Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Without automatic reference counting you often write code like this, when adding a new class:

assuming the classname is "Foo"

+ (id) foo
{
    return [[[self alloc] init] autorelease];
}

- (id) init
{
    self = [super init];
    // do some initialization here
    return self;
}

Well, how are you supposed, to write this for arc? Just like the code below?

+ (id) foo
{
    return [[self alloc] init];
}

- (id) init
{
    self = [super init];
    // do some initialization here
    return self;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Note that you should really use self instead of Foo in the convenience constructor so that subclasses work properly. See, e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/5987969/… –  Josh Caswell Sep 22 '11 at 18:42
    
Yes, you are right, I am doing that in real code, just totally forgot it in the sample code. Will fix. –  Kaiserludi Sep 23 '11 at 12:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes. Are you expecting something different?

share|improve this answer
    
Well, was just wondering, as I have not found any special info about convenience constructors in arc. Interesting, that it now makes practically no difference, which of the two variants is used. –  Kaiserludi Sep 23 '11 at 12:36
    
I expect with ARC that +new will be resurrected after being ignored for so long. –  Rob Napier Sep 23 '11 at 13:18
    
Isn't it incredibly significant whether or not you have the word "init" at the beginning of your constructors? –  Benjamin Wheeler Jun 20 '13 at 20:20
    
Not for memory management. The magic word you're thinking of is +alloc (see robnapier.net/blog/three-magic-words-6 for more on that). -init… does create some magic for how a returned id is treated (it is assumed by the compiler to be the class passed to +alloc). The addition of instancetype addresses that for non-init constructors. nshipster.com/instancetype –  Rob Napier Jun 20 '13 at 22:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.