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Hey is this the correct way to do concatenation? it does not seem to want to work for me!.

        $driver1points = 0;
        $driver2points = 0;
        $driver3points = 0;
        $driver4points = 0;

        for($i = 1; $i <= 4; $++){
            if(${"driver".$i} == $driverrace["fastestlap"]) {
                ${"driver". $i ."points"} += $driver_points_system["fastestlap"];
                $racepoints += $team_points_system["fastestlap"];
                break;
            }
         }
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there are a lot of errors in this code. You forgot the ) after the conditional (if) statement and you need a == instead of an =. –  Cory Danielson Sep 22 '11 at 16:01
    
Sorry about that, its just instead of doing the if(driver1 = $driverrace["fastestlap"]) for each driver1, driver2, driver3, drive4, that a loop like this and a break, will save cpu cycles as it will escape the loop once the match is found. Is there another better way to do this??. –  Lee Sep 22 '11 at 16:03
1  
you should definitely use a driverPoints array to store the point values and a driver array to store the drivers. –  Cory Danielson Sep 22 '11 at 16:07
    
You can write: if ("driver$1" == $driverrace['fastestlap']) and if ("driver{$1}" == $driverrace['fastestlap']) As far as the concatenation goes.. :) –  EO2 Sep 22 '11 at 16:14
3  
seriously, you need to use arrays -- concatenating variable names like that is an abomination. –  Spudley Sep 22 '11 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I agree with what is said in the comments. An array is a much better way to handle this.

<?php
$driver1points = 0;
$driver2points = 0;
$driver3points = 0;
$driver4points = 0;

for($i = 1; $i <= 4; $++) {
    $driver = "driver$i";
    if($$driver == $driverrace["fastestlap"]) {
        ${$driver."points"} += $driver_points_system["fastestlap"];
        $racepoints += $team_points_system["fastestlap"];
        break;
    }
}

Can be translated into:

<?php
$drivers['bill']   = 0;
$drivers['ted']    = 0;
$drivers['cheech'] = 0;
$drivers['chong']  = 0;

foreach ( $drivers as $driver => &$points ) {
    if ( $driver == $race['fastestlap'] ) {
        echo "$driver had the fastest lap!";
        $points     += $driver_points_system['fastestlap'];
        $racepoints += $team_points_system['fastestlap'];
        break;
    }
}

You can obviously do this as a numerative array and replace all of the $drivers[$driverName] assignments to just $drivers[]. I used an associative array to demonstrate that arrays are not only more efficient for this application, they can also be much easier to work with.

I passed the value argument of the foreach by reference, the "&" prefix (similar to a pointer, variable stores the memory address as opposed to the value); this allows you to directly manipulate the value in your logic as opposed to being given a copy of the value and needing to reassign with something similar to a $drivers[$driver] = $points;

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thanks a lot! I suppose its time I got my head around pointers. –  Lee Sep 22 '11 at 16:39
    
They're really simple in PHP. You use the & in variable assignment and you assign a reference to that variable opposed to copying the contents of the variable. You handle the variable exactly as you would normally. For example $a = 1; $b = $a; $b = 5; echo $a; would give you 1 still because you simply copied the data into a new variable. If you assign a reference such as $a = 1; $b = &$a; $b = 5; echo $a; your output would now be 5 because instead of assigning the value of $a to new variable $b, you created $b as a reference to $a. Great when working with arrays, superglobals, etc. –  Steve Buzonas Sep 22 '11 at 17:13
    
There are other aspects of assigning by reference that would be used more often than a simple variable assignment by reference. Functions accepting arguments by reference to directly change the variable opposed to assigning a return result. Functions passing objects by reference. Those are two that I use more often. I hope the previous comment gave you insight as to how references work and this comment let you know more about how they are used. –  Steve Buzonas Sep 22 '11 at 17:16
    
hey on the if statement on your code above, the $driver variable is actually comparing a separate variable not the drivers points, basically the user has $driver1 $driver2 $driver3 $driver4 and there values are the drivers ID in the database, can you pass two variables in the for each statement? and if not can it still be done with the for each? –  Lee Sep 22 '11 at 19:45
    
and yes they did! thanks a lot for your time! I will do some reading on them. –  Lee Sep 22 '11 at 19:45

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