Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Code talks more:


from pprint import pprint

li = []

for i in range(5):
        li.append(lambda : pprint(i))

for k in li:
        k()

yield:

4
4
4
4
4

why not

0
1
2
3
4

??

Thanks.

P.S. If I write the complete decorator, it works as expected:



from pprint import pprint

li = []

#for i in range(5):
        #li.append(lambda : pprint(i))

def closure(i):
        def _func():
                pprint(i)
        return _func

for i in range(5):
        li.append(closure(i))

for k in li:
        k()
share|improve this question
    
see this question and my answer to this question –  Adrien Plisson Sep 22 '11 at 11:41
    
You can see that is is closing the variable by moving the original loop into a function, and then calling the function before the for k in li: line, so that i isn't a valid name in the module level scope. It will still work (and get the same result because it's closing a reference not the value), meaning that the name is closed. –  agf Sep 22 '11 at 11:45
    
Thank you all. I think stackoverflow.com/questions/2295290/… tells not only the solution but also why. I think my question is duplicate with stackoverflow.com/questions/2295290/… –  Grissiom Sep 22 '11 at 13:15

5 Answers 5

you need to do:

lambda i=i: pprint(i)

instead to capture the current value of i

share|improve this answer

It does properly reference i, only the thing is, that by the time your list gets populated, i would have the value assigned form the last item in the sequence when the iteration ended, so that's why your seeing 4 all over.

share|improve this answer

If you don't want to use a default argument -- which could introduce bugs if accidentally called with an argument -- you can use a nested lambda:

from pprint import pprint

li = []

for i in range(5):
    li.append((lambda x: lambda: pprint(x))(i))

for k in li:
    k()

This is an anonymous version of your closure function.

share|improve this answer

The lambda functions create closures over the i variable. After the first for loop is finished, i has value 4.

Then the second for loop starts and all the lambda functions are executed. Each of them then prints the current value of i, which is 4.

share|improve this answer

The answer: Because the code inside the lambda is using your global variable i.

Your second variant will do the same as the first one with lambda if you remove the parameter i:

def closure():

Instead of

def closure(i):

I.e. the code inside the function will use the global variable i.

share|improve this answer
    
It has nothing to do with the scope of the variable, it's the fact that what is closed is a reference to a value rather than a value. See my comment to the question -- if you move the for i in range loop into a function, so i doesn't exist in global scope, then call the function before the for k in li loop, it will give the same answer. –  agf Sep 22 '11 at 12:28
    
>if you move the for i in range loop into a function, so i doesn't exist in global scope, then call the function before the for k in li loop, it will give the same answer... --- i.e. non local? That's what i meant. –  warvariuc Sep 22 '11 at 18:02
    
it is looking for variable i. as there is no function argument i it takes variable i from outer scope. –  warvariuc Sep 22 '11 at 18:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.