Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new in c# and i'm still working way through and learning it all.

I have made this code for a progress bar when downloading a file from ftp, and it actually working just fine. But progress value is all wrong. It looks like it is byte value somehow. But the weird thing is when I print the value to the screen, then it prints the correct value.

private void frm_movie_db_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (!File.Exists("movies.list.gz"))
    {
        bg_worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }
}

private void bg_worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    string strDownloadFrom = "ftp://ftp.sunet.se/pub/tv+movies/imdb/movies.list.gz";
    string strDownloadTo = "movies.list.gz";

    try
    {
        FtpWebRequest request = (FtpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(strDownloadFrom);

        request.Method = WebRequestMethods.Ftp.GetFileSize;
        request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential("anonymous", "");
        request.UsePassive = true;
        request.UseBinary = true;
        request.KeepAlive = true;

        Int64 intFileSize = request.GetResponse().ContentLength;
        Int64 intRunningByteTotal = 0;

        request = (FtpWebRequest)FtpWebRequest.Create(strDownloadFrom);
        request.Method = WebRequestMethods.Ftp.DownloadFile;
        request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential("anonymous", "");
        request.UsePassive = true;
        request.UseBinary = true;
        request.KeepAlive = false;

        FtpWebResponse response = (FtpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
        Stream reader = response.GetResponseStream();

        Stream writer = new FileStream(strDownloadTo, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None);
        byte[] byteBuffer = new byte[1024];

        int intByteSize = 0;
        int intProgressPct = 0;

        while ((intByteSize = reader.Read(byteBuffer, 0, byteBuffer.Length)) > 0)
        {
            if (intByteSize == 0)
            {
                intProgressPct = 100;
                bg_worker.ReportProgress(intProgressPct);
            }
            else
            {
                writer.Write(byteBuffer, 0, intByteSize);

                if (intByteSize + intRunningByteTotal <= intFileSize)
                {
                    intRunningByteTotal += intByteSize;
                    double dIndex = intRunningByteTotal;
                    double dTotal = byteBuffer.Length;
                    double dProgressPct = (double)(dIndex / dTotal);
                    intProgressPct = (int)dProgressPct;
                    bg_worker.ReportProgress(intProgressPct);
                }
            }
        }

        //reader.Close();
        //mem_stream.Close();
        //response.Close();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
    }
}

private void bg_worker_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
{
    //pb_download_files.Value = e.ProgressPercentage;
    lbl_progress_pct.Text = e.ProgressPercentage.ToString() + "%";
}

private void bg_worker_RunWorkerComplete(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    pnlProgress.Visible = false;
}

I hope someone can help me with this, as i've done everything so far to fix the problem myself.

Best regards Jesper

share|improve this question
    
There is no value in prefixing your variable names with their type. Read this: stackoverflow.com/questions/111933/… –  jeroenh Sep 22 '11 at 11:11
    
no, lbl_progress_pct.Text = e.ProgressPercentage.ToString() + "%"; does not show the correct value. –  Jesper Jensen Sep 22 '11 at 11:14
    
This double dProgressPct = (double)(dIndex / dTotal); is not calculation of percentage. –  Reniuz Sep 22 '11 at 11:19
1  
Welcome to StackOverflow: as you're new here I remember you should accept an answer if you find that solved (or helped to solve) your problem. –  Marco Sep 22 '11 at 11:20
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're completely mistaken on percentage progress calculation: perc must be 100 x current / total, so you're using wrong values.

Try with this:

double dProgressPct = 100.0 * intRunningByteTotal / intFileSize;
bg_worker.ReportProgress((int)ProgressPct);

Read Microsoft documentation:

public void ReportProgress(int percentProgress)

where percentageProgress is the percentage, from 0 to 100, of the background operation that is complete.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you need to comment whats going on in code, that SO could better understand what he did wrong. +1 anyway –  Reniuz Sep 22 '11 at 11:24
    
This worked for me. My math is allways killing me, maybe I should work on that :p –  Jesper Jensen Sep 22 '11 at 11:28
add comment
double dTotal = byteBuffer.Length;

Does not assign the total bytes to dTotal. byteBuffer is a buffer with a constant size of 1024 bytes. Try something like

double dTotal = reader.Length;

to retrieve the length in bytes of the stream.

share|improve this answer
    
even with this (that is correct) OP should always multiply with 100 to have the correct percentage value –  Marco Sep 22 '11 at 11:25
    
Yes you are right. :-) –  Dennis Nov 16 '11 at 8:10
add comment

you have:

double dTotal = byteBuffer.Length;
double dProgressPct = (double)(dIndex / dTotal);

I think you want:

double dProgressPct = (double)(dIndex / intFileSize );
share|improve this answer
    
even with this (that is correct) OP should always multiply with 100 to have the correct percentage value –  Marco Sep 22 '11 at 11:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.