>

Pressing Cltr+X in WinFormsTextBox casues CommandBinding_Executed to fire, but not when you are in WpfTextBox.

I wish to have the behaviour of WpfTextBox for WinFormsTextBox. I.e. The command should only fire when nothing has focus - it should work like a global view command or something.

Note: Adding a handler to the command's CanExecute event only aids in either preventing anything from happening in the WinFormsTextBox (Ctrl+X is completely swallowed when e.CanExecute is set to true - meaning no text is cut), or performs as normal.

Note 2: Cut is only an example, I would like a solution that would work for any command binding.

Note 3: The command should be able to fire from another control, if it had focus - like a ListView or something. Unless it had a TextBox that had focus inside of it (think edit mode).

I am not sure anything can really be done, I don't want to accept having to add specific handling in the CommandBinding_Executed method. But, C'est la vie.

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2 Answers 2

WPF commands are routed and you defined the CommandBinding for the Ctrl+X command in the parent control of WindowsFormsHost. So if you want it to be handled only in the WPF TextBox remove your CommandBinding from the Grid and put it there:

<TextBox>    
    <TextBox.CommandBindings>
        <CommandBinding Command="Cut" 
                        Executed="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
    </TextBox.CommandBindings>
</TextBox>

As commands are routed, the Ctrl+X command will be handled by the first parent having a binding for this command. As long as your focus is in the scope of the Grid and you execute Ctrl+X command, the Grid command bindings will handle it.


Here is an excellent article about routed events and commands in WPF : Understanding Routed Events and Commands In WPF


EDIT:

If you don't want the command to be handled when in a TextBox then you have to define the CommandBindings only where Ctrl+X makes sense for you. I do not think you have another solution. Anyway, typically the ApplicationCommands like Cut are contextual to a specific scope, for example a RichTextBox or a ListBox.


EDIT:

You cannot block WindowsFormsHost firing underlying routed commands. But what you can do is just to remove the host from the CommandBindings scope:

<Grid>
    <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
       <ColumnDefinition Width="*" />
        <ColumnDefinition Width="*" />
    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

    <Grid Grid.Column="0">
        <Grid.CommandBindings>
            <CommandBinding Command="Cut" 
                            Executed="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
        </Grid.CommandBindings>

        <TextBox x:Name="WpfTextBox" 
                VerticalAlignment="Center" 
                Text="Hello there" />
    </Grid>

    <WindowsFormsHost Grid.Column="1" 
                      VerticalAlignment="Center">
        <wf:TextBox x:Name="WinFormsTextBox" 
                    Text="Hello there" />
    </WindowsFormsHost>
</Grid>

Of course if you have much more objects to layout it can be a bit tricky but it will work. Just remove the objects you do not want to handle commands from the scope of the CommandBindings.

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I don't want to have the command take place on either TextBox. It should happen when outside any TextBox. Sorry, I see that the example is a little misleading, I shall try to edit it. –  Locdarb Sep 22 '11 at 11:25
    
My actual end goal is to have context for the commands defined logically in code, though there will be a sort of adorner UI to display or say what the commands will perform and on what. Sorry for the genericness of that reply, but I hope that helps you see what I'm trying to do! I think I may have to just abandon using CommanBindings or WinForms. –  Locdarb Sep 22 '11 at 11:39
    
Well, as I understand you want to activate a command within a specific UI scope but do not want it be handled on specific control within this scope. If it is what you really want, then it is a bit complicated. What is sure is that CommandBindings are the way to go when you want to globally enable commands in a UI scope. And also this problem is not related to WinForms. I would suggest you to have a closer look to WPF commanding system to understand the problem here and why this behavior is normal. –  Ucodia Sep 22 '11 at 12:04
    
I just want to disable WPF command bindings listening to WinForms stuff, or have WinForms controls not tell WPF about its goings on. That article does not seem to mention this? Though it is very good, wish I had it a few years ago. I can not change the location of the command bindings, they will always be an ancestor of some WinForms controls. –  Locdarb Sep 22 '11 at 14:05
    
I updated my answer. –  Ucodia Sep 22 '11 at 14:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A slightly silly solution for a slightly silly problem. This is a simple version of my final solution:

private void CommandBinding_CanExecute(object sender, CanExecuteRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    e.ContinueRouting = IsFocusInWinFormsInputControl();
}

private static bool IsFocusInWinFormsInputControl()
{
    // Try get focus control
    WinForms.Control focusedWinFormsControl = GetFocusedWinFormsControl();

    // Is there anything and is it a textbox etc?
    return focusedWinFormsControl != null &&
        (focusedWinFormsControl is WinForms.TextBox ||
         focusedWinFormsControl is WinForms.RichTextBox);
}

private static WinForms.Control GetFocusedWinFormsControl()
{
    // Try get focused WinForms control
    IntPtr focusedControlHandle = GetFocus();

    WinForms.Control focusedControl = null;
    if (focusedControlHandle != IntPtr.Zero)
    {
        // Note: If focused Control is not a WinForms control, this will return null
        focusedControl = WinForms.Control.FromHandle(focusedControlHandle);
    }

    return focusedControl;
}

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern IntPtr GetFocus();

Basically, add in command validation logic to only execute the command if we are outside a WinForms TextBox.

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