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When scripting a SQL Server 2000 database, on an SQL Server 2000 version of SQL Server, with SQL Server Management Studio 2008 R2 (10.50.1617.0) i get the error:

Creating a user without an associated login is not supported in SQL Server 2008 R2.

With the full stack trace:

Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.SmoException: Creating a user without an associated login is not supported in SQL Server 2008 R2.;   
at Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.SqlScriptPublish.GeneratePublishPage.worker_DoWork(Object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) at System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker.OnDoWork(DoWorkEventArgs e)  
at System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker.WorkerThreadStart(Object argument)

What is a good way to resolve this issue.

i've considered:

  • creating a login (and incur the wrath high atop the thing)
  • deleting the user (and incur the wrath from high atop the place)
  • select some rather than all objects to script, and don't script the user that offends SQL Server 2008 R2

But i'll let people on SO post answers, get answers upvoted, and accept an answer that best solves the problem.

share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't part of your script include server-level objects that are required to support your database? This includes linked servers, logins, jobs, entries in sys.messages... – Aaron Bertrand Sep 22 '11 at 13:37
    
i think the confusion here, and in gbn's answer, is that there is no login associated with the user. The error is correct. i could create a login, and run sp_change_users_login. Or i could not do that, causing doing that will tempt the wrath from high atop the thing. – Ian Boyd Sep 22 '11 at 14:22
    
I have no idea what you're getting at with "tempt the wrath from high atop" - you've said that three times but I don't understand the problem. If you want to not create incompatible users in SQL Server 2008 R2, then you're going to have to not create them. – Aaron Bertrand Sep 22 '11 at 14:29
1  
@Aaron Bertrand: Create an answer that says something to the effect, "When you script the database, rather than scripting all objects, script all objects except the the username that is causing the failure." Add a sample screenshot with that, and you have yourself an accepted answer. i created the question on SO because there is no mention of the error Creating a user without an associated login is not supported in SQL Server 2008 R2 anywhere on the internet. Stack Overflow is a place where someone googling for the problem will find a workaround - and i'm letting you create that answer. – Ian Boyd Sep 22 '11 at 14:36
    
As for the tempting the wrath from high atop the thing: there is a user in the database with no associated login on the server. My psychic debugging skills tells me that the database was either restored or attached to a new server, but no login was ever created to match all users in the database. i could create a login on the server - but that's a security issue. And something like that will require government auditors to be consulted, along with e-mails and meetings. When the alternative is just "don't scrip that user" then that's a much better solution. – Ian Boyd Sep 22 '11 at 14:38

I suspect that your SQL Server 2000 database has user aliases: these were required in SQL Server 6.5 in some circumstances because it was, er, crap,

Note what MSDN says:

sp_addalias is provided for backward compatibility. Microsoft® SQL Server™ version 7.0 provides roles and the ability to grant permissions to roles as an alternative to using aliases.

Run sp_helpuser on the SQL Server 2000 box and review the output and remove them

share|improve this answer

As instructed. Just don't script the database users that have no associated login. You can do this in the Tasks > Generate Scripts wizard (pointing 2008 or later SSMS at your 2000 instance) by choosing to select specific database objects and unchecking any troublesome users:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Tee hee as instructed. Of course maybe there is a better solution; a checkbox somewhere in SSMS that says, "Allowing scripting of users and user permissions that have no associated login." i don't think so - but let the most upvoted answer win. – Ian Boyd Sep 22 '11 at 14:45

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