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i have a mysql query like:

select * from employee 
  where name like '%ani%'

I want my results to be order by starting with ani for eg. my results should be comming as: {anil,anirudha,rani, ...} starting with ani first and then followed by other characters.

Can anybody please help me on this.

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Something like

select * from employee where name like '%ani%' order by locate('ani', name) asc, name asc

Should do the trick ... (sort by position of the substring in the whole string)

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it will work for string starting with ani .. but if string starts with info then it wont work – jijo pidiyath Sep 22 '11 at 13:02
    
Well, the location will return 0, 1, 2 ... for strings starting with 'ani', '.ani', '..ani' ... I see a pattern there ... 'infoani' should return 4 ? – Ezekiel Rage Sep 22 '11 at 19:49
    
Aha, replace 'ani' with the strign of your choice, e.g. 'info', 'whatever', etc ... – Ezekiel Rage Sep 27 '11 at 12:24
    
@EzekielRage i like you solution. although seems that mysql like function and locate function are not working the same on some characters. for example searching ā with like will be found(using utf8_general_ci or utf_unicode_ci) but it wont be find by locate. see my post stackoverflow.com/q/21695687/1211174 EDIT 3 is relevent for that. any ideas how to overcome this issue? – oak Feb 11 '14 at 9:38

Edit: Added the second solution.

Solution 1:

select  1 AS OrderField, name
from    employee 
where   name like 'ani%'
UNION ALL
select  2 AS OrderField, name
from    employee 
where   name like '_%ani%'
ORDER BY OrderField, name

Solution 2:

select  name, CASE WHEN name LIKE 'ani%' THEN 1 ELSE 2 END OrderField
from    employee
where   name like '%ani%'
order by OrderField, name
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1  
nice!!! correct the second where clausule as where name like '_%ani%' – Luis Siquot Sep 22 '11 at 13:55
    
Thanks. UNION ALL is better than UNION because UNION must eliminates duplicate rows and this means sorting which is costly. – Bogdan Sahlean Sep 22 '11 at 17:46

You can possibly use a union to achieve this:

select * from employee where name like 'ani%' order by name
union 
select * from employee where name like '%ani%' and not name like 'ani%' order by name
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What if the searched string is zanzibar and you have three strings containing this word: zanzibar, zanzibar tanzania and alamo zanzibar ? Your query will have this results: alamo zanzibar, zanzibar and zanzibar tanzania which is wrong. – Bogdan Sahlean Sep 22 '11 at 13:11

I am not entirely sure exactly what you are looking for. If you would like to just order the results of that query by name:

select * from employee 
  where name like '%ani%'
order by name asc;
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i am lokking for sorting my results base on query string for eg for a query like select * from employee where name like '%info%' .... results should be sorted as infosys,infobridge,shell info ... – jijo pidiyath Sep 22 '11 at 13:03
    
The results of this query will be sorted by employee name and will exclude employees that do not contain %ani%. I am slightly confused by the ordering in your comment. Does the name need to be sorted by ascending or descending? I was thinking infobridge would come before infosys – John Kane Sep 22 '11 at 13:10
select  * from employee 
where name like '%'+'ani'+'%'
order by if(SUBSTRING(name, 1, length('ani'))= 'ani', 0,1), name

for mssql server repalce if with case when
with the syntax provided, is easy to replace 'ani' with any value you want

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