Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for a way to write something like this:

if (product.Category.PCATID != 10 && product.Category.PCATID != 11 && product.Category.PCATID != 16) {   }

In a shorthand way like below, which does not work of course:

if (product.Category.PCATID != 10 | 11 | 16) {   }

So is there shorthand way at all to do something similar ?

share|improve this question
    
It's been answered in this question as well: stackoverflow.com/questions/9033/hidden-features-of-c/… –  Patrick Sep 22 '11 at 13:05
    
@LaserBeak: Your latest edit changes your question COMPLETELY! This doesn't even compile. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 22 '11 at 13:16
    
@LaserBeak: It is very bad practice to change your question substantially after answers have been posted. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 22 '11 at 16:25
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use an extension method:

    public static bool In<T>(this T source, params T[] list)
    {
        return list.Contains(source);
    }

And call it like:

  if (!product.Category.PCATID.In(10, 11, 16)) {  }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes - you should use a set:

private static readonly HashSet<int> FooCategoryIds
    = new HashSet<int> { 10, 11, 16 };

...

if (!FooCategoryIds.Contains(product.Category.PCATID))
{
}

You can use a list or an array or basically any collection, of course - and for small sets of IDs it won't matter which you use... but I would personally use a HashSet to show that I really am only interested in the "set-ness", not the ordering.

share|improve this answer
    
For more info and uses of the HashSet, look here. johnnycoder.com/blog/2009/12/22/c-hashsett –  Jeff Reddy Sep 22 '11 at 12:53
add comment

not exactly a shortcut, but maybe the right thing for you.

var list = new List<int> { 10, 11, 16 };
if(!list.Contains(product.Category.PCATID))
{
  // do something
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Well... I think a shorthand version would be if(true), because if PCATID == 10, it is != 11 and != 16, so the whole expression is true.
The same goes for PCATID == 11 and for PCATID == 16.
And for any other number all three conditions are true.
==> You expression will always be true.

The other answers are only valid, if you really meant this:

if (product.Category.PCATID != 10 && 
    product.Category.PCATID != 11 && 
    product.Category.PCATID != 16) {   }
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could do something like that:

List<int> PCATIDCorrectValues = new List<int> {10, 11, 16};

if (!PCATIDCorrectValues.Contains(product.Category.PCATID)) {
    // Blah blah
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
if (!new int[] { 10, 11, 16 }.Contains(product.Category.PCATID))
{
}

Add using System.Linq to the top of your class or .Contains generates a compile error.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.