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Is it possible to receive the output of time.time() in Python 2.5 as a Decimal?

If not (and it has to be a float), then is it possible to guarantee that inaccuracy will always be more than (rather than less than) the original value. In other words:

>>> repr(0.1)
'0.10000000000000001' # More than 0.1 which is what I want

>>> repr(0.99)
'0.98999999999999999' # Less than 0.99 which is unacceptable

Code example:

import math, time

sleep_time = 0.1

while True:
  time_before = time.time()
  time.sleep(sleep_time)
  time_after = time.time()
  time_taken = time_after - time_before
  assert time_taken >= sleep_time, '%r < %r' % (time_taken, sleep_time)

EDIT:

Now using the following (which does not fail in testing but could still theoretically fail):

import time
from decimal import Decimal

def to_dec(float_num):
  return Decimal('%2f' % float_num)

sleep_time = to_dec(0.1)

while True:
  time_before = to_dec(time.time())
  time.sleep(float(sleep_time))
  time_after = to_dec(time.time())
  time_taken = time_after - time_before
  assert time_taken >= sleep_time, '%r < %r' % (time_taken, sleep_time)
  print 'time_taken (%s) >= sleep_time (%s)' % (time_taken, sleep_time)
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2  
To help us give sensible answers, could you explain the real purpose behind this requirement? –  NPE Sep 22 '11 at 15:32
    
It is for a timing function which needs to register a time before and after a call that may sleep. So assert time after - time before >= sleep time, which is not always the case with floats. Remembering that time.time() gives you a float. –  Metalshark Sep 22 '11 at 15:38
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could simply multiple time.time() by some value to get the precision you want (note that many calls can't guarantee sub-second accuracy anyways). So,

startTime = int(time.time() * 100)
#...
endTime = int(time.time() * 100)

Will satisfy your condition that endTime - startTime >= sleepTime

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It is for a timing function which needs to register a time before and after a call that may sleep. So time after - time before >= sleep time, which is not always the case with floats.

I think your requirements are inconsistent. You seem to want to call the same function twice, and have the first call round the result downwards, and the second call to round the result upwards.

If I were you:

  1. I'd time many calls instead of just one.
  2. When drawing any conclusions I'd take into account the resolution of the timer and any floating-point issues (if relevant).
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Its true that the requirements can be construed as inconsistent. However from testing if just before_time rounds upwards the assertion never fails; i.e. -before -after, +before +after, +before -after all pass and -before +after fails. –  Metalshark Sep 23 '11 at 18:25
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You could format your float value as so:

>>> '%.2f' % 0.99
'0.99'

See Python's String Formatting Operations

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This works well for output, but if you need to store the values, then compare, you'll want to make sure to store them as int to avoid imprecision –  brc Sep 22 '11 at 16:09
    
This question has more to do with representation error than imprecision. See: docs.python.org/tutorial/… –  Alex Smith Sep 22 '11 at 16:28
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