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During a typical day programming, I implement functions in a way that I would like to remember. For instance, say I tuned a DB insert function that, when I come across the situation again, I want to find what I did to resuse. I need a place to keep the solution(what I did), and I need to find it somehow, which may be months or a year later. Using a mind map sort of idea, I was thinking about a personal wiki, but then I heard the stackoverflow podcast mention using this site for such a reason. Does anybody else keep track of slick things they've done so that they may find it sometime in the future. If so, what did you use, and in general, how do you use it?


i like to personal blog idea and using the stack for it. i'll try the idea of posting at the stack and then answering it myself, with the benefit of other people potentially giving their opinion. As long a the stack will be around for a while :)

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13 Answers 13

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Jeff Atwood recommends using Stack Overflow for this kind of thing. Post a question (your problem) and then post an answer (the solution you found). This lets you share the information with the world, and maybe get some valuable feedback or better solutions.

(Wow, I got downvoted for repeating what Jeff Atwood said. I won't do that again, I promise.)

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I use neomem all the time. I write notes to myself. Then I can later search for it.

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I use a personal Wiki, my del.icio.us bookmarks and my own blog for that. Usually my blog: When I learn something that I know I might stumble on again I write a short post in my blog.

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The technical term for what you are thinking of is "code snippets", and googling for that will find you many programs designed to store them for a variety of platforms, including entirely web-based ones such as this one.

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I set up dekiwiki on a server at work that my coworkers and I use for company specifics stuff but also for general programming tips that arise as well.

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A simple wiki, may be useful. SeeTiki Wiki

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I always put it on my blog. Not only am I able to get back to it later, there is also a chance that it can help someone else as well.

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I use WikiDPad or Wiki-On-A-Stick. It works not only for code snippets but also to take notes, record typical problems you get and how to solve them and documentation. Take my word for it, it makes your job a LOT more easier if you have proper notes... and add the power of interlinking to it and you have a killer resource. I have very bad memory and taking notes has improved my performance by an order of magnitude. It also saves you from having to ask someone the same question twice or thrice. Also, if anyone asks the same question, you can just helpfully point them to the wiki and they can read it and add to it if they need to.

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It's oldschool, but I keep notes in a notebook. Makes remembering solutions (or the problems that caused them) a bit easier. Usually I make 1-2 pages of notes a day.

The digital equivalent of this would be keeping a private blog or journal. Easy enough to add a search program to help you find stuff.

Worthwhile things that my boss might be interested in, like bugs and user calls all get entered into bug tracking software where it is more formally handled.

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I use the excellent Trac project management system for my personal projects, and I use it's wiki as a brainstorming and note-taking tool. And, because it also hooks into the Subversion repository and the bug tracking system, I can link from my notes right to a particular section of code or a bug report.

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I keep my personal projects on assembla. Wiki, Issue Tracking, Source Control... very useful.

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Check to see if your editor has some kind of annotations feature. Ideally you could link a particular location in code with a small note, and store it in a centralized place. If it doesn't, that kind of plugin wouldn't be too hard to build, your biggest hurdle is going to be how to link the piece of code to a file (due to the volatile nature of code) and even that one isn't insurmountable.

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