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I am quite sure I know the answer, just want to make sure I got this right.
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If I use the CloudBlobClient from a WCF service that sits in my WebRole, to access blobs (read/write/update) , so :

1) Does read/write/update charge as transaction or are they free ?

2) Does the speed of accessing those blobs is fast as mentioned in the note ?

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If I use the CloudBlobClient from a WCF service that sits in my WebRole, to access blobs (read/write/update) , so : 1) Does read/write/update charge as transaction or are they free ?

Transaction metering is independent of where the requests are made from. Storage read/write/update is done via REST API calls (or through an SDK call that wraps the REST API calls). Each successful REST API call will effectively count as a transaction. Specific details of what constitutes a transaction (as well as what's NOT counted as a transaction) may be found here.

By accessing blob storage from your Worker / Web role, you'll avoid Internet-based speed issues, and you won't pay for any data egress. (Note: Data ingress to the data center is free).

2) Does the speed of accessing those blobs is fast as mentioned in the note ?

Speed between your role instance and storage is governed by two things:

  1. Network bandwidth. Your LAN card will offer you approx. 100Mbps of bandwidth per core. The exception is the Extra Small VM size, where you'll see approx. 5Mbps.
  2. Transaction rate. On a given storage account, there are very specific documented performance targets. This MSDN blog post breaks down the numbers in detail for a storage account itself, as well as targets for blobs, tables and queues.
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About my second question, considering what you said, especially about the Network bandwidth, how is it possible to "..copy gigabytes of data... in seconds" ? When I first saw that statement I immediately concluded that transfer speeds between blob and roles is neglectable when considering scalability. ( I am asking this before delving into the blog post you mentioned. –  Yaron Levi Nov 27 '11 at 9:34
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If you read the article, you'll see specific performance targets. For instance, with a single blob, you can expect up to 60 MBytes per second, which is approaching the capacity of the NIC on an Extra Large instance. That gives you about a gigabyte in maybe 16-20 seconds. If you have multiple instances, you can move even more data, as a single storage account has a performance target of 3 gigabits per second. –  David Makogon Nov 27 '11 at 13:22

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