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How can one detect being in a chroot jail without root privileges? Assume a standard BSD or Linux system. The best I came up with was to look at the inode value for "/" and to consider whether it is reasonably low, but I would like a more accurate method for detection.

[edit 20080916 142430 EST] Simply looking around the filesystem isn't sufficient, as it's not difficult to duplicate things like /boot and /dev to fool the jailed user.

[edit 20080916 142950 EST] For Linux systems, checking for unexpected values within /proc is reasonable, but what about systems that don't support /proc in the first place?

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See also How do I tell I'm running in a chroot? –  Gilles Nov 9 '11 at 12:28
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up vote 13 down vote accepted

The inode for / will always be 2 if it's the root directory of a filesystem, but you may be chrooted inside a complete filesystem. If it's just chroot (and not some other virtualization), you could run mount and compare the mounted filesystems against what you see. Verify that every mount point has inode 2.

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Out of curiosity, what gets inode 1? –  Topaz Sep 22 '08 at 20:48
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bad blocks (historical/legacy) –  user10392 Sep 24 '08 at 21:11
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On linux, /sys and /proc are both inode == 1. devtmpfs is inode == 3. Cool trick but only reliable on "real" filesystems. –  SpamapS Jan 31 '11 at 21:04
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This isn't true for every filesystem. With XFS, for example, the root has inode 128. –  caf Feb 22 '11 at 4:27
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IOW, root_inode=$(stat -c %i /); if [ $root_inode -ne 2 -a $root_inode -ne 128 ]; ... –  l0b0 Mar 3 '11 at 16:22
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Preventing stuff like that is the whole point. If it's your code that's supposed to run in the chroot, have it set a flag on startup. If you're hacking, hack: check for several common things in known locations, count the files in /etc, something in /dev.

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On BSD systems (check with uname -a), proc should always be present. Check if the dev/inode pair of /proc/1/exe (use stat on that path, it won't follow the symlink by text but by the underlying hook) matches /sbin/init.

Checking the root for inode #2 is also a good one.

On most other systems, a root user can find out much faster by attempting the fchdir root-breaking trick. If it goes anywhere you are in a chroot jail.

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+1 .. device+inode of /proc/1/root or /proc/1/exe, are how several programs in Debian and Ubuntu determine whether or not they're being run in a chroot. –  SpamapS Feb 1 '11 at 10:09
    
If /sbin/init is hardlinked into the chroot environment, it will have the same dev/inode as the running one: false negative. If /sbin/init has been upgraded since the system was booted, it will have a different dev/inode even on the real root: false positive. –  caf Feb 22 '11 at 4:32
    
The false negative here requires that root inode not be 2. The false positive is hyper-rare. –  Joshua Feb 22 '11 at 20:51
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I guess it depends why you might be in a chroot, and whether any effort has gone into disguising it.

I'd check /proc, these files are automatically generated system information files. The kernel will populate these in the root filesystem, but it's possible that they don't exist in the chroot filesystem.

If the root filesystem's /proc has been bound to /proc in the chroot, then it is likely that there are some discrepancies between that information and the chroot environment. Check /proc/mounts for example.

Similrarly, check /sys.

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While it's easy to bind /proc, discrepancies within that data would be cumbersome to mask. Answer accepted. –  Topaz Sep 16 '08 at 18:27
    
Actually, scratch that - what about non-linux systems that don't have /proc and friends to begin with? –  Topaz Sep 16 '08 at 18:29
    
The question says to assume a standard Linux or BSD system. To the best of my knowledge, both have /proc. –  SpoonMeiser Sep 16 '08 at 18:32
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I'm staring at a BSD system right now, no /proc here. –  Topaz Sep 16 '08 at 18:34
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On Linux with root permissions, test if the root directory of the init process is your root directory. Although /proc/1/root is always a symbolic link to /, following it leads to the “master” root directory (assuming the init process is not chrooted, but that's hardly ever done). If /proc isn't mounted, you can bet you're in a chroot.

[ "$(stat -c %d:%i /)" != "$(stat -c %d:%i /proc/1/root/.)" ]
# With ash/bash/ksh/zsh
! [ -x /proc/1/root/. ] || [ /proc/1/root/. -ef / ]

This is more precise than looking at /proc/1/exe because that could be different outside a chroot if init has been upgraded since the last boot or if the chroot is on the main root filesystem and init is hard linked in it.

If you do not have root permissions, you can look at /proc/1/mountinfo and /proc/$$/mountinfo (briefly documented in filesystems/proc.txt in the Linux kernel documentation). This file is world-readable and contains a lot of information about each mount point in the process's view of the filesystem. The paths in that file are restricted by the chroot affecting the reader process, if any. If the process reading /proc/1/mountinfo is chrooted into a filesystem that's different from the global root (assuming pid 1's root is the global root), then no entry for / appears in /proc/1/mountinfo. If the process reading /proc/1/mountinfo is chrooted to a directory on the global root filesystem, then an entry for / appears in /proc/1/mountinfo, but with a different mount id. Incidentally, the root field ($4) indicates where the chroot is in its master filesystem. Again, this is specific to Linux.

[ "$(awk '$5=="/" {print $1}' </proc/1/mountinfo)" != "$(awk '$5=="/" {print $1}' </proc/$$/mountinfo)" ]
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If you entered the chroot with schroot, then you can check the value of $debian_chroot.

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